Is Virgin Records destined to repeat Sony's rootkit history?

Is Virgin Records destined to repeat Sony's rootkit history?

Summary: Cory Doctorow on Boing Boing (thanks to ZDNet reader Bruce Fryer for the link): Coldplay's latest CD X&Y comes with an insert that discloses all the rules enforced by the DRM they included on the disc. Of course, these rules are only visible after you've paid for the CD.

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TOPICS: Legal
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Cory Doctorow on Boing Boing (thanks to ZDNet reader Bruce Fryer for the link):

Coldplay's latest CD X&Y comes with an insert that discloses all the rules enforced by the DRM they included on the disc. Of course, these rules are only visible after you've paid for the CD.

A reminder: once you open a CD, you can't return it.  Hey Eliot (Spitzer, NY AG), doesn't this break some sort of contract law?  Or, have the end user license agreements (EULAs) that typically can't be seen until after software is purchased set a really ugly precedent.  A digital photo of Virgin's rules is included with Doctorow's post.  Imagine if Congress acted on behalf of The People instead of the recording or motion picture industries and passed a law requiring the posting of such notices on the outside of the CD so as to warn the buyer before the purchase is made.  Imagine how much that would cost the recording industry (the packaging would have to change).  Perhaps there'll be a day when we can't see the warranty for the cars we buy until after we buy them.

Topic: Legal

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3 comments
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  • Information overload

    Go ahead and post a 15 page document on the front of the CD - will anyone read it? And if they did, would it stop them from playing the music? I'm sure it would push up prices as those 15 page docs do cost real money.

    Just what are you really trying to do here? It looks like you just want to throw out a speedbump to slow down the government "machine" - NOT to do anyone a favor. Litigation progress control . . .
    Roger Ramjet
    • Maybe not

      Maybe there are a few simpletons who don't wish to be informed about limitations being placed on them before they spend their hard-earned money. But I do want to know exactly what I'm spending my money on.

      Either they prominently display a listing of all of the artificial limitations on the cover or they mandate that stores must accept returns.

      Consumer protections don't seem to be a priority for those we elected to do the "People's business".
      Tim Patterson
  • One of your better comments

    I like the idea of the EULA or licensing agreement posted publicly for all to see.

    What Virgin et al. should do is have a website setup that displays all their EULAs for all products.

    Arthas
    JamesNT