Combating ID theft with research

Combating ID theft with research

Summary: LexisNexis, IBM, the United States Secret Service, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute's CERT/CC, Indiana University's Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research, and Syracuse University's CASE Center, and Utica College in New York have joined forces to create a research center to combat identity theft. Heaven knows this is a topic that could use some fresh thinking.

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TOPICS: Security
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LexisNexis, IBM, the United States Secret Service, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute's CERT/CC, Indiana University's Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research, and Syracuse University's CASE Center, and Utica College in New York have joined forces to create a research center to combat identity theft.

Heaven knows this is a topic that could use some fresh thinking. The research agenda includes:

  • causes, early detection, and prevention of identity fraud and theft
  • the evolving threat from cyber criminals, insiders and organized crime groups
  • the impact and role of policy decisions, legislation and regulatory actions
  • improvement of identity authentication systems to reduce fraud and improper payments, and protect national security
  • the role of enabling technologies to protect information, facilitate privacy and share information.

With all of this, we'd do well to remember that, barring a pill to cure stupidity, the most effective protective measures against identity theft will remain good security practices in the enterprise and vigilance by consumers.

Topic: Security

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  • Combating ID theft

    I have always wondered what else might be done to combat ID theft. In particular, I considered the following for dealing with Phishing....

    I don't recall ever openning up an email that was an attempt to Phish, but I have received some email asking me about my citibank account. Since I don't have a citibank account, I have always deleted these. But I wondered... what if I openned this email, went to the phished site and entered in a factitious name and account number. Then I wondered, what if everyone would respond to these by entering factitious names and factitious account numbers. And then... why not make a bot that would automatically address Phishing items by putting in factitious names and account numbers over and over a thousand times. Would this plan fight fire with fire?

    Tell me, is it a) a screwy idea? b) a good idea but no one has every tried it, or c) it is a good idea and it is already be done, or d) it doesn't make any sense.
    davideyoungmd@...