Is the gaming industry about to be rocked by graphics technology 100,000-times more efficient?

Is the gaming industry about to be rocked by graphics technology 100,000-times more efficient?

Summary: Euclideon claims to have harnessed the atom for graphics technology, replacing current-day usage of polygons and enhancing graphics by 100,000-times.

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TOPICS: Mobility
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On August 1, Australian company Euclideon posted a video to YouTube which presages their technology as being the future of not just the gaming industry, but the world of graphics in general. Dubbed the "unlimited detail" method, have a look at the 7-minute-long video below which explains the method and how their polygon-to-atom converter aims to make game developer's lives easier and reshape an entire graphics industry:

 

Did you catch the part where they said, "...in one cubic meter of dirt, we have more polygons than you will find in any game that doesn't use procedural generation."? Naturally, there are plenty of skeptics and for good reason. Year-in and year-out, we see incredibly impressive graphics demos from companies like NVIDIA that showcase unprecedented levels of realism, yet when it comes to implementing these graphics in a real-time game setting, those impressive demos remain just that; impressive demos. Likewise, remember when Sony released the PS3 and they stood upon the highest of mountains proclaiming the unlimited potential of the cell architecture? Yeah, that kind of turned into a disappointment pretty fast where using it for a gaming platform is concerned. Are we dealing with a similar scenario here? After all, we're not given any specs or any idea as to how much horsepower is required to achieve these "unlimited detail" graphics. And if we're talking running this type of technology in a gaming capacity, then you have to start adding in everything else that makes a game a powerhouse, such as audio, AI, game-play, networking, animation/in-motion objects (moving trees, water, dynamic lighting, etc.), physics, and so on and so forth. Granted, with efficiency gains of around 100,000, that leaves plenty of room for taking games as they are now and giving them a MASSIVE face-lift without affecting -- or maybe even enhancing -- performance. But that's if those gains are based on a 1:1 (or less) ratio where modern-day hardware is concerned. With that said, I'm certainly willing to give Euclideon the benefit of the doubt. The presentation given in the video makes sense, and though these types of gains in technology don't happen very often, it seems we've been given enough to go on for the time being to at least stay tuned. If true and successful, this technology stands a good chance at becoming the baseline for all future iterations of gaming graphics -- be it PC, console, hand-held, or any other industry that uses polygonal technology. Lastly, it appears they have more than just graphics up their sleeve, as hinted in their video description:
We also have another piece of technology that isn't graphics, but does something game related that's also pretty clever, but we'll keep that secret for now.
At the very least, Euclideon appears to be an ambitious company with forward-thinking ideas. What do you think about them, though? Does this seem like just a bunch of hot air to you or do you think Euclideon has really pulled off a marvelous feat of graphical innovation? Let us know your thoughts below! -Stephen Chapman
SEO Whistleblower
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Topic: Mobility

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27 comments
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  • Looking for venture capitol, I'll bet.

    This is what you do, make an impressive video (sales pitch) then look for funding to try and make it happen via R&D.
    William Farrell
    • RE: Is the gaming industry about to be rocked by graphics technology 100,000-times more efficient?

      @William Farrell very true - have you tried this yourself?
      jerang1
      • Might be this, and might be real

        @jerang@...
        DDERSSS
    • Message has been deleted.

      davidfrankk
    • RE: Is the gaming industry about to be rocked by graphics technology 100,000-times more efficient?

      The gamming industry has been lazy since they left
      pcs for the most part to write games only for under powered and baddly done graphics. any good graphic pc can run circles around the best consoles.
      rparker009
      • Not lazy just keen observers of the market.

        @rparker009 The problem with PC's vs. Consoles is console interfaces are less bulky for games. It's not necessarily a lazy industry so much as it is lazy gamers. Gamers don't want to have to map a bunch of keys. These days my computer gaming, and thus most of my graphics workload, is relegated to MMORPG type games that have several keys that need to be utilized as opposed to an FPS where the keyboard and mouse, formerly the king of FPS control schemes, has given way to the much crisper control of console controllers. Fewer people are utilizing their PC's for gaming and game makers are keenly aware of this. They are in it to make money and the money is in consoles now not PC games.
        Str0b0
  • RE: Is the gaming industry about to be rocked by graphics technology 100,000-times more efficient?

    If you notice there are no moving 3D models in that static video. Trying to code a FPS game in that would take petabytes of information to process. Good luck with that...
    ewell44
    • You are 100% correct

      @ewell44

      This is 100% correct, there has already been a published response on what would be required to get this working from a hardware perspective with any semblance of motion.
      http://notch.tumblr.com/post/8386977075/its-a-scam
      ploco9
      • RE: Is the gaming industry about to be rocked by graphics technology 100,000-times more efficient?

        @ploco@...

        Here is his response to criticism the next day (Aug 3rd). He concedes points and also gives them kudos on a few of their concepts.

        http://notch.tumblr.com/post/8423008802/but-notch-its-not-a-scam
        pc_techs_ct
    • Yup

      If it has 100,000 times more detail don't you have to design in greater detail as well? Somebody has to design the shape of those little rocks and pine needles now.
      Tigertank
      • RE: Is the gaming industry about to be rocked by graphics technology 100,000-times more efficient?

        @Tigertank @ewell44 @ploco@... you are all Luddites. Moore's Law is still valid and nanotech appplies as well... and yes, we'll need humans to design the pine needles. Article referenced correctly points out that we don't currently have the technology. But that's what Progress is all about eh? "They" also once said that we had overbuilt our fiber-optic network a few years ago. M'kay.
        pc_techs_ct
      • RE: Is the gaming industry about to be rocked by graphics technology 100,000-times more efficient?

        @Tigertank
        Yeah, but typically that would only have to be done once. After that, you would just look through your toolbox for a rock/tree/brick/etc... scale to size and place in world.
        Salty Dog
  • RE: Is the gaming industry about to be rocked by graphics technology 100,000-times more efficient?

    Just sounds too good to be true. Show me da money, as they say. Sample code, CPU requirements, memory requirements, that's what'll make or break this.
    stanaaa4
    • RE: Is the gaming industry about to be rocked by graphics technology 100,000-times more efficient?

      @stan@... yes! Release the code! Give up your secrets, your patents and your future! NAOW!
      pc_techs_ct
  • Gaming Platforms are broken

    It's not so much the hardware that is limiting. It's the software and development platform. <br><br>When I last dealt with the industry, the PS2 Dev kit was $30k, and was a 2U rack mount server that looked like a PS2. The XBOX Dev kit was $10k, but looked like an xbox though set to debug mode. <br><br>Developers had an extremely hard time developing on the Sony PSx platform, and it took 3yrs before they were able to capitalize on its hardware. <br><br>But Corporate schedules pushed for a game to hit certain milestones, and be ready for distribution by XX date. So it was more about pushing through levels, debugging, and getting it out the door, then it was about optimizing for the platform...<br><br>Who cares if there is some great improvement in the quality, as it'll be years before developers are able to latch on and maximize its potential.
    unredeemed
    • Wasn't the XBox 360 Dev Kit is a PowerMac G5? [nt]

      [nt]
      olePigeon
      • I do not understand what it is you are attempting to convay?

        @olePigeon
        Tim Cook
  • RE: Is the gaming industry about to be rocked by graphics technology 100,000-times more efficient?

    Too many open questions regarding the feasability of this technology to make an objective assessment.
    JayAmbrose
  • RE: Is the gaming industry about to be rocked by graphics technology 100,000-times more efficient?

    Was it me or did the "leading brand" graphics engine that was shown in comparison look like circa 2002?
    When was the last time a current game rendered a tree trunk with only 5 sides? It looked worse than the original Halo.
    Tigertank
  • RE: Is the gaming industry about to be rocked by graphics technology 100,000-times more efficient?

    Notch, the maker of Minecraft and somebody who is familiar with this type of algorithm as well as procedural generation, warns that this is not as it seems, and has significant drawbacks:

    http://notch.tumblr.com/
    CobraA1