Mashup Camp: the unconference about the uncomputer

Mashup Camp: the unconference about the uncomputer

Summary: Under the questionable rubric of "Web 2.0" (see my treatise on the uncomputer), there have been a lot of events that, if you ask me, run incredibly counter to this new culture of open API provision and mashup development.

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TOPICS: Enterprise 2.0
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Under the questionable rubric of "Web 2.0" (see my treatise on the uncomputer), there have been a lot of events that, if you ask me, run incredibly counter to this new culture of open API provision and mashup development.  They involve technology executives talking to large audiences in a traditional, highly commercialized conference format and they don't involve the sort of quality face time between the people doing the real work; the ones who are already driving this wave of innovation -- the mashup artists and the API architects themselves. Sure, the content at these conferences (some of which are strangely invitation-only) is interesting.

But if you want to experience the real excitement that the uncomputer is bringing about, then we need a completely different event.  One that not only includes the real innovators, artists, and architects, but one that ditches the talking-head format in favor of the much more productive and engaging unconference format.  So, right now, I'm working on making that event a reality.  For example, while many of you were Christmas shopping, I was busy domain shopping and I picked up the domain mashupcamp.com (it's not live yet, but I hope to turn the lights on soon). 

My goal for Mashup Camp is to do the opposite of what all these other Web 2.0-esque conferences are doing.  It won't be invitation only.  The pilot event will be modest in size guaranteeing intimacy and low or perhaps even no cost to attend (perfect for some of the people doing the real innovation on a low budget).  And, it will involve a mix of open networking time, leader-facilitated discussions that address some of the most important issues and concerns that the API providers and the mashup artists actually need to work out, and fun (for example, a hottest mashup contest with an even hotter prize).  

If you develop mashups, have APIs that mashup developers should know about, or have an interest that's tangentially connected with the mashup culture and want to know more about Mashup Camp please contact me at david.berlind@cnet.com.  Given its grassroots nature, I can also use some assistance in organizing Mashup Camp. Everything from site preparation (the first one will be in the Bay Area) to volunteers to lead the discussions.  So, please don't hesitate to contact me for that too.  Thanks and have great holiday.  [Tagged @ Technorati as and ]

Topic: Enterprise 2.0

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  • Top ten reasons why "Live" software stinks...

    1) I like my computer/programs to run even when I am not connected to the internet.(usually on my laptop)
    2) I dont want to pay a monthly service charge for using a program I have already bought.
    3) Programs running locally will always be faster and more feature rich than a web based program.(Just look at Gmail vs Thunderbird)
    4) I like my privacy, with the service computing model, its too easy for companies to invade my privacy.
    5) Today, when you buy a program, you OWN it. With the service model, they can change the license agreement at will.
    6) I dont want my computer to fail just because someone else is having a problem with their computers.
    7) I dont want my software to lag because too many people are hitting the servers simultaneously.
    8) Every time software is updated, there is the potential for something to go wrong. I will update when I WANT to update. Or in other words, "If it aint broke, dont fix it".
    9) DRM benefits big business and does NOTHING for consumers except cause headaches.
    10) Each program that wants outbound/inbound access is a potential security risk. Using Zonealarm, I refuse access except for programs that I trust that need it.(Such as Firefox, Thunderbird, anti-virus, etc) Have you ever wondered why Windows Media Player needs to make an outbound request each time you play a video/song??? Hmmmm....
    xunil skcor
    • Good points, but not fair to Windows Media

      I completely agree with your 10 points, but you're making something out of nothing with Windows Media. We're not talking about Real Player here which IS absolutely confirmed as spyware not to mention that it has the most annoying habit of taking over all your file extensions no matter how much you try to disable it short of uninstalling Real. Windows media player gives you the choice when you first load it up to choose whether you wish to transmit data to the Internet or not. There is no secret about this and you CAN opt out.
      george_ou
  • Interesting post on live software <a href="www.anteyi.com">&#23433;&#29305;&#26131;</a>

    I am not sure I can agree with what Dave suggested in the post. For more stuff that may or may not be helpful for wireless access of live software (be it RSS or ATOM or whatever), check out <a href="www.anteyi.com">&#23433;&#29305;&#26131;</a>.
    micester
  • Interesting post on live software <a href="www.anteyi.com">&#23433;&#29305;&#26131;</a>

    I am not sure I can agree with what Dave suggested in the post. For more stuff that may or may not be helpful for wireless access of live software (be it RSS or ATOM or whatever), check out <a href="www.anteyi.com">&#23433;&#29305;&#26131;</a>.
    micester