Galaxy Tab return rates prove that 2010 belonged to iPad

Galaxy Tab return rates prove that 2010 belonged to iPad

Summary: In a post yesterday, I waved some red flags over a report that touted skyrocketing growth of Android-powered tablets and the impact on the Apple's iPad. Specifically, I questioned the headlines around the big numbers for Android and cautioned that things aren't always what they seem.

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In a post yesterday, I waved some red flags over a report that touted skyrocketing growth of Android-powered tablets and the impact on the Apple's iPad. Specifically, I questioned the headlines around the big numbers for Android and cautioned that things aren't always what they seem.

And today, here comes another research finding that drives home my point: Apparently, the Samsung Galaxy Tablet - the iPad's only real competitor last year - has an unusually high return rate. From the November debut of the Galaxy Tab through January 15, ITG Investment Research found that, thorough December 31, the return rate was about 13 percent, according to a post on the All Things Digital blog. Add in the number of holiday purchases returned and that number creeps up toward 16 percent.

By comparison, the return rate on the iPad is about 2 percent.

Also: High return rate for Galaxy Tab — is it tablet remorse?

Of course, none of this really matters too much. The return rate on the Samsung Galaxy Tab is hardly an indicator of how well Google's mobile OS will do in the marketplace in the coming year. It was widely accepted that 1) Samsung rushed this product to market and 2) the "Froyo" version of Android wasn't optimized for tablet computing.

Later this month, Motorola is expected to release the Xoom tablet, a device that will run on the next version of Android, called "Honeycomb." That OS will be showcased tomorrow at an event that will be held on the Google campus in Silicon Valley. (I'll be at the event, so look for live coverage on ZDNet.)

When all is said and done, you really just have to give 2010 to Apple and its iPad. But 2011 will be a different story. There will definitely be some real competition this year and while RIM is expected to also launch its Playbook tablet this year, those running on Google's Android OS are expected to be the real challenger to Apple's dominance.

Topics: Tablets, Hardware, iPad, Laptops, Mobility, Samsung

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12 comments
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  • RE: Galaxy Tab return rates prove that 2010 belonged to iPad

    The price needs to be right.
    tatiGmail
    • Perhaps they will match the pricing model of the Roid Phones...

      @tatiGmail

      Perhaps they will match the pricing model of the Roid Phones?Buy one, get one free, or free with a 2 year contract... And then people will actually buy them... Oh Wait... That won't work... Oh well, guess Roid has to earn this one.... LOL
      i8thecat
    • RE: Galaxy Tab return rates prove that 2010 belonged to iPad

      @tatiGmail Samsung shot themselves in the foot on this, what they should have done is sold it at Best buy, for whatever they were asking (assuming 500) and then let the consumer decide if they wanted a data plan with it, then if they took it the counter and said they wanted a data plan, then they could have gotten a discount that way, personally I wouldnt want a data plan with my tablet, I would get a phone with a wifi hotspot and use that instead..
      nickdangerthirdi
  • RE: Galaxy Tab return rates prove that 2010 belonged to iPad

    May as well just give 2011 to Apple also. With the momentum Apple have going into 2011 with gen one (close to 15 million, 7 million sold alone in the 4th), it will be very difficult for others to grab that all important mindshare. Sansung gave just about the best effort you can give against the iPad in 2010 and still couldn't come close to challenging it. From advertising everywhere to developing their own accessories. And still, not great sales, and the return rate is high.
    dave95.
  • RE: Galaxy Tab return rates prove that 2010 belonged to iPad

    Dell Streak 7" is also going to be DOA. With its crappy support and resolution who wants it. iPad and iPad 2 are going to rule the slates arena for a while. Androids, no way.
    Ram U
  • Wow, 84% of Tab owners lost their receipt;-)

    Just kidding.
    Bruizer
  • Android is a failure and Google is still an one trick pony

    Android is crap. People who want things to just work will buy the iPad.
    iPad-awan
    • RE: Galaxy Tab return rates prove that 2010 belonged to iPad

      @iPad-awan

      Winner for the most nonsensical post!

      And let me append your last statement:

      People who want what Steve Jobs wants them to want when he wants them to want it will buy the iPad.
      man_strosity
    • RE: Galaxy Tab return rates prove that 2010 belonged to iPad

      @iPad-awan
      Hell once I learned that 80% of the web was not accessble bu the ipad that I wanted to return mine. but was not willing to pay Apple's restocking fee of 10%.
      rparker009
      • RE: Galaxy Tab return rates prove that 2010 belonged to iPad

        @rparker009

        Hey now, don't get all logical on us now. My Galaxy Tab came with a 30-day risk free trial.

        The iPad trial period and restocking fee? Well, what does the 900 lb gorilla in the room do? Whatever it wants.
        man_strosity
  • RE: Galaxy Tab return rates prove that 2010 belonged to iPad

    AT&T Returns Policy & Early Termination Fee<br>14 days for tablets<br>10% restocking fee applies to all tablet purchases<br><br>Sprint 30-day Satisfaction Guarantee<br>Refund monthly charges incurred as part of your service plan*<br>Refund the activation fee<br>Refund the purchase price of your device<br>Waive the Early Termination Fee<br>Waive the restocking fee<br>Refund taxes and Sprint surcharges associated with the above charges
    man_strosity
  • Don't believe everything you read...

    "There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics."
    BigTipper