Irony of the day: Steve Jobs rails against walled gardens?

Irony of the day: Steve Jobs rails against walled gardens?

Summary: In researching today's earlier blog post (about Apple and the fine line between journalists and bloggers it may have erased), I came across a post that's a little more than a year old by John Battelle (about Apple suing bloggers).

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TOPICS: Apple
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In researching today's earlier blog post (about Apple and the fine line between journalists and bloggers it may have erased), I came across a post that's a little more than a year old by John Battelle (about Apple suing bloggers).  In it, Battelle led off with:

Last night Steve Jobs gave a great interview with Kara [Swisher] and Walt [Mossberg], and I was with him for most of it - with him as he railed against the walled gardens of cable and mobile phone operators, with him as he showed really cool new iTunes/RSS/Podcasting integration, with him as he dodged questions about whether Apple was going to get into the video market.

Railed against the walled gardens of cable and mobile phone operators? Boy, if this isn't a case of tea-kettle-black, I don't know what is.  At the time, Apple was erecting what, to this day, is one of the most dangerous and proprietary walled gardens in all of technology (with the walls being based on Apple's proprietary FairPlay digital rights management technology -- what I call C.R.A.P.: see CRAP, The Movie and CRAP, The Sequel).  What a hypocrite (Jobs, not Battelle).

Topic: Apple

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4 comments
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  • Agreed

    Jobs is in no position to attack media operators. Apple's DRM (call it what you want) is not good for Apple, the consumer or the content providers... it's basically a state of insanity. All parties, including consumers, are tolerating this horrific IP safeguard that isn't really a safeguard... it's moronic. Of course copyright holders deserve protection, but this is not the way to go about their business. We need some sort of streamlined protection for content providers to use... Apple's DRM is cutting it, and it never will.

    Of course, there's always the magnatune model for companies to look at, but that might make too much sense.

    http://opendomain.blogspot.com
    opensourcepro
  • No surprise, really

    In 2002, Jobs publicly stated:
    "If you legally acquire music, you need to have the right to manage it on all other devices that you own."

    Kind of different than his current tune, no doubt.
    tic swayback
    • Well, his current tune is restricted by DRM...

      ...so you can hardly expect him to share it.
      dave.leigh@...
  • Definite irony

    Walled gardens are what Apple has been all about since its founding (I can think of no other hardware vendor that produces an OS delibrately locked to its own hardware; Apple's practice from the beginning). Admittedly, they were no different than any other computer vendor in that regard in 1979-1980, but vendor lock-in does seem to be slowly dying (contrary to the best efforts of companies like MS, HP, and Apple) may it rest in peace.
    John L. Ries