IBM vs. Microsoft: It's apparently more than just water under the bridge

IBM vs. Microsoft: It's apparently more than just water under the bridge

Summary: Both InfoWorld and eWeek are reporting on how five companies are backing the European Union's crackdown on Microsoft. It's not surprising to see Microsoft arch enemies such as Nokia, Oracle, Real Networks and Red Hat publicly coming out against the Redmond, WA-based company.

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TOPICS: IBM
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Both InfoWorld and eWeek are reporting on how five companies are backing the European Union's crackdown on Microsoft. It's not surprising to see Microsoft arch enemies such as Nokia, Oracle, Real Networks and Red Hat publicly coming out against the Redmond, WA-based company. But to see ex-bedfellow IBM as one of the supporters is a pretty good sign that whatever cooperative spirit once existed between the two companies during the birth of Web services (the infamous alliance scared the daylights out of plenty of vendors) is now officially converted into bad blood. Something apparently got underneath IBM's skin. Could it be last year's watershed kiss-and-makeup deal between Microsoft and Sun? Dating back to the days when Microsoft and IBM were so strongly allied, I repeatedly contended that the two companies' we're after the same thing: to interoperate with each other and then steal each others customers. In a story that's now a little more than two years old, I likened the soap opera to a Clint Eastwood spaghetti Western:

"Picture Clint Eastwood (IBM) and Lee Van Cleef (Microsoft) in one of those spaghetti westerns where each sees an opportunity to hit pay dirt, but they have to work together if either is going to have a chance at the booty....Not only that, they'll have to trick the rest of the West's most notorious gunslingers (BEA, Oracle, Sun, etc.) into helping them. Ultimately, though, Eastwood and Van Cleef have no intention of splitting the loot--not with the other bad guys and certainly not with each other. Both know that they'll have to kill the bandeleros once they've served their purpose (industry-wide support for XML, SOAP, WSDL, UDDI and other Web services specifications). Then they'll have a death match of their own."

It appears as though the death match has begun.

Topic: IBM

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  • There is an ocean under the bridge

    IBM just plain never got over how when it asked MS to dig its own grave by developing OS/2, MS managed to turn things around and not only remained the OS provider for the PC with Windows: MS managed to outright steal the PC market right from under IBM?s nose. Also, the fact that no matter what IBM and others seem to throw at MS, MS manages to adapt and keep on going, only adds to IBM?s irritation with MS.

    IBM?s latest major effort at turning OSS against MS (which should have been a doozie) has all but failed, as OSS? is now losing its appeal over Windows. There really is no business advantage now to using Linux over Windows. Windows is more reliable, more secure, easier to use, easier and better to develop applications for, has better TCO, etc. In addition to all of this, .Net has managed to knock the wind out Java, and MS is now charging IBM?s Websphere development ecosystem with every intention of knocking it down. It is of little surprise then to find IBM resorting to its most effective method to date of causing pain for MS: making more antitrust trouble for the software giant.
    P. Douglas
    • Beat me to it

      That's exactly what I was going to say. It's downright odd that a lot of people seem to think this IBM v. IBM feud is recent. That's usually about when we gather 'round the old CRT and talk about when there was an OS2 key in the NT registry and how it got there. :-)
      Tert
  • sensationalising

    I just think IBM and Apple for example, Grokk free/open software, as do amazon, google, etc etc.

    Sun and microsoft in a quixotically attempt to stem the tide instead of surfing the wave.

    Clearly Sun's new management are still in a timewarp.

    I think web services seemed like a great idea a few years ago, and Microsoft and IBM worked collectively on standards.
    But then microsoft screwed it all up by talking about patents, and showing how they didn't grok Free/Open software at all, in doing so, harpooing web services for a lot of people.

    A few years down the line now, web services seem like a huge fat overkill, giving no practical advantage over say CORBA.
    And then, there is PHP. A few lines of PHP and you've got XML going into and coming from your database.

    So who needs web services?
    hipparchus2000
  • SCO Lawsuit?

    Maybe pay-back for the part Microsoft played in lining up funding for SCO for the IBM Linux lawsuit?
    xyxy