Microsoft delays, reorgs, Net neutrality and more...

Microsoft delays, reorgs, Net neutrality and more...

Summary: This week on The Dan & David Show, we discuss the delay of Windows Vista and Office 2007 and whether the reorganization at the top of the Redmond heap--shuffling the deck chairs--will impact Microsoft's face off with the emerging Web giants and ankle biters. We also discuss comments made by AT&T CEO Ed Whitacre about merging with BellSouth and about the Net Neutrality debate.

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TOPICS: Windows
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This week on The Dan & David Show, we discuss the delay of Windows Vista and Office 2007 and whether the reorganization at the top of the Redmond heap--shuffling the deck chairs--will impact Microsoft's face off with the emerging Web giants and ankle biters. We also discuss comments made by AT&T CEO Ed Whitacre about merging with BellSouth and about the Net Neutrality debate.  The podcast can be delivered directly to your desktop or MP3 player if you're subscribed to our podcasts (See ZDNet’s podcasts: How to tune in). For more the topics covered during the show, search our blog.

Topic: Windows

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4 comments
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  • Correct

    You shoyuld not use the word paradigm.
    Stephen Wheeler
  • Neutrality

    I think I may have mentioned this already, but I am a former telco exec.

    David is correct - there was some classic double-speak in the AT&T speech.

    Your war over the wires forecast missed one vital point: The Cablecos and Telcos are allies against Net Neutrality. This is really important - because if they're not, I need to be calling my fund manager to make sure I'm not exposed to any comms risk.
    Stephen Wheeler
  • Big Business, Big Costs

    If the telcos networks become toll roads [redfining the Superhighway: you can drive as fast as you like except for the stops here, and here, and here, and ...] and they charge everyone for access to each stretch of wire - everyone loses, not just small businesses and mass consumers.

    The Net grew, to a great extent, on big business's ability to use it to replace very-high-cost private networks. Putting in toll booths not only has implications for traditional 'content' (probably another of those paradigm words...) industries. Every business will be handed unequal access to customers, suppliers, countries with branches, partners, marketing space - the list just goes on and on and ... you get the picture I'm sure.
    Stephen Wheeler
  • Free Paradigm

    If you're going to use words like paradigm (even after saying, yourselves, that you shouldn't) please use them correctly.

    The Net creates a new model for interaction because it allows everyone with a PC (a low barrier to entry) to publish.

    Net neutrality's most important aspect is the designed-in Internet philosophy of equal, peer-to-peer, communication.
    That is; Free speech.

    Paradigm shifts are revolutionary movements and, like any other form of revolution, they destroy as they create the new, the better.

    Old forms of publishing have to have charge-by-use, a Prejudiced Net, to survive without changing. They, with their copyright royalties and their billionaire aristocrats, are the Old World. The telcos are merely trying to become the tax collectors of the publishers.

    Well I say: No taxation without representation. Let?s submit all the telcos? plans to the full light of detailed analysis. I say: True freedom comes from the right to speak, and the right of assembly ? the right to listen, the right to be heard. Taxing access to push, or to pull, information - whether directly through charges, or indirectly through quality of service prejudice and aristocratic concession, is anti-democratic, anti-free speech and, anti-freedom.

    Give me liberty, or give me death.
    Stephen Wheeler