McAfee proposes five tips to avoiding bad apps

McAfee proposes five tips to avoiding bad apps

Summary: McAfee has drafted five easy steps that computer and mobile users can take to secure their own devices.

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When it comes to computer and mobile security, you really can't get enough advice -- so long as it is good advice.

McAfee has come up with five "common sense" practices that you might not have thought about before, but they actually do make sense for the most part.

Here's a look:

  • For the moment, the amount of detected smartphone malware is relatively low compared to malware that targets desktop or laptop PCs; but being aware that it exists is the first step toward protecting yourself and your data.
  • Research apps and their publishers thoroughly and check the ratings - better to install apps that are broadly used in the market and/or are recommended by your circle of friends and colleagues
  • It is wise to purchase from a well-known reputable app store market, such as the Android Market. One way for Android users to avoid installation of non-market applications is to de-select the "Unknown sources" option in the Applications Settings menu on their device. If the option is not listed, it means your mobile service provider has already done this for the user.
  • When you install an app, you'll see a list of permissions for services that are granted access to the hardware and software components on your device, like contacts, camera and location. If something in the permissions screen doesn't look right, don't install that app! For example, a game or alarm clock app probably shouldn't need to access your contacts or have the ability to transmit that data from your device.
  • Install antivirus software on your phone. It is a good idea to install an antivirus program when you get a new mobile device before you add any other apps.

This last one actually be the most crucial one that people are missing.

Although many consumers probably haven't thought about installing an antivirus app, there is definitely a prevalent threat here. A report from McAfee earlier this year argued that Android, in particular, was found to be the most vulnerable mobile operating system on the market, as malware targeted towards Google’s OS has skyrocketed 76 percent between the first and second quarters of 2011.

McAfee argues now that because smartphone and tablet sales are eclipsing those of desktops and laptops, cyber crime is surging in the mobile sector.

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Topics: Security, CXO, Malware, Software, IT Employment

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13 comments
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  • sdgdsg

    http://url188.com/1066
    hgkhgkh
  • RE: McAfee proposes five tips to avoiding bad apps

    Phones shouldn't need anti-virus apps, but with the way the Android market is set up...

    Almost makes me feel bad for Android users.


    - Sent from my (Anti-Virus free) Windows Phone. :)
    The one and only, Cylon Centurion
    • RE: McAfee proposes five tips to avoiding bad apps

      @Cylon Centurion Windows Phone is only malware free because of marketshare (ya know, the same reason Mac's don't have much malware). Simply put, Android has the biggest pie, so you're more likely to get a slice from them.
      Aerowind
    • RE: "with the way the Android market is set up"

      @Cylon Centurion
      WHAT about the way the Android market is set up?
      You mean like how the individual user is held responsible for making good decisions? Don't make me get political, here...
      You know what they said about Nazi Germany? The trains always ran on time. Oh, wait! That comment is for Apple users.
      Wait! You are on a Windows phone? What's that?!

      Uhhh, does MS even have a market?
      danindenver
  • RE: McAfee proposes five tips to avoiding bad apps

    Any advice coming from McAfee should be taken with a rather large grain of salt. Their virus detection rates are among the worst in the industry. This is MY testing by the way, not some 3rd party lab that was paid.
    smashandgrab
    • Absolutely !!!

      @smashandgrab

      I have also reached the same conclusion.
      The global top 100 company I work for did the same.

      When I see an article hosted by a company with a critical interest in the article (aka stakeholder) I skip it for more than a quick fyi - extra reading material.
      rhonin
  • McAfee recommends AV software? Gee, what a surprise. :/

    nt
    Dietrich T. Schmitz *Your
  • The easiest common-sense practice is...

    Don't install McAfee (or Norton for that matter). Theirs are a prime example of bad apps.
    luke_sg
    • RE: McAfee proposes five tips to avoiding bad apps

      @luke_sg Thank you...

      I was going to say...

      1. Don't install McAfee
      redhaven
  • Question about iPhone infection rates

    Other than the recent app that Mr. Miller got into the App store, have there been any other malware apps that have been approved in the App store?

    How about in the app store(s) for jailbroken iPhones? Are those malware infested app stores?

    It seems to me that you can pretty much ignore all the advice from McAfee and simply buy an iPhone. Then you don't have to worry about any of this.
    toddybottom
  • RE: McAfee proposes five tips to avoiding bad apps

    Nice free ad for McAfee.

    You always have to consider the risk-cost ratio with McAfee. Are you really willing to put a resource sucking hog on your phone (or computer for that matter), that will slow every other process on your device to a crawl to protect yourself on the off chance that you might get a virus? I am not.

    Here is my security plan:

    1. Be smart. There is usually a reason when something that should cost something is offered for free.
    2. Backup regularly
    3. If I screw up and get infected with something, I will wipe and reinstall the OS then take a couple of hours to reinstall apps or let them download. This happens so rarely that I can't remember the last time but probably prior to 2000.
    redhaven
  • RE: McAfee proposes five tips to avoiding bad apps

    "For example, a game or alarm clock app probably shouldn???t need to access your contacts or have the ability to transmit that data from your device."

    Except that many games try to be "social."
    CobraA1
  • RE: McAfee proposes five tips to avoiding bad apps

    "Any advice coming from McAfee should be taken with a rather large grain of salt"

    I had it with McAfee when it said that i had a malware file in a text file that I created myself. It wouldn't be so bad if they had some tech support, but when I sent them a file that I downloaded from cnet and they claimed it was malware, I had to put them on my do not buy list. Comcast has dropped them - finally. And the McAfee software allowed my work laptop to get hijacked 3 times in the last year. Doesn't happen on my home computer.
    == Lucid Lynx means Liberation! == Windows is now obsolete! ==
    danindenver