NetSuite 11 targeting mid-market with verticals

NetSuite 11 targeting mid-market with verticals

Summary: With an possible IPO in the works for this year, NetSuite CEO Zach Nelson and team are priming the pump with a new version of NetSuite and verticals for the mid-market. Version 11.

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With an possible IPO in the works for this year, NetSuite CEO Zach Nelson and team are priming the pump with a new version of NetSuite and verticals for the mid-market. Version 11.0 includes AJAX pixie dust for the user interface, a scripting langugage for business process customization, and improved reporting, scheduling, graphing and document management. The new verticals NetSuite Wholesale/Distribution Edition and NetSuite Services Company Edition. 

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SuiteScript, which is built on JavaScript and part of NetSuite's Netflex customization platform, and its APIs can be used to create business processes with branching logic and time-based decision trees. User events, such changes to existing records and more complex processes, can be triggered or scheduled.

Like larger vendors going after the mid-market, which have similar needs to larger companies, NetSuite provides an all-in-one, integrated business suite--ERP, CRM, eCommerce-- to manage core business processes. SAP, for example, intends to focus on the mid-market from the top down with more of an on- premises focus, while NetSuite is a comparatively tiny player coming from the bottom up with pure on-demand solutions. It's a huge market, with application companies like Microsoft, Oracle and Sage also on the ground. Over the next few years, the fight for the mid-market with integrated, service-enabled, all-in-one solutions will be interesting to watch...

Topic: Enterprise Software

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  • Netsuite - money pit with management appeal

    I worked for a company that sunk THOUSANDS into Netsuite only to find it was not flexible enought o accomodate their business needs and would have completely forced a change in the business model of that company. Over $50K later, they gave up on Netsuite (and they had to sign a agreement saying they would not speak negatively about Netsuite to back out of the contract).

    I have yet to meet anyone that has been a Netsuite success story. They have all suffered losses using Netsuite; be it in performance of the system (slow), Netsuite not even being reachable (now that's a good way to start your business day), or it not fitting their business needs and being told it cannot be modified to meet their needs.

    The only thing Netsuite succeeded in delivering was unfulfilled promises from salesmen saying they could accomodate the business' specific needs.

    I understand there is the appeal of outsourcing IT that has some management appeal, but your main ERP/CRM is WAY TOO IMPORTANT to rely on services like Netsuite.
    BlueCollarGeek