Gates at CES: Digital workstyle circa 2010

Gates at CES: Digital workstyle circa 2010

Summary: Before introducing a flashy Windows Vista, Bill Gates started off his Consumer Electronics Show keynote walking through a digital lifestyle scenario that he said would be a reality by 2010. The scenario starts in the morning with a large touch screen that includes various kind of data and applications-- the kids' drawings, a video application (similar to CNN Pipeline) and maps with locations of various family members (you can track your kids progress to school).

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Before introducing a flashy Windows Vista, Bill Gates started off his Consumer Electronics Show keynote walking through a digital lifestyle scenario that he said would be a reality by 2010. The scenario starts in the morning with a large touch screen that includes various kind of data and applications-- the kids' drawings, a video application (similar to CNN Pipeline) and maps with locations of various family members (you can track your kids progress to school). He showed how he could initiate an alert on the touch screen and send the video feed to his cell phone.  Then Gates moved a few feet and was at work, with a huge screen that included about four large LCD panels across a large desk, encompassing his entire field of vision. He demoed collaboration, including video, IM, document sharing and other conferencing capabilities, many of which exist today.

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Gates keynoting at CES

Finally, the scenario took him to the airport with only his cell phone. This was that hottest part of the demo. He laid the phone a special table (Microsoft researcher Andy Wilson's PlayAnywhere interactive tabletop projection vision system) with cameras and wireless connectivity. It recognized his (Windows-based) cell phone, and popped up a virtual desktop, allowed him to log in via his thumbprint and do some work.  He scanned a business card and then dragged it over the contact application (or apparition) on the tabletop.  Very cool. It may be ready for Bill and his friends in 2010, but not for the masses.

Gates' mantra was that "software is at the center," and having all devices work together with ease--a "cross-device approach."  He also announced a deal with MTV (including an appearance by Justin Timberlake who suggested he and Bill do a duet--"artistry and technology"), promoted the Tablet PC and the Palm Treo 700 and Motorola Q, which both use Windows Mobile.  He also touched on the Windows Live theme: "Everything is moving to the Internet--you have to have confidence in these things, backed up, secure and reliable and easy to connect to people and devices."

He also talked about the shift in TV, becoming more personalized with targeted content, ads and interactivity. AT&T and Verizon are rolling out commercial deployments of video platform services this year, Gates said. And, that's where Media Center comes in, he added. He said Microsoft had 6.5 million copies of Media Center in existence (in use?) and 130 manufacturers supporting it, including Intel and Direct TV. News.com's Ina Fried has the details on the various announcements and demos, including HD-DVD. Engadget has the play-by-play, with photos, of the keynote.
 

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Topic: CES

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7 comments
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  • Scary new world.

    If life ends up revolving around digital technology as opposed to technology around life and Microsoft is at the center of it all I can say is I am glad we only live around a hundred years.
    whieber
    • Scary New World

      I see what you mean there.

      Personally, I thinks some of this technology is very cool - I've been writing code on Microsoft platforms since the early 80's. This whole idea of being "plugged-in" 24-hours-a-day bugs me, though. Like many people I carry a cell phone, PDA and have a laptop but I'm refuse to "blue tooth" and WiFi myself in all the time. I see people walking around like the freaking Borg with those earpieces in. Next it will be laser eye patches that keeps a computer screen (HUD) in front of you every where you go and brain implants so you can interact with it all without moving a muscle. We'll have rows and rows of people in an office no bigger than an airliner cabin all plugged in and working - and barely breathing.

      <shudder>

      -CB
      CodeBubba
      • New Windows?

        I would just like a version of windows that does not require incessant patching. Forget all the other nifty features. Just an OS that boots consistently and does not require patches every few weeks. Now that would be new.
        fauxshaman@...
        • incessant patching

          quote::I would just like a version of windows that does not require incessant patching.::quote

          You are NEVER going to get that. Not even Linux or Mac can go without requiring patches (software developers make mistakes, that's a fact of life). The difference is that on Linux and Mac, the patches actually work, and they are more or less transparent to the user, in that they are available immediately - you don't need to wait until patch tuesday - and when they are installed the computer DOES NOT need to be rebooted, in fact you can continue working while the patch is installed.


          quote::Just an OS that boots consistently...... Now that would be new.::quote

          Actually it's old, just over 10 years old, it's called Linux.
          tracy anne
          • RE: incessant patching

            I understand periodically there will be a situation that requires a revision in the operating system. SP 2 is a patch that rewrote most of the key components of the operating system. Service pack 2 downloaded approximately 274mb of compressed data. installed it was more than 400mb. When you replace 40% or more of the operating system, it is not a patch. The number and severity of change in service pack 2 is comparable to Windows 98SE.

            Windows XP, when released was seriously flawed. Service pack 1 made a poor attempt at fixing these flaws. Service pack 1A, fixed service pack 1's errors.

            This does not include the little patches every month. I call this incessant.
            fauxshaman@...
      • Scary New World (CodeBubba)

        <shudder> Your posting put me in mind of the "focussing" in Vernor Vinge's novel _A Deepness in the Sky_. Highly recommended, BTW. Read it and ask yourself if you can't see certain folks trying to do something like that to us all if they could just figure out how. The Borg, at least, get to get up and go walkies.
        rocket ride
  • So how many times did it crash or lockup?

    The thought of a windows based phone scares me. The CE based palms are already getting viruses and being compromised. Might consider a OSX based device though, no problems with those devices in 4 years, knock on apples.
    ralphrides