The future of Blu-Ray? Watch porn

The future of Blu-Ray? Watch porn

Summary: On the heels of the annual Consumer Electronics Show, the New York Times had a good read this morning about the fuzzy future of Blu-Ray. It kind of made me chuckle because The Times, much like most mainstream news outlets, didn't touch the one element of this story that really shouldn't be ignored.

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TOPICS: Hardware, Mobility
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On the heels of the annual Consumer Electronics Show, the New York Times had a good read this morning about the fuzzy future of Blu-Ray. It kind of made me chuckle because The Times, much like most mainstream news outlets, didn't touch the one element of this story that really shouldn't be ignored.

Porn.

As you may know, the Adult Entertainment Expo kicks off in Vegas while the CES crowd is still around. That's no coincidence. Think for one moment about the link between cutting-edge video technology and the adult industry. Going back to the days of reel-to-reel stag films in my grandfather's day, adult films have long been at the forefront of the next video technology. A couple of years ago, when the battle between Blu-Ray and HD-DVD was still heating up, I asked one of the show's organizers about the direction that his industry might take and was kind of surprised by the answer.

Aside from the chuckles we had about the crisp, clear quality of a high-def picture and the physical flaws of some of the on-screen talent, this guy said that the industry itself would probably put out some titles in Blu-Ray or HD-DVD but that he wouldn't be surprised to see the adult industry skip the HD war altogether and focus more on the next wave - video that could streamed or downloaded directly to a PC or TV. Fast-forward to today and that's basically what The Times story is saying about the mainstream:

Blu-ray’s backers, including Sony and the Walt Disney Company, face a growing chorus of skeptics that says the window for a high-definition disc format may be closing fast. One reason is that discs of all kinds may become obsolete as a new wave of digital media services starts to flow into the living room. On Monday, for example, the Korean television maker LG Electronics plans to announce a new line of high-definition televisions that connect directly to the Internet with no set-top box required. The televisions will be able to play movies and television shows from online video-on-demand services, including Netflix.

“The Blu-ray format is in jeopardy simply because the advent of downloadable HD movies is so close,” said Roger L. Kay, president of Endpoint Technologies Associates. a research and consulting company. “Streaming video from the Internet and other means of direct digital delivery are going to put optical formats out of business entirely over the next few years.”

Thanks to sites like YouTube, the concept of watching a streaming video over the Internet has already hit the mainstream. That, in turn, has sparked some adult-oriented copycats (except with revenue models.) Now, just as the idea of delivering Web-based video content directly to the living room TV starts to grow in the mainstream, so does the presence of the adult industry in those same business models.Vudu AVN Vudu, which leads the industry in offering HD titles via its service, also has a discreet AVN (Adult Video Network) channel. The company says it has hundreds of titles from leading adult studios available and, for some titles, a high-def offering. It has also built-in discreet billing, password-protected privacy controls and competitive pricing to rent or own.

Getting back to the point, it seems that, once again, the adult industry is at the forefront of cutting-edge video technology and sets the stage for what's ahead in 2009 in the mainstream. Oh sure, Blu-Ray backers will continue to advocate for their technology at CES this week. But, a stone's throw-away at the other convention, folks there have already moved on to the next phase. The mainstream would be wise to do the same.

Topics: Hardware, Mobility

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  • The future of Blu-Ray? Watch porn

    Don't forget to factor in the higher cost of blue-ray or at the time hd-dvd. We can find free porn on the internet, no need to pay the $25 for an HD dvd. Some of the adult stores sell regular dvds for $5 or so (you know, from what I heard of course), and the visual differences between blue-ray and regular dvd aren't all that great especially to someone who does not have the hdtv to watch it. I don't blame the porn industry one bit for wanting to stream porn. It makes it a lot easier for me... err.. I mean people to watch.
    Loverock Davidson
    • you are right

      The only thing that hinders IPTv and downloads on the Tv is the lack of the a network jack close to the TV.
      Wireless might not cut it unless it is very close when streaming.
      Linux Geek
      • Powerline adapters solve the wireless issue

        Simple way to resolve the networking to to bundle a pair of Powerline adapters in with whatever you are selling.

        In the UK BT give a pair away with their Microsoft Mediaroom based hybrid IPTV/Digital Terestrial BT Vision box - As long as you have an aerial point (by your TV !), you can show it anywhere in the house. Simple and effective.

        Of course the enlightened amongst us have Gigabit wired ethernet through the house :-)
        neil.postlethwaite
    • um... 10

      And we thank you for your support and patronage.
      B.O.F.H.
    • The future of Blu-Ray? Watch porn

      I er... um... heard those same rumors. Just in the interest of being well-informed, of course. :p
      neverhome
    • Whoa LD! Now this IS kinda scary...

      Linux Geek and most everyone actually AGREEING with you...

      Hang on, checking the weather report in Hades - yup... There's a massive cold front heading that way...! They seem to be forecasting frost warnings even.

      That said, you're right. Even if you do have an HDTV, I think most viewers won't be wanting to play connect the dots with the zits on some starlet's backside. They're likely to be busy doing something else...
      Wolfie2K3
  • RE: The future of Blu-Ray? Watch porn

    what about the people who's fastest available internet connection is 56k? Don't think that is only rural areas... i have a co-worker who doesn't live that far out of town and can only get dialup!
    bjs_z
    • Only Dial-up

      High speed internet (relative) has been available for
      quite awhile thru DirecTv by way of satellite which is
      available anywhere you can see the southern sky. (in
      the US).
      jsanko
  • RE: The future of Blu-Ray? Watch porn

    How can this be on the heels of the Consumer
    Electronics Show if it doesn't even start until
    Wednesday?
    jsanko
  • Any CD would have a BIOS

    This BIOS makes it possible for the CD to work.There would be pages in this BIOS for adjustments,clicking stuff in,sizes,speeds and so on.
    BALTHOR
  • Probably true

    Probably true. DVD's already provide pretty good quality for most users. A problem with downloads is you can't give them as gifts and you can't use them "wherever whenever", e.g., for kids in the car, on a camping trip, in a vacation cabin, a Winnebago, an airport lounge, Starbucks, etc. Also, hi-def really isn't that impressive on a small screen. Music CD's are still around and will be for years, despite MP3's.

    Realistically, the Blu-Ray format itself will really take off when re-writable disks/drives hit about 200 GB capacity at a decent price, so they can be used for large-scale backup. Tape drives in that range are astronomical.
    Rick_R
    • Where there's a will, there's a way...

      [b]Probably true. DVD's already provide pretty good quality for most users. A problem with downloads is you can't give them as gifts and you can't use them "wherever whenever", e.g., for kids in the car, on a camping trip, in a vacation cabin, a Winnebago, an airport lounge, Starbucks, etc. Also, hi-def really isn't that impressive on a small screen. Music CD's are still around and will be for years, despite MP3's. [/b]

      While you can't always give the actual files you've downloaded as a gift, with the music biz, you CAN give gift cards that give you so much credit towards downloads on iTunes or other music services that do per song pricing. You can likely also give gift subscriptions to subscription services like Zune Marketplace as well.

      I would imagine video services would likely do something similar.

      Of course, we ARE talking about freakin' PORN here - so somehow I don't think playing the spankables in public places is something that most people would be wanting to do. Most would be happy with streaming them at home or somewhere they can have some private uh..time.

      [b]Realistically, the Blu-Ray format itself will really take off when re-writable disks/drives hit about 200 GB capacity at a decent price, so they can be used for large-scale backup. Tape drives in that range are astronomical. [/b]

      Eh.. Maybe, more than likely not. Burning DVD and BR media takes a lot longer than copying the drive to another hard drive of greater or equal capacity. Standard hard drives are dirt cheap - and you can buy an external cage to house them for less than $20 bucks. Or you can buy an external drive complete for a bit more. Those generally even come with backup software. And with USB 3.0 on the horizon, their future is almost certainly guaranteed.
      Wolfie2K3
  • RE: The future of Blu-Ray? Watch porn

    The next players will use the memory cards.
    With memory and SSD (solid state drives) getting larger and cheaper the next step is to put movies on a chip. No more mechanical DVD's.
    A player/reader will be needed for now but soon TVs will have them built in.
    MoeFugger
    • BINGO!!! Give this guy a huge cigar!!

      A lot more can be done in a chip to enhance copyright protection so the fact that the media and software producers haven't pushed in that direction yet is almost shocking. Its long been the ongoing theory that the sheer bulk CD and DVD disks are purchased in by the big producing companies makes the media the data is delivered on dirt cheap, putting the data onto the media with disks is a pretty damn cheap process in itself. To the producers, recordable optical disks are like crack, its such a perfectly profitable "high" they cant give it up. Chips will require a significantly more costly manufacturing process, so much so it will rob profit from the per unit cost.

      But, as the media and software producers are so fanatically worried that illegal downloading is robbing them blind one might expect they would take the plunge and push as hard as a cross continent freight train to get the PC hardware manufacturers to assist in production of components that would make the chips work; DRM included.

      But they haven't. There has also been some considerable discussion of why that might be. Most common opinion at this point is that as mentioned before the cheap cheap cost of recordable disks bought in massive bulk is just so incredibly alluring that the best solution profit wise would be if the current optical disk media could be somehow made DRM perfect. It cannot of course, it seems almost obvious why not in most respects but media producers have now gone to extraordinarily wicked means to try and make software based DRM work to the point where they almost want to take ownership of your computer if you want to use their product.

      The second most popular theory of why they haven't started the chip based media/DRM delivery system is that they just are not sure enough that lack of sales due to downloading is significant enough to make the extraordinary time money and effort to make a switch to new tech would be worth it. For example; if the reason why not as many CD's sell as 20 years ago is that the music being produced on CD's is that much less appealing and results in less sales as a result of that, then the time money and effort would be wasted, and the significantly increased cost of putting media on a chip would just be profit loss.

      Food for thought for sure.
      Cayble
  • Will Blu-Ray Work With Microsoft's New Touch Interface?

    This could be the answer Microsoft's looking for! Why get a touch interface...To watch porn! The new touchy feely interface will give users a new type of Windows eXperience!
    chessmen
  • Blu-ray & Porn ... not such joy

    Part of the joy of porn is the fantasy of sex with a beautiful almost perfect woman. Unfortunately, Blu-ray brings out every single imperfection, butt pimple, wrinkle, bad tooth, breast enhancement scar, etc.

    That takes away from the fantasy that most men (and women) enjoy. Sure, watching porn in a big screen may fun, but if the (fake) "perfection" factor is gone, they joy may be gone too.

    Most people watch porn to fantasize ... that is why porn and Blu-ray may not do well together.
    wackoae
  • RE: The future of Blu-Ray? Watch porn

    Two points:

    1. While I have Blu-Ray, it is not price competitive with conventional DVD. The huge markup on the inadequate players and the price gouging for the discs is going to kill the format. Wake up America. Porn and children's content are huge huge sellers and neither format needs Blu-Ray to do well.

    2. The next big thing could be content streaming, but the greedy ISPs and the limits of the infrastructure is going to limit this to a footnote in history. Pay per view, pay for each bit, pay until you can no longer afford it.

    Just pop a dvd into an upscaling player :-)
    M.M.Grimes
  • RE: The future of Blu-Ray? Watch porn

    I have a 50" plasma HDTV and standard DVD with an upconverting player look just fine to play my movie rentals porn or otherwise. Take your expensive Bluray and shove it!
    nospam8
  • RE: The future of Blu-Ray? Watch porn

    Hi Everyone,

    makes me "smile" how many times I'm seeing black screen on my TV set(cable) provided by "Virgin"(UK) Do you really want that?
    dainiuspace
  • This story overlooks significant facts about adult vs. mainstream

    I don't know any producers of adult video but I do know the owner of a different type of direct to DVD movie studio and I have heard her commenting on the prohibitively high cost of replicating a Blu-Ray disk. So COST is a significant factor pushing the for-profit adult video producers away from Blu-Ray (another commenter is spot on to point out the extremely low cost of replicating standard DVDs).

    Combine these facts with other adult-specific truths: That adult packaged media sell only a few thousand copies (porn is a 'what's new' kind of business) and with the fact that the for-profit adult industry producers have been FORCED online by their market largely tramping over there ahead of them to get the product for
    free, and you have a clearer picture of why that part of the home entertainment industry may not be gung-go for Blu-Ray: They can't afford it, and packaged media like Blu-Ray and DVD are not where their market is shopping any more due to the ubiquitous availability of free product elsewhere (online).

    The adult industry's ubiquity online is not a further example of for-profit porn leading the way in the adoption of a new technology as in the past, except in a forced [i][u]de facto[/u][/i] sense related to certain specific characteristics of the porn (as opposed to the mainstream video) market. Yes, adult may be at the cutting edge of online streaming/download monetization, but today, unlike in the past, other parts of the home entertainment industry will find that their part of the business differs from porn in much more than content. MARKET UPTAKE DIFFERENCES among various parts of home entertainment are becoming vastly more complex.

    Just because pornography leads the way onto the web and shuns Blu-Ray does not mean the rest of the home entertainment industry is certain to follow. Yet that is what this article implies, and that is what the herd view of this industry is mooing. The home entertainment industry has become - and from now forward will remain -- far more complex than that.
    Scott Shuster