How to recycle rain water for use at home

How to recycle rain water for use at home

Summary: Looking for ways to cut down on your water usage? Homeowners Steve and Linda Parker have installed a rainwater catchment system that allows them to collect rainwater to recycle in their California home.

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TOPICS: Tech Industry
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Looking for ways to cut down on your water usage? Homeowners Steve and Linda Parker have installed a rainwater catchment system that allows them to collect rainwater to recycle in their California home. Since installing the system they've collected about 3,000 to 4,000 gallons of water to re-use for their laundry and their toilets.

Topic: Tech Industry

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  • RE: How to recycle rain water for use at home

    From the clip: "Make sure you get a permit... some states have banned rainwater collection in the past"

    Sad, just sad. I can't believe you would need permission to collect rainwater. Time for a revolution.
    tora201
    • RE: How to recycle rain water for use at home

      Permits are more for safety than anything.
      choyongpil
      • RE: How to recycle rain water for use at home

        @choyongpil

        No, permits are another way to be nickle and dimed by a government in ruin.
        Rob.sharp
    • RE: How to recycle rain water for use at home

      @tora201 Reservoirs of untreated still water can potentially breed mosquitoes and other disease-carrying pests, so they need to be regulated. There are already sanitary codes and standards for swimming pools.
      Tech watcher
      • RE: How to recycle rain water for use at home

        @Tech watcher
        You are speaking about public pools?
        choyongpil
      • RE: How to recycle rain water for use at home

        @Tech watcher

        There is a big difference between person collecting rain water on their private property (their home) and commercial sized/applicable "reservoirs". Regulation over anything commercial that affects persons is not in question here it is the invasion of government on an individual?s private property that is.

        Government regulation is like fire, it?s hard to control (or more appropriately keep from getting out of control) and can have devastating consequences so it should be used sparingly and when appropriate.
        BlueCollarCritic
    • Need permission to collect rainwater

      @tora201
      The western states have longstanding legal structures regarding water rights. California gets some water from Colorado and in Colorado the legal rights to water are strongly enforced. A rainwater collection system would violate other people's water rights in most parts of Colorado.
      stevee52
      • RE: How to recycle rain water for use at home

        @stevee52

        Just because some states are dependent on other states for water because said states population choose to live in an area that cannot supply in sufficient supply, water to its residents without, does not give that state or its citizens the right to impose over reaching government regulation on others just so those in the dry states don't have to deal with the issues of water shortages.

        It?s one thing to live in an area that normally has sufficient water for its residents and is going thru a dry spell and those places like those nar the desert where anyone with half a brain realizes there is NOT enough water to supply the local needs.

        In our country our form of government, a representative Republic, is supposed to protect the rights of the few against the many as well as the rights of the many against the few and the way you determine who is in the right when there is conflict is by examining what rights the individual has as outlined in the Constitution and I can tell you that there is no defined right to water from neighboring areas if your own area is unable to supply its needs.

        In this case those states with a known water deficiency DO NOT have the right enforce their will or needs upon others. That?s not to say other surrounding areas should not help out their neighbors in need but that this MUST BE VOLUNTARY else we are no better than a socialist run state.
        BlueCollarCritic
      • RE: How to recycle rain water for use at home

        @BlueCollarCritic
        What it is is that the water rights were bought. If for example, X bought the rights to the water in a certain drainage from Y, then Y sold the land to Z, Z cannot put in a dam or in any other way collect and hold the water. It's not a matter of overreaching regulation, but an "I bought it, don't steal it" matter. Doesn't matter if it's individuals, corporations, cities, or states. If you buy a house where the water or mineral rights have been sold, it's going to be listed in the paperwork somewhere.
        kevinrs1
  • Re-inventing the wheel?

    People in what many call "Third-World Countries" have been doing this since before recorded history. It's even done in modern Spain and they put Goldfish in open depositos to eat nasty ooglies. If rainwater collection is prohibited in your state your really do need a revolution!
    grax
    • RE: How to recycle rain water for use at home

      @grax

      Amen grax. Some people can't see beyond their own desires. I choose not to live in or beside a desert precisely because of issues of water supply. That does not mean I do not have empathy for those in need but that I have despise for those who would use government to force others to provide for them.
      BlueCollarCritic
  • Terrible Return

    10 years == Break Even
    Way too long.
    Make it 3 years and no maintenance ... Sold
    Hal_9001
  • RE: How to recycle rain water for use at home

    Interesting debat.
    Each country has different laws and regulations.
    In France, the cost of city water includes 2 expenses: A/ cost for cleanning
    the supplied water B/ cost for cleanning the the duty water collected by the
    drains.
    Whenever a french citizen collects rain water and reject it after toilet use
    and/or laudry, he should measure the amount of water and pay the 'cleaning'
    costs, just like 'purchased' water. This does not apply when rain water is
    use to water the garden.
    jcqs.bchrd@...
    • RE: How to recycle rain water for use at home

      @jcqs.bchrd@... Same here in Niagara Region in Canada. Over 50% of the monthly water bill, is a sewage surcharge, averages about $100 CDN ($103 USD) based on your water meter. If one was to collect rainwater for toilets and laundry etc and send it down the sewer one can face a major fine if caught. However the reverse is not true. Metered water used to say water your lawn & garden, fill or top up pool, wash car, etc. your still paying that full sewage surcharge. The only areas where cisterns are allowed if your in rural area where there is no sewer system and you have a septic system.
      csumbler
      • RE: How to recycle rain water for use at home

        @csumbler
        Sewage charges are in many municipalities based on the water consumption during the winter months. Hence added water use during the summer for irrigation does not impact your sewage bill.
        wellcraft19
  • Already use barrels to collect rain water

    Seattle summers are VERY dry and a lot of water is needed for irrigation - if wanting to keep a green yard.

    We use a barrels and diverts the water from the downspouts. Total cost probably less than $200.
    Added fee for conservative use of (municipal) water in the summer (=grey yard) ~$30, liberal use for a green yard, ~$70. Hence, payback in about three years.
    wellcraft19
  • RE: How to recycle rain water for use at home

    In this area, we have to buy a deduct meter, hook it to our outside tap, and report it every two months to the township that handles our sewerage.
    If we don't get the meter, they do allow us a "credit" for "lawn watering", but not until the following spring.
    JTF243@...
  • RE: How to recycle rain water for use at home

    Check out Wikipedia under Rainwater Collection - Around the World. They even talk about the 2009 change in Colorado law that allows for rainwater collection. Also, research the systems used in Bermuda & the Virgin Islands.
    wagiera
  • RE: How to recycle rain water for use at home

    I live on Hawai'i, the Big Island. On much of the island there is no "city" water available. We are on catchment and have a septic tank. There is a monthly cost though. You gotta get the water from the tank to the house - electric pumps do use a lot of electricity. You have to be conscious of that pump running every time you turn on the water. An additional little issue is that if the power is out, you have no water. Makes life interesting. We have covers for the tanks to prevent the mosquito takeovers. We also add bleach to the tank once a month. You also have the cost of the filtration systems and filter cartridges. We get drinkable water though. Its super soft, so you use less laundry soap, and your skin and hair love it. It never occurred to me that some states would outlaw catchment, and I have lived in other states besides Hawai'i. It's just probably not as practical other places as it is in East Hawai'i where we get over 100 inches of rain a year. When i was a kid in Montana we always had a rain barrel that we used to water the garden. Then when I was a little older and there was a drought we were reusing our bath and dish water for the garden and toilets. The city mailed out pamphlets on how to capture and use grey-water safely. Sewer fees are a necessity that even catchement users should abide by. We have to clean the waste water or risk sliding back in time to the days of cholera etc.
    beersjl
  • Rain Water Collection is NOTHING compared to China's taking of our water

    For those of you in favor of government regulation of Rain Water collection, you need to wake up from your fantasy. The problem isn?t with Mr & Mrs Smith collecting too much rain water form their private property but with the purchase of utilities and mineral rights by foreign entities thanks to recent changes by the government in ownership of resources by foreign entities.

    As of current China is stealing water from aquifers like the one near the great lakes. They are extracting water from the great lakes at a pace that is faster than the water is replenished by nature and this is proven fact so you can drop the attempted ?that?s a conspiracy theory? comment as it holds no water; no pun intended. They transport the water in large commercial grade bags the size of snips that are chained together like a long train. You can find pictures of it on the internet. I can?t recall the technical name for these plastic containers that are chained together but their like large IV bags made of industrial grade material.

    Some will laugh and say ?conspiracy theory? and that?s fine if you want to continue living in denial but if you?re ready to do something of real value then instead of hassling your neighbors rain water collection you should join the fight to stop the selloff of our water to overseas interest. You think its bad now to be dependent on another state for your water, just wait till we?re dependent on other countries because our politicians sold off all our water behind our backs and are now on some beach in South America living the good life.
    BlueCollarCritic