Google picks Kansas City for high-speed fiber network

Google picks Kansas City for high-speed fiber network

Summary: Google brings high-speed fiber Internet infrastructure to Kansas City. Next stop: the rest of America.

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Last year, Google announced a competition in which the nation's cities would compete against each other for a high-speed fiber network.

The idea: get a jump on the U.S. government's National Broadband Plan, with a little private-sector panache.

The plan: bring fiber to American homes and make their Internet "100 times faster."

At the time, Google wrote:

Imagine sitting in a rural health clinic, streaming three-dimensional medical imaging over the web and discussing a unique condition with a specialist in New York. Or downloading a high-definition, full-length feature film in less than five minutes. Or collaborating with classmates around the world while watching live 3-D video of a university lecture. Universal, ultra high-speed Internet access will make all this and more possible.

On Wednesday, the company named its winner: Kansas City, Kansas.

Google has signed a development agreement with the city, in which it says it will be able to build its fiber network efficiently, with community impact and with long-term relationships with local organizations such as the Kauffman Foundation, KCNext and the University of Kansas Medical Center.

Google plans to offer service as early as 2012. Indeed, this will likely be the first in a string of urban infrastructure projects across the nation by the company.

Here's a look in a video about the project:

"Data is like oxygen." In 2011, it's never more true.

Reposted from SmartPlanet's Smart Takes blog.

Topics: Broadband, Google, Networking, Telcos

Andrew Nusca

About Andrew Nusca

Andrew Nusca is a former writer-editor for ZDNet and contributor to CNET. During his tenure, he was the editor of SmartPlanet, ZDNet's sister site about innovation.

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9 comments
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  • kill the cable monopoly

    It's the end for Comcast, and FIOS. So much for the cable TV monopolies.
    edwardallen
    • Very premature, aren't you?

      n/t
      adornoe
    • So, let's give Google control of the content and delivery system

      at the same time.

      You're not only premature, but very shortsighted too.
      adornoe
  • RE: Google picks Kansas City for high-speed fiber network

    Since all of Google's "free" apps and services are designed to spy on their users, does this mean that Google will be able to spy on all internet traffic in Kansas City? HTTPS everywhere cannot come quickly enough.
    jorjitop
  • This is nothing new.

    We knew this was going to happen in KC for a year now. It was first mentioned around this time last year when Topeka "changed" it's name to "Google". Remember that? And then back in the fall, there were articles floating around talking about Kansas getting the fastest fiber optic network soon.
    Bates_
  • I wish them well

    This comes up the same week AT&T announces they are switching to a metered internet. I can't wait to get rid of AT&T.
    20kwfence
  • Somehow

    I doubt the big telcos will allow google to do anything... google has no expertise on this field, even if they google how to start this they will get sites full of spam and ads..
    Hasam1991
    • Google & Sprint kissing in a tree...

      @Hasam1991,

      What you forget is that this is in Sprint's backyard. Sprint's headquarters is just a few miles away and they lead the way with fiber deployment for telecommunications. Also, Sprint and Google have a number of business arrangements such as selling Google phones, other Android based phones, integration of Sprint cell numbers with Google Voice, both are investors in the 4G venture Clearwire (Sprint is the majority stock holder), etc.
      -- Aphinity --
      aphinity
      • RE: Google picks Kansas City for high-speed fiber network

        @aphinity That would not surprise me at all. Sprint's campus is in Overland Park but from talking with people that live in the surround area they suspect they will get the service fairly quickly as well.
        non-biased