Market moves: Android Market opens to paid applications

Market moves: Android Market opens to paid applications

Summary: For once the rumors turned out to be true. Google announced today that the Android Market is now accepting paid applications.

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For once the rumors turned out to be true. Google announced today that the Android Market is now accepting paid applications. Developers can go to the publisher website to upload their applications and set the end user pricing now, and starting the middle of next week users will be able to download and pay for them.

[ Read: More about Android on Dev Connection ]

Support for paid applications is already built-in to the RC33 update which was recently rolled out to T-Mobile G1 owners. I'm not sure yet if the 1.1 SDK is required for developers, but as one reader pointed out the new SDK is needed if you want to develop internationalized applications. Most users should have already received RC33 already, so it's probably safe to go ahead and upgrade to the 1.1 SDK now.

Google Checkout will serve as the sole payment and billing mechanism for Android Market (no surprise there). That means developers need to sign up for a merchant account. I tried the signup page earlier today and it was unavailable, but others are reporting no problems getting in.

[ Join: The growing Android community at Planet Android ]

Limitations: As of this writing, developers of paid applications have to be from either the US or the UK, and end users have to be from the US. Google promises to add more countries to the list as soon as possible. By the end of March they expect that developers in Germany, Austria, Netherlands, France, and Spain will be able to charge for programs. End user support for additional countries will be added "in the coming months". Free applications are available now in more countries, with Australia being added this weekend and Singapore in the coming weeks.

[ Learn: How to write Android applications with Hello, Android ]

To celebrate the announcement I'm planning to release a paid application of my own and share my experiences in a new blog series called "Market moves". Join me on this exciting journey!

Topic: Software Development

Ed Burnette

About Ed Burnette

Ed Burnette is a software industry veteran with more than 25 years of experience as a programmer, author, and speaker. He has written numerous technical articles and books, most recently "Hello, Android: Introducing Google's Mobile Development Platform" from the Pragmatic Programmers.

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8 comments
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  • Why...

    Why to pay for anything?? I thought everything was FREE...
    Eeem
    • Who said that? (nt)

      nt
      storm14k
  • Google (big brother) already has your data

    http://www.scroogle.org/


    This is funny, all of the fools who think google is the holy grail are now going to get reamed because now they will pull a MS and start charging...

    They help China censor their 'comrades' and now they own all sorts of private data from searches, gmail and google-analytics that is fools who put this on their website doing free work for them.

    Christian_<><
  • Big difference Android Apps and iPhone apps

    While the OS evangelists won't like it, there is a big difference between Android and something like the iPhone.

    Whenever you talk about "Android" you are talking about the OS!

    When you talk about the Apple competitor, you are talking about a PRODUCT! (iPhone/iPod Touch)

    When will the OS guys understand that you can't brand an OS? Apple isn't selling OSX on the iPhone, it is selling the "experience" of the product - which happens to be running OXS but who cares.

    It should be interesting to see how MS does with their new Microsoft stores. I don't believe they will have any more luck than Linux in trying to sell the OS when they don't sell an MS-Branded complete package (aka MS designed and manufactured computer).

    Oh well, in the MS case there is always that mouse to fall back on...
    croberts
    • I think you have made more out of the OS...

      ...than the average user of an Android device does. Apple isn't selling an OS...right....but neither if Google. It has produced and released an OS free of charge. The phone makers take Android and make and sell and experience. In all honesty the only reason they make sure to attach the Android label at this point is because its attached to Google and that sells. At some point I imagine the Android label will start to fade as the phone makers twist and turn it to make their own custom experience.

      Look at what HP has done to Ubuntu.
      storm14k
  • RE: Market moves: Android Market opens to paid applications

    I was very excited about getting back into mobile development on an open platform until I discovered a) it's not that open and b) you have to code in Java. The last one is a killer for us. Quite possibly the worst language choice Google could have made out of languages reasonably available for mobile cpus.

    They should have gone for python or ruby as a high level option and allowed for C++/C for low level. That would have attracted a world of creative hackers rather than the industrial grey programmers of the Java/C# set. I'm sure there will be some excellent apps by creative devs deployed but it will be an order of magnitude fewer than what it could have been.

    We're passing on Android and reconsidering Symbian again now that it's OS. We'll see... there's presently no good solution for developers in the mobile market. You'd think some hardware vendor looking for market share (or to keep theirs) might get a clue that software is the differentiating factor ultimately so you should do everything you can to win the ultimate programmers over to you. Remember Microsoft anyone???
    scherrey
    • What's wrong with Java?

      > you have to code in Java. The last one is
      > a killer for us. Quite possibly the worst
      > language choice Google could have made out
      > of languages reasonably available for
      > mobile cpus.

      And this is bad because ...? I'm not trying to be facetious; I really want to know why you think Java is such a bad choice.
      Ed Burnette
      • I was wondering the same...

        Its general application programming so just about any language is suitable. For the tasks at hand theres not going to be a ton of advantages for one or the other.

        And honestly Java is one of the most popular programming languages out there, builds on C/C++ and inspired C#. Its not a great idea to be a developer and not know Java or not be interested in working with it.
        storm14k