Building software based on the mathematics of the brain

Building software based on the mathematics of the brain

Summary: Palm creator Jeff Hawkins' presentation was a highlight today at PC Forum. He has been trying to decode how the brain works and is now looking to create software based on brain neocortex functions that could be applicable to artificial intelligence and structured data problems, vision, language, robotics and predicting weather and market trends.

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Palm creator Jeff Hawkins' presentation was a highlight today at PC Forum. He has been trying to decode how the brain works and is now looking to create software based on brain neocortex functions that could be applicable to artificial intelligence and structured data problems, vision, language, robotics and predicting weather and market trends. His goal,

Topic: Tech Industry

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  • Nice try - NOT!

    How will you create a computer that is BOTH electrical AND chemical - like the human brain? Oh you can't? Yes I know . . .
    Roger Ramjet
  • Pipe dreams

    How a man that copied an existing technology, and then was called an "inventor" will be able to re-create the human brain function, is beyond me (and everyone else). The human brain is MUCH more complicated than a computer. The neurons of the brain function electrically - so that could be modeled by a computer fairly accurately - but the "glial" cells release chemicals that alter the funtioning of the neurons. Not only that, these chemical releases follow fluid dynamics - where a "plume" of chemical affects certain areas of neurons - with the chemical being diluted near its edges, which would affect those neurons differently than the ones near the center of the plume. How the heck will he model THAT?

    You might be able to do a crude approximation of the glial cells by using associative memory (keyed on content). I've never actually seen any of this memory, but I've read about it in books - and its quite expensive.

    After you have your hardware model of the brain, now how to create the software, or "mind"? You could read Freud until you are as sleepy as Rip Van Winkle, but you wouldn't get what you needed. Carl Jung would be a MUCH better model for the mind, but its still not complete. Better give up while you're behind, since you could spend a lifetime at this and NEVER get any closer. . .
    Roger Ramjet