Pop-up program fetches banking data

Pop-up program fetches banking data

Summary: Alert: A Trojan horse that installs itself through a pop-up ad can read keystrokes and steal passwords when victims visit any of nearly 50 targeted banking sites--including Citibank, Barclays Bank and Deutsche Bank--security researchers warned yesterday.

SHARE:
TOPICS: Banking
1

Alert: A Trojan horse that installs itself through a pop-up ad can read keystrokes and steal passwords when victims visit any of nearly 50 targeted banking sites--including Citibank, Barclays Bank and Deutsche Bank--security researchers warned yesterday.

Topic: Banking

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

1 comment
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • Marketing is Different

    Steve,

    An interesting take. I may have been a little hard on Marc - in my response to Dan's original Blog - but I stand by my original comments; Marc Benioff (of Salesforce) needs to work harder on his Marketing (as opposed to Sales) message. He certainly shouldn't have to rely on people such as yourself - though you do a good job - to sell himself, and market his company.

    As you so rightly point out: "Marc is a sales maestro, and living by that sword means you risk dying by it". The CEO of any good company will be it's premier sales representative. No sale today = no company tomorrow. But aside from that guarantee - poor marketing today means a smaller company tomorrow (also guaranteed), and might even mean no company tomorrow too. This is a subtle, but vital, distinction that many good C-level managers fail to grasp.

    A great CEO should also have vision, and I have no doubt that your memories of Marc in this regard are accurate. They need three other attributes: an ability to see the detail under summaries (a technical skill, particularly with numbers, that few intelligent people will have difficulty learning), and an ability to strategise and to lead.

    Of these, an ability to strategise is never certain. Anyone, given the opportunity, might get lucky so past success is no guide. Marketing is about those last two CEO attributes. It is not enough that a CEO is a leader in the sense that he or she is willing to stand up and be counted, to take the risks that others prevaricate over. Great market leadership is about listening, and reflecting back the needs and wants of customers - but in an unexpected way. It is about making them feel comfortable with a new direction - a new, unexplored, road.

    You berate Microsoft for the lack of new direction in their strategy - their new platforms (Longhorn, et al) are too conservative for you. But will it, perhaps, be a 'big enough' change for everyone else? I believe it will for many, given the large changes people have to make in order to embrace more Outsourcing (including buying-in more Salesforce-style services and creating service desks to manage contractors), and a big step up in Web Services (more business process automation).

    My belief is based on the observation that the World does not like revolutions. Disruptive technologies - such as the Skype you cite - are great, but nearly always require someone to add a bridge, a migration path, or evolutionary intermediate steps if you will. Thus; Businesses are rushing to adopt VoIP from service providers that offer guaranteed service levels through network asset allocation and centralized, managed, directories - even though it costs more than Skype.

    Also, your example of how the rest of the industry is moving in the same direction as Marc and Salesforce is unconvincing. It is a very Net-Journalism-centric view. There are many other business applications out there that require a more considered, and better mapped, road ahead.

    Leading a company, which Marc is clearly very skilled at doing in all other respects, is very different to leading a market. It is this aspect of his leadership that I previously questioned - and your article, here, does nothing to convince me that I should change my mind.

    Perhaps you are right Steve, perhaps Marc is blessed (still) with insight. If that is so, it does not come across in his presentation of where Salesforce is going in the longer term. I still contend that Marc is failing to set his customers' hearts racing with his vision: His marketing fails to put across a convincing future in which Salesforce is a major player in the superset of the Net Operating System.

    I would be extremely surprised to find any modern CIO, or Information Office-VP, who does not appreciate the value of Web Services, middleware, XML, and the benefits of a single (browser) user interface. That is not the issue at hand, and that may be one reason why Salesforce is having to re-present SForce 6 and Multiforce "again" (to quote Dan Farber). Nor is the idea that the ultimate goal of Web Services and XML more 'software-as-services-on-demand' and outsourcing especially demanding - and this may be why those who have heard what Salesforce have to say now walk out of their presentations (see second Talkback to Dan Farber's original article on ZDNet).

    I said this in a more roundabout way last time - but now I see that Salesforce's problem is bigger than I first imagined: If Marc wants to learn how to market his company I can help him. Give him my number.
    Stephen Wheeler