Polarion blinks in struggle over Subversion

Polarion blinks in struggle over Subversion

Summary: Polarion Software is donating the subversion.com domain name to the Subversion Corporation, a non-profit stewardship organization created to support the development of Subversion. Subversion is a popular open source version control package widely seen as the successor to CVS. The announcement will be made at the SubConf 2007 conference in Munich tomorrow. It ends a three year spat between Polarion, makers of commercial software built on Subversion, and the core developers of Subversion itself.

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TOPICS: Open Source
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Polarion blinks in struggle over SubversionPolarion Software is donating the subversion.com domain name to the Subversion Corporation, a non-profit stewardship organization created to support the development of Subversion. Subversion is a popular open source version control package widely seen as the successor to CVS. The announcement will be made at the SubConf 2007 conference in Munich tomorrow. It ends a three year spat between Polarion, makers of commercial software built on Subversion, and the core developers of Subversion itself.

Karl Fogel, co-creator of Subversion and president of the Subversion Corporation, and Frank Schröder, CEO at Polarion, met before the conference today to sign the papers. "On behalf of the Subversion project," said Fogel, "I wish to thank Polarion for their constructive engagement with the Subversion Corporation and for supporting the long-term interests and growing community around Subversion." Schröder added, "With the formation of The Subversion Corporation, it now makes sense for that body, which represents the open source Subversion community, to take over the subversion.com domain and move forward on related website projects."

Polarion's Subversion-related open source projects will be relocated to tigris.org, where the Subversion project itself is currently hosted. Polarion will use polarion.com and .org, while the Subversion Corporation will use subversion.com and .org.

Polarion and the Subversion community were in the news last year when they clashed over competing projects to create a Subversion plug-in for Eclipse. Polarion proposed their plug-in, called Subversive, to be an official Eclipse project. At about the same time, a project for a community-developed plugin called Subclipse was also proposed. Developers on both sides traded barbs for months on sites like EclipseZone. Eventually, Subversive was approved as an Eclipse technology project, though development of both plug-ins continues. According to a Polarion spokesman, the domain name announcement "doesn't have anything to do" with trying to reconcile the two plug-in projects.

One of the features that differentiated Subversive was its close reliance on TMate's SVNKit library to access Subversion repositories. SVNKit is written in Java (like the Subversive plug-in) so tends to be faster and more stable than the JNI-based JavaHL library favored by Subclipse. However, due to licensing problems with SVNKit, Subversive now defaults to using JavaHL. If you want to use it with SVNKit, you have to get a separate download. Today's agreement isn't likely to change that.

Topic: Open Source

Ed Burnette

About Ed Burnette

Ed Burnette is a software industry veteran with more than 25 years of experience as a programmer, author, and speaker. He has written numerous technical articles and books, most recently "Hello, Android: Introducing Google's Mobile Development Platform" from the Pragmatic Programmers.

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6 comments
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  • eh?

    In the last paragraph,

    [i]However, due to licensing problems with SVNKit, Subversion now defaults to
    using JavaHL[/i]

    Should that be "Subversive now defaults ...", or perhaps "Subclipse now defaults..."?

    It is the case that Subclipse defaults to JavaHL, though it can use SVNKit, so that
    would fit. I don't know about the flexibility of Subversive in this regard.
    jrepenning@...
    • Corrected, thanks.

      nt
      Ed Burnette
  • RE: Polarion blinks in struggle over Subversion

    To be fair, it is worth to say that Subclipse existed for several years before Polarion came with its proposal to Eclipse without contacting Subclipse developers. Subclipse also made proposal for Eclipse project which been also accepted, but then developers decided to withdraw a proposal believing that it will give more flexibility to the project and community to have Subclipse project outside of Eclipse's licensing boundaries

    Another thing worth to mention is that there is no real evidence that SVNKit is being faster and more stable. More over, at the current time, SVNKit haven't got complete support for all Subversion 1.5 features, which already available in JavaHL and also supported by Subclipse.
    ekuleshov
    • Subversion language bindings

      I haven't done any scientific tests but SVNKit definitely feels faster and is less flakey for me on Windows than JavaHL (fewer strange hangs or other problems). One of its problems though, as you point out, is that SVNKit tends to lag Subversion features. It's unfortunate that there isn't an officially supported JavaHL equivalent in pure Java that would always be up to date and would use a permissive license like Apache or BSD.

      Maybe I'm weird but I still prefer CVS over Subversion. It's better integrated into my IDE (Eclipse) and all the CVS servers I've used perform better than the SVN servers I've used. Aside from a few missing features like renaming it does everything I need so I'm not in any hurry to switch.
      Ed Burnette
      • give us some prove

        It would be more fair to do the home work before shouting things like that to the wide auditory. Personally I have quite opposite experience, but I am Subclipse user.
        ekuleshov
      • Message has been deleted.

        RANDY199