Nokia's Lumia Windows Phone moment of truth: Will consumers 'have to have them?'

Nokia's Lumia Windows Phone moment of truth: Will consumers 'have to have them?'

Summary: The stakes are high for Nokia and this Lumia launch and its fate rests with that 25-year-old global citizen who has to decide whether she wants a world filled with Windows Phone tiles

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Nokia CEO Stephen Elop launched the company's Lumia devices---designed to put the smartphone maker back on track---and said "there is still some adventure ahead of us." He's not kidding. How this adventure plays out will largely depend on a 25-year-old consumer that Nokia hopes will be filled with gadget lust.

Nokia's fate depends on your emotional attachment to this device.

Indeed, Nokia's launch is just the beginning and it's unclear if the company's plan to "fill the world with tiles" will pay off. Structurally, Nokia hit its key themes.

  • The Lumia 700 and 800 will hit the market in November.
  • The devices will roll out in a global blitzkrieg that starts in France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain and the UK in November, fans out to Hong Kong, India, Russia, Singapore and Taiwan by the end of the year and then lands in the U.S. in early 2012. Lumia devices will support WCDMA, HSPA and LTE and CDMA in "specific local markets" likely to be the U.S.
  • Carrier and retail support will be huge.

Add it up and Nokia proved it could move quickly, partner well with Microsoft to get a product out the door and launch devices designed to stem a market share slide. Welcome to the starting line Nokia.

Elop in his keynote at Nokia World in London admitted the fun is just beginning (live blog, Nokia statement, Techmeme). "Today is just the beginning of our new adventure," said Elop. "We will upgrade an ordinary moment into an exciting one."

Also: Nokia's first Windows Phones: What's there, what's not | CNET: Nokia debuts Lumia 800, 710, first Windows Phone handsets | Nokia is back in the smartphone game...sort of

The highlight of the keynote really came from Steven Overman, vice president of marketing creation for Nokia. He outlined how Nokia will target 25 year olds who don't remember a time when information wasn't at their fingertips. Overman's breathless soundbites go like this:

  • "The amazing every day."
  • "Luscious."
  • "Butter smooth UI."
  • "We'll fill the world with tiles"
  • "Amazing moments."

Credit: Stephen Shankland, CNET News

Credit: Stephen Shankland, CNET News

According to Overman, this marketing nirvana will "be a journey to the moment of truth" when the consumer will get to a store experience and "point of sale furniture" that will close the Nokia Lumia deal. "At that moment of truth decisions are emotional," gushed Overman.

Overman's part of the keynote was a bit much for breakfast---at least on East Coast time in the U.S.---but that point-of-sale experience will make or break Nokia's Windows Phone plans. The devices look sharp, but Nokia's Lumia phones won't be the cool kids on the block. That space is occupied by Apple's iPhone. Meanwhile Android has its own distribution army that can match Nokia's now.

In the end, Nokia's fate rests with that target demographic. That smartphone buyer will have to be filled with gadget lust, drool over the Lumia and perhaps overcome the fact that Nokia has had a rough few years leading up to this moment. I see potential for gadget lust, but curiosity about the Lumia doesn't get me to the point where I'm handing over my credit card.

My next big question for Nokia's Lumia: Will I wait for it when my contract is up in December? I need to see more, but my personal calculus merely highlight the hurdles ahead of Nokia and its Lumia phones. Nokia needs a hit.

Morgan Stanley analysts said in a research note:

"While Nokia is optimistic about its new OS strategy, there is no certainty that it can launch compelling new Windows Phone devices in 12 months. The longer it takes to launch a successful device, the harder it will be to create the necessary ecosystem."

Simply put, the stakes are high for Nokia and this Lumia launch and its fate rests with that 25-year-old global citizen who has to decide whether she wants a world filled with Windows Phone tiles.

Topics: Mobility, Hardware, Nokia, Operating Systems, Smartphones, Software, Telcos, Windows

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39 comments
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  • Just seen it.

    I don't want it..<br><br>I saw the "sony ericsson experia arc s" and wanted it. The motorola Atrix made me dream of owning one..<br><br>These nokia phones evoke absolutely no emotion and the windows phone app is just as bland.
    arnold123
    • RE: Nokia's Lumia Windows Phone moment of truth: Will consumers 'have to have them?'

      @arnold123

      If Mr Arnold123 doen't like it, then it must be a winner!
      Blogsworth
      • RE: Nokia's Lumia Windows Phone moment of truth: Will consumers 'have to have them?'

        @Blogsworth

        Nokia unveiled the FAILPHONE 800. Goodby Nokia, goodby Windows FAIL Phone 7.x .....
        Watchmen247
    • RE: Nokia's Lumia Windows Phone moment of truth: Will consumers 'have to have them?'

      i want it..<br><br>I saw the "sony ericsson experia arc s" and don't want it. The motorola Atrix made me have nightmares...<br><br>These nokia phones evoke emotions and the windows phone apps are just as exciting.
      ozinanoypi
  • RE: Nokia's Lumia Windows Phone moment of truth: Will consumers 'have to have them?'

    The look boring! They can never compete with iPhone & galaxy. They are far a head in race.
    frhamid
    • Master Joe Says...Exactly

      @frhamid Why would you want something that is extremely functional, easy to use, simple, fast, and soon to be unified with the desktop OS, when you could have a Marketplace riddled with malware, or a locked down experience which has 10 buyers because fo brand for every 1 buyer who bought it because it was actually the best fit for them? I totally see your point. Good job.

      --Master Joe
      SteelCityPC
      • RE: Nokia's Lumia Windows Phone moment of truth: Will consumers 'have to have them?'

        @MasterJoe You do know that the Windows Phone marketplace and Windows Phone ecosystem is just as "locked down" as iOS right? And it's simply a matter of time before the vulnerabilites are exploited in WP7... just because they have not been yet does not mean they do not exist and cannot be found. Also there is the whole "Big Brother Microsoft" is watching... which is what tuned me off of the WP7 platform.

        You were saying?
        athynz
      • RE: Nokia's Lumia Windows Phone moment of truth: Will consumers 'have to have them?'

        @Pete "athynz" Athens [i]just because they have not been yet does not mean they do not exist and cannot be found. Also there is the whole "Big Brother Microsoft" is watching... which is what tuned me off of the WP7 platform.[/i]

        I'm sorry, were you talking about Apple or MS in that little rant... I get so confused since they're about the same.
        Badgered
      • RE: Nokia's Lumia Windows Phone moment of truth: Will consumers 'have to have them?'

        @Badgered

        [b]I'm sorry, were you talking about Apple or MS in that little rant... I get so confused since they're about the same.[/b]

        I was referring to WP7 but it could apply to iOS as well as there is NO perfect OS out there.
        athynz
    • RE: Nokia's Lumia Windows Phone moment of truth: Will consumers 'have to have them?'

      @frhamid iPhone = static row of icons. How is that less boring than live tiles?

      Seems to be the new party piece coming from ABMers these days.
      jhughesy
      • RE: Nokia's Lumia Windows Phone moment of truth: Will consumers 'have to have them?'

        @jhughesy [q]@frhamid iPhone = static row of icons. How is that less boring than live tiles?

        Seems to be the new party piece coming from ABMers these days.[/q]

        You do mean that is the standard B.S. line coming from the NBMers? Large bland Icons are in fact more boring than Icons that readily Identify the App. When the Icons all look the same, you are forced to read the text, which makes getting access to said app slower.
        Rick_Kl
  • Cool?

    iPhone was school cool a couple years back..
    Now it's Android ( talking SoCal).
    Nokia if it has a slick design and cool colors could be the next "cool" phone device...
    rhonin
  • For the non-techy

    It's going to get lost in a sea of not-iPhones.

    Honestly, someone who doesn't read tech articles will have heard of the iPhone, and maybe Android. Where's the compelling story that will make them walk past those to get to this?
    gtvr
    • Master Joe Says...Marketing

      @gtvr That's what marketing is for. It is up to Nokia (and Microsoft) to get the word out about this phone, and Windows Phone in general. If it weren't for marketing, neither iPhone nor Android would have the kind of recognition that they have, just like any other popular product that comes out. If there were no Zoo-zoo pets commercials a couple of years ago, it wouldn't have been the #1 Christmas list item. This is no different.

      --Master Joe
      SteelCityPC
      • RE: Nokia's Lumia Windows Phone moment of truth: Will consumers 'have to have them?'

        @MasterJoe Only one little flaw in your theory. Microsoft has spent more in advertising on Windows mobile phones than Apple spent on advertising period. Just because the ads were not effective, does not mean the ads were not run.
        Rick_Kl
    • RE: Nokia's Lumia Windows Phone moment of truth: Will consumers 'have to have them?'

      @gtvr It look sexy, thats what!
      jhughesy
  • cheap sell...

    http://www.sipostyle.com
    sdhi
  • dfrtyewre

    http://www.sipostyle.com
    sdhi
  • Nope, more Windows Phone Junk

    Those are very uninspiring. Combine that with the UI nightmare that is Windows Phone and you have a failure.
    itguy10
    • RE: Nokia's Lumia Windows Phone moment of truth: Will consumers 'have to have them?'

      @itguy10 [i]Combine that with the UI nightmare that is Windows Phone and you have a failure.[/i]

      You've tried WP7 then? Because from the few people I know who actually tried it... they bought them, and are very pleased they did. Granted, not many people I know walked past the iPhone to try anything else.
      Badgered