Video: Dunn defends herself and politicians lash out at HP

Video: Dunn defends herself and politicians lash out at HP

Summary: We have video from this morning's hearing in which politicians lash out at HP, and many of the witnesses exercise their Fifth Amendment rights, refusing to answer questions from the Congressional subcommittee. Former Chairwoman Patty Dunn attempts to paint herself as a victim of untrustworthy elements inside and outside the company.

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TOPICS: Hewlett-Packard
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We have video from this morning's hearing in which politicians lash out at HP, and many of the witnesses exercise their Fifth Amendment rights, refusing to answer questions from the Congressional subcommittee. Former Chairwoman Patty Dunn attempts to paint herself as a victim of untrustworthy elements inside and outside the company.

Video: Former Chairwoman Patricia Dunn sorry she trusted others

In her testimony before a congressional subcommittee, Patricia Dunn said she deeplyregretted that so many people were let down by relying on others. In other words, don't blame her. She called upon Congress to enact legislations to help protect themselves from serious breaches of confidentiality through legal means.

 

Video: Dunn testifies about what she knew, when 

Patricia Dunn claims the pretexting didn't "jump out" at her until June of 2006.


Video: HP CEO Mark Hurd is grilled by Rep. Dianna DeGette of Colorado

Hurd says Hewlett-Packard's behavior in the leak investigation was not OK. In hindsight he wouldn't have approved the false email sent to a reporter.


Video: Congressional hearing on Thursday

Rep. Greg Walden outlines the problems he sees in HP spying on journalists and its own board members. There was "no excuse," he concludes.

Video: DeGette: Is this common practice in Corporate America?

Democrat Diana DeGette of Colorado said pretexting and spying on private citizens is not corporate behavior that inspires public trust. She spoke at start of a House hearing on Sept. 28, 2006, into Hewlett-Packard's investigation of its board members and of journalists, including CNET News.com reporters.

Video: Subcommittee chair questions private investigator

Rep. Ed Whitefield (R-Ky.) asked one investigator if he was the man who got records of all phone calls made by CNET News.com reporter Dawn Kawamoto. Then the committee chairman interrupted to show his displeasure. Watch a portion of the subcommittee hearing in Washington. 

Video: IT investigator reveals tactics in congressional hearing

Fred Adler, HP's IT security investigator, testifies on Sept. 28, 2006, that tracing personal e-mail is done at HP and that he himself suggested the method be used on a CNET News.com reporter.

Topic: Hewlett-Packard

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5 comments
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  • The Problem at HP Wasn't Dunn, but the Board

    Pattie Dunn made some mistakes, but her departure masks the problems which remain in the composition of the HP Board. Here is a link to a recent posting I made on this subject:

    http://breakoutperformance.blogspot.com/2006/09/problem-at-hp-wasnt-dunn-but-board.html

    Thanks for a great blog,

    Eric
    ejackson_ca
    • Excellent article Mr Jackson!!

      I liked your wrap up, so decided to re-quote it here, since the sad aspect of this seems to be Tom Perkins" and what comes around, comes around again!

      "On the day it was announced that the board would be reshuffled, Tom Perkins -- who has been a strong voice in the HP boardroom, up until he resigned over the "pretexting" earlier this year -- said: "This too shall pass." Alas, Tom, I fear it will; and, in 5 years, HP's board will not be all that different from how it looks today."
      john_galt@...
  • Business ethics?the ultimate oxymoron

    When people "exercise their Fifth Amendment rights", especially before a Congressional Hearing...you know they are guilty as sin. And those of you out there with ACLU leanings...find another place to voice your opinions.

    Whatever happens in the world of business, the Boards of Directors are responsible. If they feign ignorance on a particular matter, then they are just as culpable as those doing the dirty deeds, & shouldn?t be on the board in the first place. They are the ?Captain of the Ship?, and if the ship goes down, so should the Board.

    But, with the world business climate so wrapped up the bottom line, & protecting their own butts (i.e. ?CYA?), anything that needs to be done will be done?ethics be damned. :-(
    IT_Guy_z
  • Congressional hearings??

    You mean a politician's entertainment spot, since all the issues of legality or not, belong in the courts, if a prosecutor finds evidence of such, not on stage. "That grand old benevolent,national asylum for the helpless," hasn't changes since Mark Twain made the comment.
    john_galt@...
  • Still confused

    With all the talk,interviews, resignations and congresional hearings, I still don't know who did what, with who's which to who's whom. Very confusing. It appears that the board had an incling that sensitive material was being leaked by someone to someone else and the way they decided to find out who this was, was to impersonate board members and a CNN reporter to get their e-mail and phone logs. Their methods being extremely questionable. I still am not sure if I am correct. If anyone can explain this quickly in laymens terms, I would be very grateful and better informed. I'm not sure I even understand my own explanation.
    flasho