Hospital confirms Steve Jobs transplant

Hospital confirms Steve Jobs transplant

Summary: The hospital where Steve Jobs received a liver transplant issued a press release tonight, confirming - with Jobs permission - the transplant. The hospital said Jobs received the transplant because was the sickest patient on the waiting list at the time a donor organ became available.

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TOPICS: Health, Apple
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The hospital where Steve Jobs received a liver transplant issued a press release tonight, confirming - with Jobs permission - the transplant. The hospital said Jobs received the transplant because was the sickest patient on the waiting list at the time a donor organ became available. But more importantly, the statement noted that Jobs is "recovering well and has an excellent prognosis."

It was widely reported that Jobs returned to work at Apple's Cupertino, Calif. headquarters this week.

The full statement reads:

James D. Eason, M.D., program director at Methodist University Hospital Transplant Institute and chief of transplantation confirmed today, with the patient's permission, that Steve Jobs received a liver transplant at Methodist University Hospital Transplant Institute in partnership with the University of Tennessee in Memphis.

Mr. Jobs underwent a complete transplant evaluation and was listed for transplantation for an approved indication in accordance with the Transplant Institute policies and United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) policies.

He received a liver transplant because he was the patient with the highest MELD score (Model for End-Stage Liver Disease) of his blood type and, therefore, the sickest patient on the waiting list at the time a donor organ became available. Mr. Jobs is now recovering well and has an excellent prognosis.

The Methodist University Hospital Transplant Institute performed 120 liver transplants in 2008 making it one of the ten largest liver transplant centers in the United States. We provide transplants to patients regardless of race, sex, age, financial status, or place of residence. Our one year patient and graft survival rates are among the best in the nation and were a dominant reason in Mr. Jobs’s choice of transplant centers. We respect and protect every patient's private health information and cannot reveal any further information on the specifics of Mr. Jobs's case.

Also see: Jobs recovering from liver transplant; re-ignites debate over privacy rights

Topics: Health, Apple

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12 comments
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  • This is news?

    Was there really anyone who up until this point didn't believe he had the transplant surgery?
    Hallowed are the Ori
    • It is when...

      people are complaining that Job's may have "bought" his new liver.

      "He received a liver transplant because he was the patient with the
      highest MELD score (Model for End-Stage Liver Disease) of his blood type
      and, therefore, the sickest patient on the waiting list at the time a donor
      organ became available."

      And also when people wish to know what his future may be.

      "Mr. Jobs is now recovering well and has an excellent prognosis."
      A Grain of Salt
      • The whole class envy based argument is moot anyway

        Liver transplants can use live donors. No doubt there were several live
        donors going through the tissue matching process (it's pretty extensive)
        when the organ became available. That's how it happened with my
        nephew. The live donor was going through the final series of tests for a
        tissue match when the liver from a 20-year old woman killed in an auto
        accident became available.

        You also may not know that if an organ donor dies, the next of kin can
        specifically pick who receives the organs if they want to.
        frgough
      • Why are people "compaining" Job's may have "bought" his new liver.

        A working liver is a commodity for which there is a demand and therefore has a value. That's how markets are made.
        Henry Miller
        • Oh, that's disgusting.

          100%
          Hallowed are the Ori
          • Nope, it's Economics 101.

            That you, for unaccountable reasons, don't like it, is immaterial.
            Henry Miller
          • You misunderstand.

            I know the practice exists.

            My revulsion is that the tone of your post sounds as if you think it's OK.
            Hallowed are the Ori
  • RE: Hospital confirms Steve Jobs transplant

    Well i hope he recovers good and can go on with hes life.Personaly i am waiting for the same transplant as him.Hopefully it will work out same way as steve.
    These operations are complicated and difficould.
    But i read alot about it and there is alot more succes latest years.
    grtz
    Longfist
  • RE: Hospital confirms Steve Jobs transplant

    I'm puzzled. He told the world when he'd return after treating his hormone imbalance and almost exactly in that stretch of time he gets a liver transplant (compatible donor is found, successful operation, no rejection...). Many have been waiting for years to find a compatible donor. I'm puzzled; I don't feel comfortable with the whole story. Don't misunderstand me I wish him to fully recover from his illness but it seems he's very lucky.
    CChello
    • He certainly hedged his bets

      by going to Tennessee, which apparently has a smaller than average waiting list and has no state residency restrictions. And since he certainly has the means to rent a villa in Tennessee for a few months to wait it out and to pay top dollar for the best doctors in the state, you can't blame him for doing so. I know I would if I had the means.
      Michael Kelly
  • RE: Hospital confirms Steve Jobs transplant

    There's one question that nobody seems to be asking: was Steve Jobs a registered organ donor?

    It's not fair to give an organ to a non-donor as long as there is a donor who needs it. But about 50% of the organs transplanted in the United States go to people who haven't agreed to donate their own organs when they die. It's no wonder there's such a large organ shortage. If organs were allocated first to organ donors, more people would agree to donate and fewer people would die waiting for transplants.

    Anyone who would like to donate their organs to other organ donors can join LifeSharers at www.lifesharers.org or by calling 1-888-ORGAN88. Membership is free. There is no age limit, parents can enroll their minor children, and no one is excluded due to any pre-existing medical condition.
    dju316
    • Likely he is now...

      Odds are good that like Phil Lesh, whether or not he was a donor he'll stump for donors henceforth.
      epcraig