Google Android: A market share vacuum cleaner

Google Android: A market share vacuum cleaner

Summary: The comScore numbers for July are in and Google, still marching strong with its Android army, seems to be stealing market share from everyone except for Palm

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RIM and Apple may lead the pack in mobile phone market share but once again, Google is coming up strong with its Android devices, closing in fast on the headstart advantage that the others once had. And at least in the U.S. it seems to be sucking up everyone else's market share.

According to comScore data released today, Google's Android was the only smartphone platform to see a gain in the number of subscribers in the U.S. - coming in at 17 percent of market share in July, a 5 percent gain from April.

RIM, which ended the period with a 39.3 percent market share, and Apple, which ended with 23.8 percent, both saw declines in the three-month period, down 1.8 percent and 1.3 percent, respectively. Microsoft was down 2.2 percent to end with 11.8 percent share while Palm ended flat, just shy of 5 percent of share.

The research firm also looked at the thing that mobile users - not just smartphone users - do with their devices. Browser usage jumped 2.5 percent to reach 33.6 percent of users while accessing a social network or blog gained 1.9 percent, now at 21.8 percent.

The report also saw Samsung widen its lead over LG for subscribers. Samsung's 1 percent gain gives it 23.1 percent of the market while LG slipped more than one-half of one percent, down to 21.2 percent. Motorola saw the largest decline, 1.8 percent, bringing it down to less than 20 percent of markst share.

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Topics: Mobile OS, Android, Google, Hardware, Mobility, BlackBerry, Smartphones

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22 comments
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  • The market for smart phones in still growing

    Any claims of market share are misleading. Palm, RIM and Apple are single vendors, and Android numbers are a aggregate of many vendors. There's also a very strong chance of incompatibility between Android devices, since the handset makers and carriers can modify it.
    GoPower
    • Misleading how?

      @GoPower

      If you compare the market share of Windows vs OSX you would not make the same silly arguments. The fact that Google opened their OS to anyone and Apple did not, is absolutely irrelevant. The market shares of the smart phone OSs are what they are, regardless of whatever mental contortions you choose to come up with.
      Economister
      • What silly argument?

        @Economister

        Microsoft and OEM's offered one "Windows OS" to the public. There were no skins, no different naming, no confusions, it was one Windows experience on various hardware.

        Can someone define the "Android" experience for me please, it is so confusing. Is it TouchWiz? Sense? MotoBlur? MotoNinja? the Cliq? Is it Verizon Fasinate that comes with Bing as default instead of the expected Google search bar? Verizon is rumored to be offering their own App Store soon which may replace the Android Market Place on their phones. Will this be the true "Android" experience? Without Android market place?

        It is misleading. There is not one universal Android experience like there is one Windows, or one BlackBerry, or one iOS. Android by design was meant to be modified in any which way by carriers and OEMs.
        dave95.
      • RE: Google Android: A market share vacuum cleaner

        @dave95.
        Since when was there one Windows experience
        The old windows mobile had skins just like Android and the new windows mobile still has to sell its first device.
        sovok_
      • RE: Google Android: A market share vacuum cleaner

        @dave95 below<br><br>The "Android experience" is the ability to do all that and more. But then if you love Apple that much, the word "customize" probably isn't in your vocabulary.
        blueskip
      • RE: Google Android: A market share vacuum cleaner

        @sovok_<br><br>I don't recall a Dell or if we want to go way back, a Compaq selling a skinned version of Windows to consumers (i.e. TouchWiz, MotoBlur, Sense). And having users lose support if they remove (root) the skin. There were One Windows OS, and one UI for users to be familiarized with. Same as it is today.<br><br>@blueskip<br><br>No ones talking about the ability for a user to customize Windows.
        dave95.
  • RE: Google Android: A market share vacuum cleaner

    That was fast. If the present growth rate is maintained, the Android smartphone platform will overtake Apple's by the end of the year.
    eMJayy
  • survey

    another survey that is reported by the blogosphere as fact. folks, these are not sales numbers or any other hard facts. this is a survey with a few thousand people (if not only a few hundred). please clueless pundits and bloggers, get off your lazy ass**s and provide at least some perspective.
    banned from zdnet
    • "clueless pundits and bloggers"

      @banned from zdnet

      Well, before you dismiss the survey completey, maybe you should:

      1. Fully understand the methology used, and

      2. Understand statistical sampling if used.

      Just because you happen to dislike a particular fact, does not make it any less reliable.
      Economister
      • true

        @Economister
        and therefore they should give us some information about their methodology, shouldn't they?
        banned from zdnet
      • RE: Google Android: A market share vacuum cleaner

        @banned from zdnet
        Go to the comScore site and check it out yourself. Then you may gain some street cred. Otherwise you're no different to the person you're accusing of purveying false facts.
        rikasa
  • Market share is sort of missing the point

    I hate Apple and I hate Google more. The former's tight control over everything I find distasteful, and I marvel at the all-too-real reality distortion field they cast over their customers. Google, on the other hand, is this millennium's Microsoft: a vicious competitor riding a single monopoly (online advertising revenue) to crush competitors in unrelated areas. Like MS did to WordPerfect, 123, Netscape and Realplayer, all of which were once truly great and market-leading products, by leveraging Windows, Google is slowly doing to cell phones, online mapping, online video, and other areas by leveraging search. That being said, over the near term, at least, I see Apple as being in the much stronger position, even as Android, and presumably soon Windows Phone 7, begin to encroach and even surpass their market share. The reason for this is that, at the end of the day, market share is only a means to an end, and that end is profits.<br><br>I apologize in advance for playing fast and loose with the data here, but the point is sound, I hope: By way of comparison, Apple is far-and-away the most successful seller of personal computers in the world at this time. This is despite the fact that I believe there are many, I really dont know but maybe as many as a dozen, larger sellers of computers, by volume (e.g., HP, Dell, Lenovo, Toshiba, Acer, etc.) ahead of Apple. Nevertheless, Apple takes in something like a full quarter of all PC profits.<br><br>The same is true with Android, at least for now. I am sure Google is losing money hand over fist on Android right now. Thats fine, they can afford it (possibly indefinitely) if it keeps competitors from gaining a significant platform from which to challenge them. It may even make business sense: how much money did MS have to make from IE to make crushing Netscape a good idea? Apple, on the other hand, is playing a different game. I have read expert opinions that have their market share dropping to around 10% over the next few years, while at the same time their share of cell phone profits rises to >70% of the entire mobile phone industrys. They are simply playing a different game.<br><br>Anyway, Im rooting for WebOS, which, while in the doldrums right now in terms of sales, is at least holding its own!
    x I'm tc
    • RE: Google Android: A market share vacuum cleaner

      @jdakula At the end of the day it matters that there is a platform that can be used for any purpose.
      Otherwise we are stuck with Apples ideas.
      sovok_
    • RE: Google Android: A market share vacuum cleaner

      @jdakula Dude, I can't even begin to answer how INSANELY wrong your claims about Google are. <br><br>"I am sure Google is losing money hand over fist on Android right now." Yeah, I'm not sure how you're "sure" of that. It doesn't even make sense. It's an insignificant amount of money to develop an OS for a PHONE using an existing OS as the basis. (linux/unix) They've gained tons of ad money as a result. Can you possibly be that naive???
      blueskip
  • "A market share vacuum cleaner"?

    I that a subtle way of saying that Android sucks?
    doodlius
    • Wouldn't you rather suck than get sucked into Google's cleaner?

      @doodlius <br><br>I would.
      OS Reload
    • RE: Google Android: A market share vacuum cleaner

      @doodlius Well since it's much better than Apple's offering, I'm not sure where that leaves Apple. I suppose you could say Apple blows? That "would" fit.
      blueskip
  • I'd say Android sucks more like a black hole than a vaccum cleaner

    A vacuum cleaner lets you recover something that got sucked while Android, just like a black hole, sucks it for good.<br><br>Once the iPhone market share gets sucked by android it's final, there'll be no going back.

    Steve Jobs is reliving the old Mac vs Windows story, but on mobile this time.
    OS Reload
    • All Apple needs to do is .....

      ... support any carrier.

      Even with the many flavors of android phones in the market, most non-AT&T customers are drooling for an iPhone.
      wackoae
      • All Apple needs to do is .....

        @wackoae,<br><br>Not me...I switch from RIM (BlackBerry Storm...sucked) to Android (Droid X...rocks). I'm perfectly happy without the iPhone. I think that's the point; Android devices are actually competitive with the iPhone.
        bmonsterman