Smart move: iPhone opens up to Web developers

Smart move: iPhone opens up to Web developers

Summary: Apple is bringing its Safari browser to Windows (see Larry's review of the beta). It's a logical extension of Apple's embrace and extend Windows, which began with iTunes.

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Apple is bringing its Safari browser to Windows (see Larry's review of the beta). It's a logical extension of Apple's embrace and extend Windows, which began with iTunes. It's not likely that Safari for Windows will make a dent in Firefox or Internet Explorer, but it will be a boon for the iPhone as a platform.

iphonedev.jpg Watch the video clip from Steve Jobs' WWDC presentation on the iPhone and developers

The iPhone, due to launch June 29, will support applications created with Web 2.0 standards, such as AJAX and REST. The iPhone is built on Apple's OS X and includes the Safari browser. Applications developers can create plug-ins or widgets, for example, that work with Mac and Windows Safari and the iPhone, with the capability to tap into iPhone’s services for initiating phone calls, sending email and mashing up with Google Maps.

However, Apple is not opening up the iPhone to native applications, outside of the browser, and allowing deep integration. Nonetheless, it's a friction-free and secure way to get tens of thousands of developers working in an iPhone ecosystem. Smart move.

Topics: Browser, iPhone, Mobility, Windows

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3 comments
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  • I say call the bluff

    If they had wanted to open up to developers, there would be an SDK.

    The mere fact that a version of Safari that includes Javascript is on the phone means that they had to support Web 2.0. So they're doing nothing more than stating the obvious when they say the iPhone will support applications through this model. It just doesn't compare.

    If there was a developer kit, you can bet that the #1 consumer request : GPS integration, would be fulfilled through the addition of a bluetooth GPS module and accompanying software. This will be impossible with Apple's recommended model.
    Julien Collot
    • And the worst part

      These stupid non-applications won't even be available when you're offline !

      Which means :
      - you need a data plan
      - the limitations are not the hardware, and great technologies that you can find in the phone, but the functionality of the web browser (which won't play flash, limiting the possibilities even more - confirmed after the keynote)

      I've been waiting for this phone. I'm just think I might have to wait for v2
      Julien Collot
  • Weak, weak, weak

    Hey if just developing web applications to be used through Safari is good enough for the iPhone, shouldn't that same philosophy apply to the Mac in general? Funny, I don't see Steve telling developers to stop making Mac apps and instead just make web apps.
    tic swayback