MySpace, MTV cast lot with Auditude: Who will follow?

MySpace, MTV cast lot with Auditude: Who will follow?

Summary: MySpace and MTV have teamed with Auditude, an online advertising technology startup, to insert ads in pirated content. The goal: Allow content owners to profit from clips uploaded and distributed without permission.

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MySpace and MTV have teamed with Auditude, an online advertising technology startup, to insert ads in pirated content. The goal: Allow content owners to profit from clips uploaded and distributed without permission.

While the deal (statement) has raised quite a ruckus on Techmeme and most of the reaction is extremely positive. But folks should take a step back.

Why? There are a lot of unknowns here. The biggest unknown: Will other content owners use Auditude? MySpace and MTV are using Auditude technology to automatically identify professional video and insert ads. Content owners will also be able to add overlays and plugs to shows, content and commerce opportunities.

Sounds great, but the missing ingredient in this deal is the ad revenue split. What exactly will content owners get? Half of the revenue? Seventy percent? What does MTV get?

Those details, which are critical for Auditude's technology to be the real deal, are unknown at the moment. Unless content owners get a good revenue split this deal may not be all it's cracked up to be.

Topic: Social Enterprise

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3 comments
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  • Troubling...

    While it somewhat promising to perhaps keep websites free from big media suits against them for user's upload content, it troubles me. Not the fact that MySpace and MTV are using it, but who else will use it in the future? AT&T was in the process of trying to block possible pirated content by fingerprinting audio and video content. Not sure if they are still thinking about that. To me though, it's troublesome.
    What happens if more and more companies are allowed to monitor your activities on the net and modify and disrupt your data? It's no big deal if a company uses such technology on their own website to deal with uploaded content that could possibly copyright infringing, but where will it go? Media companies are already suing site owners for user uploaded content, forcing them to adopt such technologies as these. Where will it go? If media companies are allowed to continue to violate people's rights in an attempt to protect and grow their money piles there's only one place I can see this going, and you won't see any clouds or harps.
    Well not clouds in the traditional sense. If this combines with the "cloud" dream of certain companies, it could possibly be utterly frightening. Suppose that it gets to the point that all of your data is backed up and only a portion is cached on a local hard drive. Now suppose you are about to go on a long flight to Asia for a business trip. Your netbook doesn't have an optical drive, but you want to watch that movie you just bought on your flight over, and maybe another on your way back. So you convert it and put it on the hard drive of your laptop, and pack for your trip. When you get back though, you find a bill in your mailbox, for the price of a digital copy of the movie you actually own on DVD. You call and complain, saying you own the movie. They don't care. You refuse to pay. It goes on your credit statement.
    I don't think such a situation is that far off unless privacy rights are enforced as technology increases and media's fears go with it.
    geekyone
  • What's this sentence mean?

    "While the deal (statement) has raised quite a ruckus on Techmeme and most of the reaction is extremely positive."

    This appears to be either an incomplete sentence or otherwise isn't structured correctly. Not trying to be coy here, but would like to understand what you meant to say. Should the 'and' be replaced with a comma?
    ejhonda
  • Possibly a short-lived phenomenon

    Companies like Youtube and Myspace may learn quickly that they do not have any super-powers; if they hack off users there will be competitors who pick up slack overnight. They will operate in regions not so friendly to the media cartel's goon squads. It's not that expensive to build up the server infrastructure using today's cheap parts: a 50TB storage array is going for about $20K these days, and a rack of high-power blades for another $20K that could service a large community of users.
    terry flores