Core Duo supply & demand means premium pricing. But on price/performance, Intel still has AMD beat (by a country mile)

Core Duo supply & demand means premium pricing. But on price/performance, Intel still has AMD beat (by a country mile)

Summary: Apparently, the law of supply and demand is kicking in with respect to Intel's new dual core microprocessors (officially, Core Duo, but previously code-named Conroe).  Not only does short supply mean higher prices,  but also a bit of rationing as well.

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TOPICS: Processors
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Apparently, the law of supply and demand is kicking in with respect to Intel's new dual core microprocessors (officially, Core Duo, but previously code-named Conroe).  Not only does short supply mean higher prices,  but also a bit of rationing as well. Fellow ZDNet blogger Adrian Kingsley-Hughes writes:

With almost any product, the success comes down to two things; pricing and availability.  It seems that Intel may have stumbled on both of these with the launch of the Core 2 Duo range of CPUs....availability is still patchy.  For example, Newegg are showing that the E6300 and E6400 are available immediately (although they are limited to one per customer), but the E6600, E6700 and X6800 are nowhere to be seen.  This is a real disappointment because it was the E6600 and E6700 that showed the most potential when it comes to overclocking.  While the E6300 and E6400 are powerful, the real powerhouses aren't available....Another sticking point is price.  Newegg shows the E6300 and E6400 priced at $249 and $299 respectively.  This is well above the distributor price of $183 and $224.  With such a large increase in price, it's worthwhile going back and reviewing any purchase plans and factor in this new data.

But, proving that there's a silver lining to every cloud, George Ou says:

There are only a few places that I have seen carry the Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 2.4 GHz processor.  [Intel's Core 2 Duo 2.4 Ghz] E6600 processor has a list price of $316 but is selling as high as $459 at major online retailers and even then they can't maintain any in stock.  Computer superstore Fry's is selling the 2.13 GHz E6400 with an Intel Desktop motherboard for $499 when the CPU itself only lists for $224.....they are able to beat the fastest AMD FX-62 desktop processor which lists for $827 and they beat any of the older generation non-Core Intel CPUs.....

Adrian also has some news about why cooling issues may end up delaying some of Dell's Core Duo offerings until February 2007.  That however hasn't stopped Michael Dell from making sure his home gets a fully-outfitted workstation with two of everything (2 sockets, 2 cores each, and 2 monitors).

Topic: Processors

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3 comments
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  • Core Duo?

    you really shouldnt call it Core Duo in the few places you did.

    "(officially, Core Duo, but previously code-named Conroe)."
    the only thing sold as Core Duo was Yonah, Conroe is Core 2
    Duo.

    "Adrian also has some news about why cooling issues may end
    up delaying some of Dell's Core Duo offerings until February
    2007."
    bad wording here, as its actualy about Dells Core 2 Duo offering.

    Yes i know you guys know what you meant, and know what I'm
    pointing out, but some passer-bys skimming through may not,
    and misunderstand whats going on, or think you guys are
    posting wrong information and stop looking.

    The main reason why i point this out is that Core Duo is not
    Core Michroarchitecure, even though it has the Core name, the
    Core 2 Duo is a different design.
    doh123
  • Bait & switch

    It's clear that Intel launched the Core 2 Duo as a publicity stunt to get some cheap marketing advantage over AMD. When Intel started moving the shipment dates forward, it really had nothing to do with whether production going so well that it can launch them early, all it wanted to do was get enough chips out to show off the benchmarks. It's probably also hoping people will come to buy a Core 2, and end up buying a Pentium when they can't find the Core 2's -- bait and switch. In the meantime, there are production quantities of AMD processors out there, so some of the baiting and switching may be benefitting AMD inadvertently.
    bbbl67
    • i doubt it

      i doubt it. Waiting a few weeks to a month isnt a problem. And
      if you can find one of the Core 2 Duos for sale, they are still
      priced better for the performance than AMDs chips.... the
      problem is finding it. Anyone looking just for the processor (not
      a whole computer system prebuilt) wont mind waiting, other
      than just settling. Anyone settling for a pentium-D are buying
      pre-built systems, and probably dont even have a clue what
      differences are in a processor and would have bought the Intel
      anyways because they know the jingle.

      I really dont see how any of this will benefit AMD.

      and i mean come on, supply and demand? everyone is upset
      they cost "too much" and are hard to find because its been
      almost 2 weeks since they were announced? This is normal even
      for AMD chips announced.
      doh123