MySQL tries disruptive pricing to attract customers

MySQL tries disruptive pricing to attract customers

Summary: While Oracle and Sun are going after Red Hat Linux with lower pricing models for support and service, MySQL is making pricing a move to attract customers to its open source database.  The company announced MySQL Enterprise Unlimited, claiming that customers who have Oracle, SQL Server, Sybase or DB2  Enterprise License Agreements (ELAs) can save over $1 million.

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TOPICS: Tech Industry
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While Oracle and Sun are going after Red Hat Linux with lower pricing models for support and service, MySQL is making pricing a move to attract customers to its open source database.  The company announced MySQL Enterprise Unlimited, claiming that customers who have Oracle, SQL Server, Sybase or DB2  Enterprise License Agreements (ELAs) can save over $1 million.

For the fixed price of a single Oracle CPU license (about $40,000) per year, customers can deploy MySQL Enterprise Gold--which is $2,995 per server per year--across their entire organization. The fee includes monitoring and advisory services, all you can consume 24x7 problem resolution support, 100 hours of consultative support, 20 support contacts and monthly updates and quarterly service packs.  Gold service doesn't include services such as performance tuning, schema reviews or code reviews of client APIs, user-defined functions, server extensions or stored procedures, triggers and functions.   

While the Unlimited service will attract attention of the thousand of customers spending big bucks with the big four database companies, it will probably do more in the short term to attract MySQL enterprise database customers who download the software but don't pay MySQL a cent for service and support. Good move, especially if Oracle begins to offer support for MySQL as it has done for Red Hat.                           

Topic: Tech Industry

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3 comments
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  • throwing bait

    throw bait hoping the fish would bite.


    Once the customer has most of code and entire enterprise operations running, MySQL can conveniently change terms on them. Now it would be more like, would the enterprise shop switch or take the time/effort to switch
    zzz1234567890
    • correction

      Now it would be more like, would the enterprise shop continue as is or take the time/effort to switch
      zzz1234567890
    • They could do that, sure.

      But the fact that MySQL is a free/libre platform discourages such practices. MySQL (the company) has to make sure they have the best value/dollar ratio, or else another consulting firm can underbid them. knowing they have the same rights to the MySQL code as MySQL (the company) has.

      Now the fact that the code came from MySQL (the company) gives them an edge on the value side of the equation, but that only goes so far. In the end MySQL (the company) still has to offer a competitive servive contract, not just now, but always.
      Michael Kelly