AT&T's statement on a single smartphone OS makes little sense

AT&T's statement on a single smartphone OS makes little sense

Summary: An AT&T executive at the Symbian partner event made a statement (Yahoo! News article) that Symbian is "a very credible and likely candidate" to become the single smartphone OS of choice in the future for the wirless carrier. However, there are caveats to that statement that make the news really a non-event IMHO. AT&T stated this consolidation into a single OS is focused on AT&T branded devices. The iPhone is specifically excluded in the interview and RIM may be as well because there is no AT&T branding on the BlackBerry devices. That just leaves Windows Mobile that still has AT&T branded devices, such as the AT&T Tilt. So in reality, hasn't AT&T already consolidated their branded products on a single smartphone OS?

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AT&T QuickfireAn AT&T executive at the Symbian partner event made a statement (Yahoo! News article) that Symbian is "a very credible and likely candidate" to become the single smartphone OS of choice in the future for the wirless carrier. However, there are caveats to that statement that make the news really a non-event IMHO. AT&T stated this consolidation into a single OS is focused on AT&T branded devices. The iPhone is specifically excluded in the interview and RIM may be as well because there is no AT&T branding on the BlackBerry devices. That just leaves Windows Mobile that still has AT&T branded devices, such as the AT&T Tilt. So in reality, hasn't AT&T already consolidated their branded products on a single smartphone OS?I checked and clicked on the AT&T branded devices and see there is actually another AT&T device, the AT&T Quickfire, but is AT&T labeling this a smartphone or a feature phone? So in reality, there are only Windows Mobile AT&T branded smartphones and AT&T shouldn't have a problem with smartphones on many different platforms. Am I the only one missing the point of the AT&T statements? Is AT&T just trying to say they want to switch from Windows Mobile to Symbian? By excluding other devices like the iPhone, and maybe BlackBerry, how is this single smartphone OS going to simplify anything when they already have this single smartphone OS on AT&T branded devices?

Thanks to Sascha Segan at Gearlog for the heads-up on this article.

Topics: Mobility, Hardware, Operating Systems, Smartphones, Software, AT&T

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  • Reducing common denominators

    Symbian has a proven 'track record', is now open source. Coming together with Nokia to furnish a 'branded' line of S60 products makes sense from the standpoint that Nokia will continue to cultivate developer interest in Symbian applications, which has been one of Symbian's finer points. AT&T will have a degree of control over aspects of porting they might not have otherwise ever have considered, although initially they might not do their own development.

    It makes sense to me Matt.
    no_zd_user_name
  • Smith never said that

    It makes no sense, because he never said it. The Yahoo story
    is wrong.

    http://blog.openitstrategies.com/2008/12/just-say-no-to-
    smartphone-monopolies.html
    SVOSRP