When asked for your ID by the airlines, show them this

When asked for your ID by the airlines, show them this

Summary: By way of Bruce Schneier's blog comes a link to the Identity project which, in offering the 9th Circuit case of John Gilmore as proof, is proposing that if want to preserve our right to fly without I.D.

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TOPICS: Legal
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By way of Bruce Schneier's blog comes a link to the Identity project which, in offering the 9th Circuit case of John Gilmore as proof, is proposing that if want to preserve our right to fly without I.D., then we'd better start exercising that right.  Says the Identity Project's Web site:

Help us help you determine whether the TSA told the 9th Circuit the truth.  Can you fly without ID? According to what the government told the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in the Gilmore case, you can – you need only submit to secondary screening in order to fly anonymously.

Please try doing some or all of your travel by declining to show ID and report back about what happens to you.  Our ultimate intent is to submit declarations from people such as yourself to the court and introduce hard evidence about what TSA's real policies and practices are.

According to the Identity Project's media liason Bill Scannell, the results are already being collated and the TSA is apparently standing behind the letter of the law as long as you don't tell them "Yeah, I've got my I.D. but I'm not going to show it to you."  Final results aren't in yet.  When they come in, I'll post something here.

Topic: Legal

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  • Should be interesting

    The real issue is going to be one of miscommunication. If you go back to the original case, very few of the airport employees (airline employees or security people) knew exactly what the law was, or if there was a law at all. The government (the TSA specifically) refused to admit publicly if such a law actually existed.

    Now that there's some sort of verdict, that we can actually travel without showing our papers (insert quote from your favorite WWII era movie here), the question is whether knowledge of this ruling is widespread. I'd be willing to bet a lot of people who try this will get turned away from being able to board their plane, at least until there's more publicity.
    tic swayback