What comes after IE 7?

What comes after IE 7?

Summary: While attending the launch party for IE 7 last night around the corner from our ZDNet offices, I asked Gary Schare, director IE product management, what's coming next for Microsoft's browser. Before he addressed that question, he told positioned IE 7 as a "no-brainer" upgrade for IE 6 users for its security and new features.

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TOPICS: Browser
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While attending the launch party for IE 7 last night around the corner from our ZDNet offices, I asked Gary Schare, director IE product management, what's coming next for Microsoft's browser. Before he addressed that question, he told positioned IE 7 as a "no-brainer" upgrade for IE 6 users for its security and new features. Given that most reviewers don't believe that IE 7 will convince Mozilla users to switch, an IE 6 upgrade is the appropriate characterization. The next milestone is to finish up the Vista version, which Schare said is in its final stages.

What he termed "IE Next"--which he said could be IE 7.5, 8.0 or a new name, although he backed off the latter--hasn't been spec'd out. Schare said his team is listening to the users to find out  what they want, but hasn't yet aggregated the feedback. Improvements to the user interface, more support for Web standards and staying ahead of the hackers are the general areas of focus, he noted.


Chris Wilson, platform architect for IE Next and Gary Schare, IE director of product management

The posture or reality of not knowing more specifically what is coming in IE Next is old company think. The upstarts, including the Mozilla Foundation, are aggressive and public about talking up new feature requests and product goals, providing rolling roadmaps that give users a sense of the future and even participation in the process. It's not just an open source community principle.

Schare expects IE Next to show up in about 18 months. About a year ago, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer defined three twitch cycles or product delivery cadences.  Services, such as MSN, are on a nine month, short twitch cycle and more substantial products, like IE and Office, are on an medium, 18 to 24 month cycle. Major transitions, such Vista and WinFS, are on a long twitch cycle, years and years. 

Topic: Browser

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13 comments
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  • Who cares?

    With Firefox and Opera on the market, IE is an unnecessary headache.

    http://one.revver.com/watch/77164/format/flv/affiliate/23672
    nightman45
  • Kudos to you, Dan...

    ... for a simply reported item that is (relatively speaking) light on the anti-MS spin.
    broper
    • Heavy enough anti-Microsoft spin.

      The near explicit view is that there's a right way to issue new versions, and Microsoft isn't doing it. Also an unsupported statement that IE 7 is insufficient to persuade those who drifted from IE to return.

      In short, anti-Microsoft propaganda.
      Anton Philidor
      • No proaganda

        Anton
        I find it hard to believe that at this point MS doesn't have a good idea of what should be on the list for the next version or point release of IE.
        Secondly, almost all the reviews I have read have said that IE 7 is a great upgrade but not a reason to switch from Mozilla at this point. The director of IE product management told me as much. How is that tanti MS propaganda?
        dbfarber
        • Would have made a good quote, then.

          In your response you noted:

          "The director of IE product management told me as much [that IE 7 is "not a reason to switch from Mozilla at this point."]

          That's different from saying that reviewers you've read have come to that conclusion, as you observed in both the article and in your response.

          And in the article your statement was:
          "Given that most reviewers don't believe that IE 7 will convince Mozilla users to switch, an IE 6 upgrade is the appropriate characterization."

          As you can see, this makes no mention of the director of IE product management, didn't limit the statement about reviewers to those you've seen, and directly states that IE 7 is (only) an IE 6 upgrade rather than substantially new. You didn't call it "a great upgrade" in the article.

          It also assumes without discussion there was good reason to switch to FireFox (as I think you intended, rather than Mozilla) in the first place. That's an assertion requiring justification.

          Not a bad set of criticisms in a single sentence, particularly in an article about a Microsoft celebration.

          And the criticism of Microsoft as inefficient and ineffectual shows when you denigrate the company for doing the same thing as its competitors.

          First you say in the article:
          "Schare said his team is listening to the users to find out what they want, but hasn't yet aggregated the feedback."

          Sounds like a good idea and knowing what's in IE 7 will make user response more productive.

          But in your response to me you say:
          "I find it hard to believe that at this point MS doesn't have a good idea of what should be on the list for the next version or point release of IE."

          So never mind listening to the users?

          Well, other organizations can and do.

          Quoting the article:
          "The posture or reality of not knowing more specifically what is coming in IE Next is old company think.

          [Again, the company should know, on the day IE 7 is released.]

          The upstarts, including the Mozilla Foundation, are aggressive and public about talking up new feature requests

          [But the Mozilla Foundation listens to the users and reflects on the feedback given. Good for them!]

          and product goals, providing rolling roadmaps that give users a sense of the future and even participation in the process."

          So if Microsoft reports on user response and requests, the company will be just as good as the competition, right?

          Doesn't that read to you as Good when Mozilla et al do it and Bad when Microsoft does the same thing?

          Sometimes what seems self-evident can be bias. I think you were unreflective and not intentionally hostile. But you did end by giving the impression of anti-Microsoft propaganda.
          Anton Philidor
          • Bias and under reporting

            There is a clear tendency in these blogs to accentuate the negative when it comes to MS (Mary Jo Foley being the most egregious example), and I'm not sure where it comes from. It seems unwise, particularly with Cnet on the block according to the Mercury News:

            "Also acquisition candidates are Web publishers, such as CNET Networks Inc. `I think will get snatched up by somebody,' said Miller of Spark Capital. Since the start of the year, CNET shares have fallen about 41 percent."

            Ballmer has awfully deep pockets, deeper than Eric Schmidt even ;-)
            broper
  • What comes after IE7 ?

    Pure PC Hell if you are foolish enough to install it!
    BeGoneFool
    • Installing IE7

      what is the problem encountered to discourage the installation of this upgrade?
      rruess@...
  • Getting your head examined...

    is what you should do if you decide to use this piece of crap...

    since im a programmer, i gave it a ride on a test box...

    nice try MS$ but Mozilla is still hands down faster, better or more user friendly...

    just like Jobs said 15 years ago....MS doesn't create ingenuity, they try and buy it....this product just shows they have created nothing new...time to get out the checkbook i guess..

    I like how PC hardware has increased 100-fold in speed and performance in the last 5 years and no matter what products MS$ makes, they take the hardware performance back 7 years...if you think Im wrong take Vista for a spin if you want to turn your CoreDuo into a 486DX2...
    rkostynu@...
  • I'll tell you what comes next...

    ...More viruses, more trojans and more spyware. Get ready.
    james_p
  • Chris Wilson

    Needs to lay off the Hair Activator.
    james_p
  • What comes next probably won't install on WinXP...

    So you'd better get out your credit card, do the economy and Microsoft a favor and go into debt for a new computer that will run Vista.

    Or run an alternative browser that can keep up with the standards because it isn't an OS cancer that cannot be excised or easily upgraded.
    Boomslang
  • pull IE out of the OS

    This is the 500-pound gorilla in the room.

    Baking IE into the OS was technically brain-dead to begin with. It hasn't gotten any better. That deep dependency is a major source of Windows security and stabilty problems.

    MS should've bit the bullet and pulled it out of the OS for IE7. The longer they delay, the tougher the job. I'm guessing they won't pull it out for IE8 either.

    At a future point, that OS dependency will be seen in hindsight as a technical Waterloo.

    And don't get me going on the random/willful/contrarian-for-the-sake-of-Lord-knows-what
    IE7 UI ....

    -- stan
    Stan_Krute