Early reviews on SanDisk-Yahoo MP3 player good

Early reviews on SanDisk-Yahoo MP3 player good

Summary: Yahoo announced the SanDisk Sansa Connect--a new Wi-Fi-enabled portable MP3 player loaded with a bevy of Yahoo services such as Yahoo Messenger, Yahoo Music and Flickr--and the early reviews are good.  From our review: Price: The player (gallery at right) carries an MSRP of $250, which is slightly high for a 4GB device, but it's not unreasonable to pay a bit more for advanced technology.

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Yahoo announced the SanDisk Sansa Connect--a new Wi-Fi-enabled portable MP3 player loaded with a bevy of Yahoo services such as Yahoo Messenger, Yahoo Music and Flickr--and the early reviews are good. 

From our review:

Price:

The player (gallery at right) carries an MSRP of $250, which is slightly high for a 4GB device, but it's not unreasonable to pay a bit more for advanced technology. Plus, you can always add more memory via the built-in microSD slot--we certainly can't complain about expandable memory. We also can't complain about the player's design and interface. It's a slick little player with a nice-feeling black enclosure and a cute, stubby antenna poking out of the top, rather like that of a portable satellite radio device. The 2.2-inch screen is nice and bright with good color saturation, and the icon-driven menus are fun and easy to navigate.

Controls:

The Connect's controls complement the interface nicely. Below the screen is a tactile scroll wheel, which can be clicked in four directions as well: up activates the home function, pulling up the main menu wheel at the bottom of the screen; down starts and stops playback; and right/left serve to shuttle between menu levels and tracks.

Wi-Fi:

We're still having issues hopping onto the local free Wi-Fi, but we hope to work it out with some more communication with SanDisk.

Topic: Reviews

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5 comments
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  • More cripple-ware

    Ugly, big, way too expensive for a 4 GB player. For $249 one could buy a 30 GB iPod if storage space is a priority, or an 8 GB Nano if size is a priority (and still get more storage space). Given that it's Windows only and totally DRM-laden, why bother? Why pay extra $ for a crippled system now when the whole world is moving away from locked-down DRMed music?
    tic swayback
    • How is it any more 'DRM-laden'

      then an iPod?
      And without a subscription service, why bother with the iPod?
      mdemuth
      • It is based around rental music

        ---How is it any more 'DRM-laden'then an iPod?---

        Simple--the whole purpose of this device, the thing that differentiates it from other players, is the use of wifi for subscriptions to music. That's its whole point, its raison d??tre, agreed?

        The whole rental music business is based around DRM. You can't have rental music without DRM. Any music you rent is going to be crippled by DRM--you can't burn it to cd for example, or lend the file to a friend. So, this whole device is based upon using DRM, whereas the iPod, which does have some DRM-ability, is completely usable without any DRM at all. You could say the same thing about the SanDisk device, but then it's just a bulky and overpriced wannabe. If you don't use the DRM on it, then it's a terrible value for the price.

        ---And without a subscription service, why bother with the iPod?---

        Because very few people seem to be interested in subscriptions. Not a single rental music company is turning a profit. I guess you missed the big news last week, where EMI is abandoning DRM on their downloads. Seems that crippling music has been deemed a failure in the eyes of consumers. Companies that insist on continuing with a failed business model have only themselves to blame.
        tic swayback
        • So, let me see if I understand you

          The content you can choose to put on the device (or not, remember it's your choice) can have (or not) the very same amount of DRM that is on the Apple iPod, again at your discretion.

          So again, how does it make the device any more DRM laden then the iPod?

          And the only thing crippling is Apple's lack of a subscription service. Sour grapes and all on your part; once again you do it the iSheep way, or you have no choice but to not do it on Apple equipment.

          I prefer choices. I like to decide on how I consume content on my devices, not being told by my corporate masters.

          Also, I like the subscription model. To have the same access to the amount of music on an iPod, I would need to spend over $5000. At $10 bucks a month, I've just paid for 40+ years of subscription.
          And that is just the first few months.
          And I can buy the tracks I like, so again I gain, while you (and the Apple do nothing but what we tell you) model loses.

          Have I got it now?
          mdemuth
          • I wish I was as crippled as Apple

            ---So again, how does it make the device any more DRM laden then the iPod?---

            Unlike the iPod, which works on both Windows and OSX, this device is Windows-only, so it is immediately more limited than the iPod due to the WMA DRM it employs. End of argument. I win.

            That said, you are missing the point. If you don't want to use DRM'ed material, you'd have to be a complete idiot to buy this device. Why pay $249 for a 4GB SanDisk player when you could instead buy a 4GB SanDisk player without all the wireless DRM enablement for $149? Or spend $199 and get an 8 GB player? Why spend more money to get less storage space on the same device? Why not buy an iPod for the same price and get 30 GB of storage space?

            ---And the only thing crippling is Apple's lack of a subscription service. Sour grapes and all on your part;---

            Since when does the winner exhibit sour grapes? I may be a sore winner, but Apple has sold over 100 million iPods. Gee, they sound really crippled. Funny how they're raking in profits hand over fist while all of your beloved rental companies are losing money. Remind me again who is "crippled" here....

            ---I prefer choices. I like to decide on how I consume content on my devices, not being told by my corporate masters.---

            Me too. That's why I don't buy DRM crippled content, especially rental content that disappears when I stop paying a ransom to my corporate masters.

            ---Also, I like the subscription model---

            Good for you. You are a tiny minority.

            As a suggestion, check out eMusic. For the same monthly fee, you can get around 50 songs per month, no strings attached and you can keep them forever. Might be a good way to free yourself from the chains of the corporate masters you so despise yet seem so willing to support.
            tic swayback