Dell says so long to kiosks

Dell says so long to kiosks

Summary: Dell said Wednesday that it will close its 140 kiosks to focus on its direct sales and retail channel efforts.The PC maker launched the kiosks in 2002 as a way for customers to play with Dell's gear before placing an order.

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Dell said Wednesday that it will close its 140 kiosks to focus on its direct sales and retail channel efforts.

dell.pngThe PC maker launched the kiosks in 2002 as a way for customers to play with Dell's gear before placing an order. Given that Dell products are sprinkled throughout retailers like Wal-Mart and Best Buy these kiosks have become passe.

In a blog post, Dell noted that the kiosks are being shut down "to focus on phone sales, direct orders on Dell.com and selling products through retail outlets." Dell touted its retail strategy and maintained that it was commited to its direct business--the way most customers continue to buy. Dell added it will maintain its kiosks abroad.

Dell has never broken out sales from its kiosks, but I've never noticed one with lines around the block. I doubt that these kiosks will be missed all that much in your neighborhood mall.

Topics: Enterprise Software, Dell

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25 comments
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  • That was the dumbest idea...

    That was the dumbest idea I had heard from Dell. They tried to open up a "Dell Store"
    or "Dell Kiosk" like Gateway or Apple Stores, except that they didn't actually [i]sell[/i]
    anything.

    You still had to order everything over the web and wait for it to be shipped. It really
    made me wonder what the heck Dell was expecting by putting stores and kiosks in
    malls, and then not actually sell anything for prospective buyers to take home.
    olePigeon
    • It wasn't that dumb

      Actually I only went to a Dell Kiosk once. In 2004 I ordered and configured my son's INSPIRON 9100 at a Dell Kiosk after both looking over the XPS and talking to the Dell salesperson. It was helpful to both see and handle the hefty sized desktop replacements, and the salesperson was both informative and neutral since they didn't seem to be getting any commission(?) from the sale/order.
      On the whole though I think they are probably not cost-effective for Dell, nor particularly useful for cistomers who are having computer problems, or service issues.
      metajohn@...
      • Neutral?

        The guy who sells you the Dell is Neutral?!?!

        And how could you possibly know whether or not he gets a commission?
        Tigertank
  • Cool. Next up

    Say Good Bye to Dell.............

    One can only dream!
    itguy08
  • Bye Bye Dell. you won't be missed

    But your $hit will leave a sore taste in many mouths.
    itguy08
    • BYE ???

      Aren't they the #2 PC maker in the WORLD ??? I don't think they will fold anytime soon. Granted, they are having a rough time of it but fold... I think NOT !
      redtrain65
      • GM Was #1

        And they nearly went bankrupt.

        Ford was #1 and they nearly went bankrupt.

        Chrsyler was #2 and did go bankrupt.

        Want me to go on? Dell is #2 and declining.

        Make $hit for long enough and you go down. Tomorrow would be long overdue for Dell.
        itguy08
        • I think we get the point

          You don't like Dell. Maybe they'll call you up and ask you to forgive them (not)
          Blogsworth
        • Yeah, like they really care what you think...

          <yawn>
          hasta la Vista, bah-bie
  • wow, such venom...

    The major reason for the kiosks was to build brand awareness for the general public. But unfortunately, Dell products are not suited for public display because they just aren't very attractive. So I'm not surprised that Dell is closing them. I personally like Dell because their products are no frills and pretty well built. Granted their customer service has been on the decline but to wish an end for Dell is a bit much.
    nothingness
    • Cause I deal wth them all day

      Poorly built products that are slower than average, have a high defect rate, and generally are GARBAGE.
      itguy08
      • I've been happy

        We have a few more than 300 Dell desktop and notebook computers and have been quite happy with the lack of problems we have seen and the service received the few times we have found it necessary to call them. I just don't see the problem. Poorly built and slower than average compared to what?
        Network dude
      • Garbage, I think not

        I'm on my third Dell in about 11 years. Never had a single and I repeat single problem. In fact later this year I will buy my 4th Dell in a row...
        Blogsworth
        • I've had two Dells

          Along with two Sonys and an HP. They compare favorably to them.

          Granted the Vostro looks downright ugly next to the MacBook Air, but who says I want a pretty machine..

          :^)
          hasta la Vista, bah-bie
  • Sell those Dell Stores

    I think they should sell those Dell Stores and then give whatever money is left over
    back to the share holders.
    Len Rooney
  • What is wrong with some of you?

    Did you not see that the kiosks were established in 2002 - 6 years ago?! It's not like this was a fleeting concept. It had to die sometime. Everyone now knows that they can go online and have a customized PC built and delivered. There's no need to spend money on the costly kiosks for brand awareness anymore. As mentioned in the article, if someone needs their consumer Dell fix, they can go to a retailer to get one.

    Also, I don't have a problem with Dells. Yes, we've had some hardware malfunctions here at work, but considering how many computers and monitors we get from them (we are a total solution provider), it's a rare problem. When something does come up, Dell has quickly sent a replacement part.

    Perhaps you fell for the consumer Dimensions years ago instead of opting for an Optiplex? Obviously building your own is the best way to go (I did at home), but if I had to choose a pre-built, it'd be a Dell.
    AbbydonKrafts
    • recommending Dell...

      Recommending Dell used to be a no-brainer (About 10 years ago) Since then, they have declined to the point of being "lesser of the evils"

      I have serviced every major manufacturer and have yet to hear of an absolutely better make in every way. (Construction Service Serviceability..)
      For instance: Think Pads were absolutely constructed with stronger cases, but would have weird sub-board issues that took an hour+ to replace. Plus they were really expensive with expensive replacement parts. You could replace the board on a Latitude in about 15 minutes.

      Unless you can find a good, responsible mom and pop store, but they don't manufacture laptops that most people now want..
      phake
  • Get real folks

    I have a shop full of Dell machines.....that I hate. Very bad experience with premature support termination....but that isn't the point. Marketing concepts evolve. There are folks that love Dell machines and won't use anything else.

    Michael has come up with wht appears to be a refresh plan for the company and from what I gather it seems to be working. Give them a chance (with no bailout) and they still could make a go of it. If not, well, then so be it.
    nwoodson@...
  • RE: Dell says so long to kiosks

    my co uses DELL and i wont miss them they are slow
    cabrown451
  • Once upon a time...

    ... there was a generation of people who hadn't actually used the Internet, who weren't used to Just In Time manufacturing, and thought in terms of "mass production" rather than "mass customization".

    Dell provided PCs at a _fraction_ of the price of the others, built them to order in a very efficient way (supply-chain and manufacturing wise) and single-handed made computers affordable to a whole mass of people who'd never thought of having one at home before.

    The Dell kiosks made that generation of customers aware of Dell as a brand, and therefore got them into build-to-order PCs.

    Of course, you can have "buy it now, take it home", but there's a COST associated with speculative building and keeping stock sitting on a shelf in the hope someone buys it. What Dell proved is that a lot of people would rather wait 10 days and make a big saving.

    Oh, and for the record, I'm typing this on a Dell Inspiron... but my next laptop will probably be a Mac :-)
    MarkHarrison