Hands-on with the AT&T HTC Pure Windows Mobile 6.5 device

Hands-on with the AT&T HTC Pure Windows Mobile 6.5 device

Summary: Back in May I had the chance to check out the GSM HTC Touch Diamond2 and this weekend we saw AT&T jumping the gun and selling their new HTC Pure device that is the US version of the Diamond2. I won't go into all the details that I did back in that review since the specs are the same with a very similar form factor. I will instead focus in this post on some things specific to the HTC Pure on AT&T. You can read about my take on the Windows Mobile 6.5 operating system that is preinstalled on the HTC Pure. I put together a small image gallery and a video of the HTC Pure so you can see what it is like.

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Back in May I had the chance to check out the GSM HTC Touch Diamond2 and this weekend we saw AT&T jumping the gun and selling their new HTC Pure device that is the US version of the Diamond2. I won't go into all the details that I did back in that review since the specs are the same with a very similar form factor. I will instead focus in this post on some things specific to the HTC Pure on AT&T. You can read about my take on the Windows Mobile 6.5 operating system that is preinstalled on the HTC Pure. I put together a small image gallery and a video of the HTC Pure so you can see what it is like. While I would personally not consider the device, the $150 price after rebate and contract is quite attractive.


Image Gallery:A walk around the HTC Pure Windows Mobile 6.5 device. Image Gallery: HTC Pure retail box width= Image Gallery: HTC Pure in hand

The HTC Pure is another nice device from HTC and the only hardware issues I have is the lack of a 3.5mm headset jack and lack of a trackball or other some type of navigation controller. I have come to realize I am not a huge fan of devices without some kind of controller like the trackball on the Sprint HTC Hero because there are times when I want to scroll around and cannot with the touchscreen. I love the compact form factor and beautiful display though. I am not impressed with the amount of AT&T bloatware and the incomplete Windows Mobile 6.5 operating system.

Specifications

: The HTC Pure has the following specifications:

  • Windows Mobile 6.5 operating system
  • Qualcomm MSM 7200A 528MHz processor
  • 512MB ROM/288MB RAM (about 250MB ROM and 95MB RAM available for the user)
  • 3.2 inch 480x800 WVGA display
  • Quad-band GSM (850/900/1800/1900 MHz) and Dual-band HSDPA (900/2100 MHz)
  • Integrated GPS receiver
  • Integrated Bluetooth 2.0 with A2DP support
  • Integrated 802.11 b/g radio
  • Integrated FM radio
  • G-sensor accelerometer
  • 5 megapixel camera with auto focus
  • 1100 mAh lithium-ion polymer battery
  • microSD card slot with support for SDHC capacities
  • Dimensions: 4.32 x 2.1 x 0.59 inches, 6.28 ounces

Walk around the hardware: On the front of the device you will see the beautiful 3.2 inch 480x800 display that is the primary standout feature of the HTC Pure. The rest of the hardware is mostly the same as the Touch Diamond2. I was disappointed to see that there is no 3.5mm headset jack and expect this on every new smartphone. The HTC Pure feels great in your hand and is a very pocketable and powerful unit. There is glossy black finish used on most of the Pure so it is quite the fingerprint magnet.

Walk around the software: The HTC Pure is loaded with Windows Mobile 6.5, but HTC also has their TouchFLO 3D layer on top of this software. When you press the Start button you are taken to the new WM 6.5 Start screen that cannot be customized or optimized for your usage. Pressing Today takes you to TouchFLO 3D by default, although you can go into the Settings and uncheck this toggle if you want to use the new WM 6.5 Today screen. TouchFLO 3D is quite good on the HTC Pure and even though there is an AT&T bloatware panel you can choose to hide this panel or change the order of the panels.

While I appreciate some services from AT&T, I hate that they place so much of their subscription and application trials on their devices with no easy way to remove them or in many cases even know the costs associated with using them. Thankfully T-Mobile adds very little of this junk to their devices, like my T-Mobile Touch Pro2.

For just $150 after $50 mail-in rebate the HTC Pure is a compelling device for those looking for a touchscreen smartphone that is not an iPhone. I like my QWERTY keyboards too much to give my Touch Pro2 up for the Pure, but HTC shows they can pack a ton into a small compact form factor.

Topics: Mobility, Hardware, HTC, Mobile OS, Operating Systems, Software, AT&T, Wi-Fi, Windows

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