Ray Ozzie proposes universal Web clipboard

Ray Ozzie proposes universal Web clipboard

Summary: At O'Reilly Emerging Technology Conference, Microsoft CTO Ray Ozzie demoed a way to bring the clipboard concept from the PC to the world of the Web. The Web clipboard is implemented as a clipboard on the clipboard, taking the text format of the clipboard and putting in more structured data, XML schemas.

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TOPICS: Browser
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ray200.jpgAt O'Reilly Emerging Technology Conference, Microsoft CTO Ray Ozzie demoed a way to bring the clipboard concept from the PC to the world of the Web. The Web clipboard is implemented as a clipboard on the clipboard, taking the text format of the clipboard and putting in more structured data, XML schemas. He demoed prototype concepts such copying event data into a Web calendar or Outlook and taking profile information from one Web site and placing it in another. He took the concept even further--updating what is cut and pasted via dynamically linked RSS feeds.

Ozzie concluded: "The bottom line is this--I believe there is power in simplicity. The Web has emerged because it is a useful collection of hacks. Hacks get layered on hacks...if we as a community can extend the clipboard to Web we can do so. Microsoft itself can't do it...and it will only be useful if many people do," Ozzie said. Microsoft will instrument its applications and Web services, Ozzie said, and will work with the outside world to standardize data format and other parts that would be need for a Web clipboard to be universal.

clipboard.jpg

 

 

 

He supplies more detail in a blog post:

I call this new concept Live Clipboard...

The goal is to create a standard that works across many different scenarios, many different types of websites, and many different PC-based applications.  In the same vein as Simple Sharing Extensions, we’re releasing our work under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license.

Note: Ozzie demoed the Live Clipboard using FireFox...

Topic: Browser

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7 comments
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  • And security is provided by....?

    As soon as we see the detailed explanations surrounding how all of the functions are secured, THEN we should pay attention. Until then, tell them to take it back to the kitchen and keep baking it.
    ejhonda
    • Not the place for security

      This isn't the layer for security. Your OS / desktop et. al. are responsible for security. Technically, since you're only slinging XML, you shouldn't have to worry about vulnerabilities, at least in operating systems where security is designed in from the ground up, not bolted on the side as an afterthought.
      Sxooter_z
      • Ahh...Microsoft and Security...

        In 1992, the IETF Network Working Group (Nat Borenstein, et. al.) first published the MIME Standards for encoding and decoding non-textual data (images, applications, spreadsheets, Word documents, etc.) in email messages. These standards have been updated twice, once in 1993 and again in 1996.

        Time and again throughout these documents, the authors caution that:

        "Implementors should pay special attention
        to the security implications of any mail
        content-types that can cause the remote
        execution of any actions in the recipient's
        environment."

        Language such as:

        "Authors of mail-reading agents are cautioned
        against giving their systems the power to
        execute mail-based application data without
        carefully considering the security
        implications"

        is peppered throughout some four years of Internet standards.

        When Microsoft chose to ignore these experts on IP networking and release email programs that blithely executed MIME attachments without concern for critical security issues, it proved itself incapable of acting in the best interests of its customers.

        Fourteen years later, Microsoft is still paying for this arrogance.

        We should not trust Microsoft, ever.
        raisch
        • Who's paying

          quote:: Fourteen years later, Microsoft is still paying for this arrogance. ::quote

          It is not Microsoft who are paying, it is their customers.

          We should not trust Microsoft, ever!
          tracy anne
  • Ozzie on the Value of Open Standards?

    Quit it! Please! Stop!

    *wiping away tears* I'm laughing so hard my sides hurt.

    After reading Ozzie's blog, I'm struck by the wonderful absurdity of his very first statement:

    "For years, many companies <i>including Microsoft</i> have invested significantly in the open, interoperable use of XML and Web Services toward enabling programmatic interconnection between processes, services and sites across the internet."

    Like Outlook? Like Word or Excel?

    All closed, no interoperability here.

    Like HTML? CSS or Java?

    All "improved" beyond what their standard describes.

    The list goes on and on.

    I think that's a pretty arrogant statement from a company hell-bent on owning every document format and "interoperable" standard.

    Perhaps they use special Microsoft-blessed copies of Word that automatically adjust all instances of "interoperable" to the more acceptable spelling: <b>inoperable</b>.
    raisch
    • standards

      Could he be talking about their implementation of XML within the .NET framework? Have you worked with this? It's too cool. the best programming environment I've ever used.
      April May
  • Microsoft already thought of this...

    After all, IE has been sharing your clipboard with the rest of the web for years :)
    DaveHowe_z