Developer tasks made simpler with virtualization

Developer tasks made simpler with virtualization

Summary: David Morgenstern explores Apple's BootCamp and Parallels along with their deeper meaning in an article at eWeek. He asks "[A]re there really so few native solutions that Mac users must resort to Windows?

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David Morgenstern explores Apple's BootCamp and Parallels along with their deeper meaning in an article at eWeek. He asks "[A]re there really so few native solutions that Mac users must resort to Windows? Or is something else going on?"

He concludes that Apple's making a mistake in promoting BootCamp by sending a mixed message to the market and that "Apple must get out in front of boosting its platform to a wider group of vertical segments."

There are other reasons for using Parallels (and to some extent BootCamp) that merely running software that doesn't work on OS X. Just this week, for example, I wrote about using Parallels to set up test Linux environments for a class I teach that uses Linux--it certainly was a lot easier for me to do that in Parallels than to set aside a separate machine for that purpose. For example, I can have multiple images in different states and easily revert back to a specific set-up.

I also use Windows and Linux running on Parallels to see how Web sites I'm working on look in different browsers and on different platforms. Nothing like having IE running in a window on your OS X box for quick checks.

My students use different VM images on the machines in the lab for running their projects. They're portable and they can easily take the exact environment they're using with them to another machine or even take it home to work on.

I'll grant that this is more about Parallels than BootCamp, but I'm not sure why you'd use BootCamp over Parallels except for the cost ($79.99 for a Parallels license). I'll also grant that my uses are more specialized toward developers than the general public. Still, it's not a small market and it makes OS X a nearly perfect development environment, in my opinion.

Topic: Operating Systems

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  • Not just Mac OS X

    I'm looking at switching to Kubuntu, and I've looked at Parallels as a serious option... as well as VMWare, and Win4Lin... and to be quite honest, I like the style of interaction where it's just a double click to open a window and boot an OS...

    My prefered work environment would probably be a Mac at the bottom, because it'd *just work*... for many things, that's the most important thing... but for development and special use, you need the broader base of interaction/customizability, to properly do your work.........

    My only real problem is that there's no *free* equivalent to Parallels/VMWare which has the required support/ease to use... (the joys of being back in university... I'm back to being broke)

    oh, and before anyone points me to Xen, I've looked into it already, and I'm looking to NOT reinstall any of my stuff... I currently lack the ability to back up my *essential* files, so, even while I have all my installation CDs, I can't afford to use them.
    shryko