Google-Sun mash up, Web 2.0 and more (The Dan & David Show)

Google-Sun mash up, Web 2.0 and more (The Dan & David Show)

Summary: In this latest episode of the Dan & David Show, we discuss the Google-Sun mash and I tell tales from my excursion at the Web 2.0 conference, where Google was a persistent elephant in the room, Microsoft execs sketched out its 2.

SHARE:
TOPICS: Enterprise 2.0
2

In this latest episode of the Dan & David Show, we discuss the Google-Sun mash and I tell tales from my excursion at the Web 2.0 conference, where Google was a persistent elephant in the room, Microsoft execs sketched out its 2.0 strategy, so-called Web 2.0 products were highlighted and former Hollywood moguls Yahoo's Terry Semel and IAC's Barry Diller held court. David continues his rant about DRM, which he calls digital restriction management. applications.  All this and more in about 20 minutes that can be delivered directly to your desktop or MP3 player if you're subscribed to our podcasts (See ZDNet’s podcasts: How to tune in), or if you want you can just download the MP3.  Let us know what you think.  

Topic: Enterprise 2.0

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

2 comments
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • You have no backbone...

    I have every reason to believe that web-based applications will (sooner than we think) truly transform our desktops and cell phones -- all the Web 2.0 hype virtually declares this as a given.

    However the biggest spoils will be won by the ones who can provide the best infrastructure and "killer app" protocols on which to run it all. The recent flurry of activity of these companies buying up "dark" fiber optic backbone networks is telling.

    If this is all true, then here's the "killer app" needed for Web 2.0:

    1) a massively parallel global supercomputer running applications in real time directly over the internet, where every single computer/ mobile device on the globe can be synchronized to every other computer at the most basic computational level, regardless of its geographical location;

    2) stop-less, synchronized/ continuous data flow over the internet -- no more latency (from packet-switching) on the web;

    3) multiple discrete, inherently secure data "channels";

    Don't believe it? Just read this:

    LINK TO PATENT ON THE USPTO WEBSITE:

    http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?patentnumber=6324586
    DenverGEEKS
    • backbone

      So you have the patent....any progresss??
      dbfarber