Bah Humbug: Apple countersues Nokia for infringing on 13 patents

Bah Humbug: Apple countersues Nokia for infringing on 13 patents

Summary: A couple of months ago Nokia filed suit against Apple for using 10 wireless technologies they patented without compensation. It looks like Apple is getting into the holiday spirit by countersuing Nokia stating that Nokia is infringing on 13 Apple patents. There are no details yet on what those 13 patents pertain to so we will have to keep an eye out to see what Apple believes Nokia took from them. I wonder how hard Apple had to dig to find more patents than Nokia accused them of stealing?

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TOPICS: Legal, Apple, Nokia
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A couple of months ago Nokia filed suit against Apple for using 10 wireless technologies they patented without compensation. It looks like Apple is getting into the holiday spirit by countersuing Nokia stating that Nokia is infringing on 13 Apple patents. There are no details yet on what those 13 patents pertain to so we will have to keep an eye out to see what Apple believes Nokia took from them. I wonder how hard Apple had to dig to find more patents than Nokia accused them of stealing?

Bruce Sewell, Apple's General Counsel stated, "Other companies must compete with us by inventing their own technologies, not just by stealing ours."

Sounds to me like someone is bitter, huh?

Thanks to my pal Rene Ritchie for the heads-up on the press release.

UPDATE: More information about the suit has surfaced and according to The iPhone Blog Apple is suing Nokia for UI patents. How can this be when most of the US mobile press slams Nokia for an interface that is old and outdated? I always said there is very little difference in the way the Symbian OS looks (tap an icon, launch an app) compared to the iPhone, but the thing is Nokia has been doing it for a LOT longer. Maybe Nokia should be suing Apple for UI patents instead.

Topics: Legal, Apple, Nokia

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7 comments
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  • "Holiday spirit."

    You're right, of course; the holiday season is not the time to assert your
    intellectual property rights.
    msalzberg
  • RE: Bah Humbug: Apple countersues Nokia for infringing on 13 patents

    "I always said there is very little difference in the way the Symbian OS looks (tap an icon, launch an app) compared to the iPhone, but the thing is Nokia has been doing it for a LOT longer. Maybe Nokia should be suing Apple for UI patents instead."

    LOL! You got it right. Symbian even have started such since its OS was created, even, most phones with such iconic features (back from monochrome) even though not touchscreen but the concept is all the same, point (choose) and click (tap).

    iPhone/Pod-touch just made it a little better but not new. Speaking about UI.
    albalain
  • And a Partridge in a Pear Tree

    Apple have got some nerve, although its expected they'd defend themselves, I suppose.

    I still have the Symbian-based Moto A100 that, well, does exactly what the iPhones interface does in that respect. Perhaps Apple should sue Motorola too, for pre-emptively using Apple-patented features, the swines!

    Its not like Apple invented the touch UI anyway - perhaps the first with ability to stick two fingers up to it, but thats all.

    How many Lawyers Leaping was it now?
    SiO2
  • The sorry state of tech news (and those who read it.)

    Funny that all you people, including the original author, feel the need
    to comment without doing even the most cursory research to
    understand the issue. First, without knowing the specifics of which UI
    elements Apple is suing over, NO ONE, including Mr. Miller, is in ANY
    position to make anything but hot air over the issue. That's fine if you
    are filling a balloon, but not so much if you are being paid to write. I
    certainly hope you do not refer to your employment status as
    "journalist."

    As for the UI, CLEARY no one in the present discussion understands
    Apple's UI patents. If you did, you would not be making such
    misinformed claims such as implying that Apple has a patent on
    MultiTouch, or "touch interfaces." They do NOT. In fact, their patents
    involve the heuristics behind the device being able to determine which
    of a large number of possibilities a particular input paradigm is
    intended but the user. A perfect example of this is the Verizon
    Voyager. Both devices allow you to swipe your finger across the screen
    to scrub through lists. But while Apple's heuristics apparently figure
    out this intention with close to 100% accuracy, the heuristics
    employed by the Voyager are infamous for getting it wrong,
    interpreting the motion as a click, as a horizontal swipe instead of a
    vertical one, as a click and drag, and any number of other miscues
    that lead to the interface being annoying and frustrating. Remember
    last year when everyone was calling the Voyager the iPhone killer?
    Does anyone even remember the Voyager anymore?!? Care to venture
    a guess as to why that is?

    And sorry, but the temporal comparison to Symbian is mindless and
    clearly misguided. The fact that Symbian was around before the
    iPhone has nothing to do with the central issue. And again, without
    knowing the specifics of what Apple is claiming, venturing an opinion
    is just hand-waving.

    As for how far Apple had to dig, probably not that deeply at all. There
    is no reason to believe that Apple was not just simply sitting on the
    issue, seeing how the market played out. Once Nokia pulled the
    trigger with their initial suit, it upped the ante for Apple, and they
    went into gear. This is STANDARD practice in patent law.
    SpiritusInMachina
    • Inquirer Inspired Tech Reporting

      Nice post.

      I don't think that the writers at ZDNet are all that interested specifics,
      facts, or even the truth. Perhaps there are motives around swaying opinion about certain products and services, perhaps not. It is easy to
      see that the more popular bloggers are the ones that stir up the most agitation in the readership by writing the best baloney.

      I read ZDNet for the shear entertainment of it. It is amazing what tripe
      someone will write and even more amazing how people respond to it.
      It's difficult not to get caught up in it sometimes.

      Cheers
      CowLauncher
    • The sorry state of apple fanboys

      1) I wouldn't have known apple were suing someone if I hadn't read here. Ergo, this tech reporting thing works-out OK for me.

      2) I don't mind people poking a bit of fun at apple. I own a MacBook Pro, and still find it laughable when someone writes a response nearing double the length of the initial article when someone criticises apple.
      Li1t
      • Al Qaeda fanbois

        So what you are saying is that, if Usama Bin Laden were to put out a
        press release on September 11, 2001, proclaiming that he had nothing to
        do with the attack, then, since you hadn't heard about it before, that that
        "works for you"? Apparently accurate information is less important to you
        than simply being told what to think. Ergo.

        The length of the response really has no bearing on its legitimacy. But
        wait, I forgot, legitimacy is not really your concern, is it?
        That said, you might want to check your facts. My post was significantly
        shorter than the original article. Oh wait, facts don't matter much to you,
        either.
        SpiritusInMachina