Qualcomm floats 'PC alternative' 3G device

Qualcomm floats 'PC alternative' 3G device

Summary: Qualcomm on Wednesday entered the Internet device market with a "PC alternative" designed to give netbooks some competition in emerging markets.The device, dubbed Kayak, is designed to use 3G wireless connectivity and be completely free of landlines and other accessories to connect to the Internet.

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Qualcomm on Wednesday entered the Internet device market with a "PC alternative" designed to give netbooks some competition in emerging markets.

The device, dubbed Kayak, is designed to use 3G wireless connectivity and be completely free of landlines and other accessories to connect to the Internet.

The details--notably a few mockups of this contraption--are sketchy (statement). Qualcomm says it will give device manufacturers a reference design and software specification. The Kayak uses Qualcomm's chipsets for computing and connectivity.

In many respects, Qualcomm is following the Intel playbook. Intel launched the concept of the netbook to sell Atom chips. Qualcomm Kayak is a similar play, but focused on the company's wireless core strengths. If successful, Kayak can gain more share for Qualcomm's Snapdragon chipsets and platform.

Among the Kayak specs:

  • A Web browser from Opera;
  • Support for TVs and computer monitors to access larger screens;
  • Keyboard and mouse compatibility.

Qualcomm added that Inventec will start user trials for Kayak in the first quarter in Southeast Asia. Qualcomm told the Wall Street Journal that the devices will cost less than $399.

Topics: Mobility, Hardware, Networking, Processors, Wi-Fi

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3 comments
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  • You left tou the most importand thing: what operating system will it use?

    We can rule out Vista, Win7, XP, as it is not x86.
    DonnieBoy
    • Hardly "most important"

      At this point the main thing that matters to "real people" (i.e. the 95% of the world who aren't geeks) is how well it can browse the web. With web access you get your e-mail, and you can use Google Docs for MS Office compatibility.

      It's not like you're going to be buying the thing to run hard-core dedicated software, or really any other software you already own. So the O/S becomes largely irrelevant to the majority of consumers of a device like this.

      The "Network Computer" concept is finally coming into its own.
      Lun_Esex
  • RE: Qualcomm floats 'PC alternative' 3G device

    The device I'd like to buy is an unblocked iPhone with Skype.
    dtokeefe9