Everex delivers $198 Google-friendly PC

Everex delivers $198 Google-friendly PC

Summary: Everex has teamed up with open source players to create a $198 PC (sans display). The Everex Green gPC TC2502 runs a Linux OS and is loaded with (or has links to) free applications, including Gmail, Google Docs & Spreadsheets, Google Calendar, Google Product Search, Google Blogger, Google YouTube, Google Maps, Google News, Meebo (instant messaging), GIMP (image editing), Firefox, Xing Movie Player, RhythmBox (iTunes substitute), Faqly (tech support), Facebook, Skype and OpenOffice.

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Everex has teamed up with open source players to create a $198 PC (sans display). The Everex Green gPC TC2502 runs a Linux OS and is loaded with (or has links to) free applications, including Gmail, Google Docs & Spreadsheets, Google Calendar, Google Product Search, Google Blogger, Google YouTube, Google Maps, Google News, Meebo (instant messaging), GIMP (image editing), Firefox, Xing Movie Player, RhythmBox (iTunes substitute), Faqly (tech support), Facebook, Skype and OpenOffice.org 2.2. The gPC will be available in Wal-Mart stores and at walmart.com this month.

"Sub-$200 is magical price point for impulse buyer, and we can deliver 65 to 95 percent savings with open source software," said Paul Kim, Everex director of marketing. Everex will have about 20,000 gPCs in the pipeline this quarter, he added.

everex.jpg Somehow the $198 gPC become the $199 gPC

The target market is people looking for a cheap, easy to use desktop platform. "Initially we thought of first time users," Kim said. "We did some studies and found a lot of the older generation were interested." Everex wil provide free telephone support for gPC customers.

With the name gPC and all the Google software, you could think that this is a Google PC. Everex is careful to state that applications from Google are an integral part of our product, however, gOS is an entity entirely independent from Google. Everex did get approval from Google to use the icons and trademarks on its gPC.

Besides green, the "g" stands for the gOS, the Ubuntu 7.1 Linux desktop developed by an open source startup of the same name. "The gOS is an alternative operating system that makes it apparent that Google is your entire computing experience," said gOS founder David Liu. "When you make Linux look pretty and put ton of Google apps on it, you pacify it for consumer. You could say gOS is Google inspired but not official stamped." gOS uses the Enlightenment window manager and has taken cues from Apple in designing the interface.

everex2.jpg

According the Kim, the gPC costs about $170 to make, giving Wal-Mart and Everex some margin. A comparable Vista machine could cost a few hundred dollars more. However, the gPC isn't going to deliver a great multimedia experience. It comes with a low power 1.5 GHz Via C7-D processor and chipsets, 512 MB of SDRAM, an 80 GB disk and a DVD/CD-RW drive. Connectivity to the Internet is via Ethernet--no built-in wireless option.

It appears that Google will be working with a host of hardware partners to bundle its software on systems as a way to spread the Google gospel.

Everex is working on an ultra-mobile gPC and other configurations the Google-oriented, Apple-flavored systems, Kim said. The company also plans to introduce a Spanish language version of the gPC.

gPC's software is free, but the company is exploring advertising and other ways to monetize its open source desktop, Liu said. Free open source software wants to be free, but developers need to eat...

Topics: Open Source, Google, Hardware

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  • This story is a lie

    According to the DoJ, the EU, the EC, and 99% of posters on ZDNet, when you buy a PC, you are forced to buy Windows (except for Dell's Linux line which doesn't count because there's only a couple models, Macs don't count because they are only useful for desktop publishing, TigerDirect doesn't count because you have to navigate a menu to find naked PCs, and your local PC builder doesn't count because they don't have millions of dollars of revenue). Please retract this article or at least put a disclaimer at the bottom stating that you are still forced to pay for Windows when you buy a PC.

    Thanks you.
    NonZealot
    • I think people have stated that it's simply not easy

      for the average consumer to get a Linux system setup and ready for the "out of
      the box" experience many a common consumer is looking for. The "toaster"
      effect. This may lead others like Dell to consider this modell. After all with
      Google Apps and such the initial setup can be fairly simple for Dell to do and still
      provide a full featured low cost system. It has promise I think...

      Few consumers want to JUMP through hoops to buy anything yes even a computer
      system. if it's difficult to find or configure for most that is a no thank you.

      Pagan jim
      Laff
      • No, that isn't the complaint

        [i]I think people have stated that it's simply not easy for the average consumer to get a Linux system setup and ready for the "out of the box" experience many a common consumer is looking for.[/i]

        No, the complaint is that you are forced to pay for Windows when you buy a PC. You are focusing only on Linux as an alternative. Are you willing to suggest that it isn't easy for, and I quote:
        [i]the average consumer to get an OSX system setup and ready for the "out of the box" experience many a common consumer is looking for.[/i]

        If this is your belief, what exactly is it about Apple that makes buying a Mac without Windows so difficult?
        NonZealot
        • It's old argument

          At one time it was true but things have begun changing. Problem is how long will this last seeing as most people want Windows, not because they care what OS they get but because they have an application that say it need Windows XP or Vista.

          So technically it could still be considered true but really is that Microsoft fault today? Could be a bit but really I think it's more the market speaking than anything.
          voska
          • your arguement is the one thats getting old

            tired of the same ol ms hate machine.

            whatever man... puhleese.
            pcguy777
          • Pretty much the same , when non_zealot(ZEALOT SUPREME)

            Bashes everyone but his beloved MS . Hey Non_Zealot , you must really love those
            brownies .
            Intellihence
          • What have got against Microsoft?

            You can choose any OS you like. Just because the market chooses Windows you get all upset?
            voska
          • IBM choose MS (And regretted it)

            People being well people and often like to follow the lead of someone whom they
            "belieave" has superior knowledge to themselves often follow. The rest is as they
            say history. Once dug in....... MS will be hard to unseat perhaps even impossible. I
            myself don't want to see MS destroyed. Made smaller so others can squeeze in
            sure competition is GOOD even GREAT for the consumer and business alike.
            Makes everyone better. Still it's hard to argue that once IBM give MS it's blessing
            that the "market" took an unbiased look at the then options. Commodore, CP/M,
            Apple, and DOS and decided simply on the merits that MS was the way to go. IBM
            made MS.

            Pagan jim
            Laff
          • It's old argument ... but not for all

            Yes, many people do not even know what LINUX is. Many, that buy the computer, will think they can buy games off the self. This computer is NOT FOR THEM. This Computer should say that this in the ad and on the box. This computer is for a lot of users that want just do word processing, homework, and surf the web.

            It is great for that, and cheap.
            Trent Black
        • Apple selling Mac's running on Windows would make

          them just another "clone" maker. Not a business model I would want to follow
          since the pool is rather full. Margines small, chances for innovation and creativity
          limited and ownership of the whole widget impossible. No I think Apple has the
          better formular and I verify that opinion with my business.....

          The history of Apple and the consumer is a long one (Apple's been in the business
          since the begining) and a complicated one. Many a consumer in fact the vast
          majority could not be blamed for not thinking about Apple as an alternative for a
          long time people thought Apple had gone away. If not for the return of Steve Jobs
          they may have been right. The original iMac made a blip on the screen but it was
          not till the iPod and eventually the iPhone showed up that people really started to
          see the Macintosh and OSX as a viable option. Halo effect I think it is called..:P
          Still for many a year Apple simply was not on the vast majority of people's radar
          so technically there was a choice but a choice you are not aware of or informed of
          is not a choice at all now is it? The history here is very complicated because MS
          had it's own Halo effect with the blessing of IBM the(at the time) business worlds
          lord and savior. Anything IBM said or did HAD to be the right thing for IBM was
          GOD. When IBM choose MS as it's personal computer OS supplier that Halo effect
          turned a lot of head and hearts to MS. Many things happening across time. Many
          different events. Less than honorable business practices, OEM contracts that
          stiffled competition and other Applicatioin providers. A lot was going on and the
          consumer began to think that the only choice was indeed MS. Not true.....
          certainly but trust me on this one finds it very difficult to argue against belief no
          matter how silly it maybe.

          Linux has yet to have it's HALO moment. But perhaps with the soon to be
          released mobile phones running on Linux and these pre-configured systems and
          Google apps might combine to make the average consumer more aware of yet
          another choice.

          Pagan jim
          Laff
          • No one ever talks about VMWARE supporting apple

            why this has not happened yet is beyond me.

            then.. we can all run the latest os x on windows xp.

            its only a matter of time before someone cracks or updates vmware legitimately to do this.

            then its over for macs...

            why would i need pretty white hardware then.

            think about it.
            pcguy777
          • re: VMWare

            I shouldn't even be responding to this since it is sooo off-topic from the article, it isn't even funny. But anyway...

            VMWare does have the Fusion product line that allows you to run VMWare on OSX. But specifically in answer to your question, VMWare actually has successfully been able to virtualize OSX itself, but cannot release it due to Apple's licensing issues.

            So if you want to make an issue of it, talk to Apple, don't beef it up in a posting to an article that has absolutely nothing to do with what you're asking.
            yyuko9
          • Who said anything about Macs running Windows?

            I didn't. I thought the exercise was to buy a computer [b]without[/b] Windows.

            As far as people not knowing about the Apple, I totally disagree. Apple is [b]famous[/b] for its ad campaigns. People have always known about Apple, they just didn't want to buy an Apple.

            I would also suggest that just by [b]mentioning[/b] Apple, the DoJ acknowledged that Apple was known about enough that people would see the Findings of Fact and think "hey, what about Apple?". They quickly had to artificially narrow the market and discount the Mac since it wasn't x86 compatible even though it could be used to perform any end user task demanded of any x86 computer.
            NonZealot
          • Wrong...wrong...wrong..

            Apple for years even decades was blamed for NOT advertising and getting the word
            out. The one and only famous commercial it made before the iPod error was the
            1984 commercial during a Super Bowl and that was credited for being a good
            commercial but it did not result in much but awards for the commerical itself. Apple
            is NOW famous for it's ad's and in large part that started with the iPod. How old are
            you?

            Pagan jim
            Laff
          • I'm old enough

            I'm old enough to remember a time when Macs had a 16% marketshare. Are you?
            NonZealot
          • I remember back in the day when the Apple II line

            had a huge Market Share but that was before IBM gave MS it's blessing
            and it's start. Still I can't say I remember specifically when Mac had a
            16% market share and I tend to doubt it ever did but I admit I could be
            wrong. Perhaps back in the day when the market was still in it's infancy
            and IBM and MS had yet to consume the market perhaps.

            Pagan jim
            Laff
        • I dunno

          Every time I have walked into a computer store and priced systems, there's no possible way to get it without Windows. If you know of a big name store that I can walk into *RIGHT NOW* and buy a Compaq, HP, Averatec, Sony, Toshie or Acer without Windows, then please inform all of us at ZDNet where this may be done.
          Sabz5150
          • NonZ's point is that there are options.

            The details about consumers NOT wanting to hunt or knowing where to hunt escapes
            him or he chooses to ignore it. He claims Apple has always been an option but he
            fails to note the history involved and the very real fact that for the vast majority of
            consumers Apple dropped of their collective radar for several years and it took a
            combination of factors to bring Apple back into focus. The return of Steve Jobs, the
            original iMac and finally the iPod. All of this took time......

            Paggan jim
            Laff
          • Answer the question

            [i]The details about consumers NOT wanting to hunt or knowing where to hunt escapes him or he chooses to ignore it.[/i]

            History notwithstanding, do consumers have to HUNT for a Mac [b]TODAY[/b]? If the answer is no, then you agree that Sabz's question is artificially restricted to get the artificial answer he wants.
            NonZealot
          • Mac, Mac, Mac, Mac

            You sound like a duck with a drawl.

            Why is Apple your ONLY trump card?
            Sabz5150