AMD launches marketing campaign to capitalize on Intel's Sandy Bridge flaw

AMD launches marketing campaign to capitalize on Intel's Sandy Bridge flaw

Summary: While Intel is still the king of CPUs, chief competitor AMD can't ignore an opportunity to take advantage of a misstep by its rival. With Intel still smarting from the chipset flaw that is marring the rollout of its new Sandy Bridge processors, AMD announced a new marketing campaign that takes a swipe with its tagline.

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While Intel is still the king of CPUs, chief competitor AMD can't ignore an opportunity to take advantage of a misstep by its rival. With Intel still smarting from the chipset flaw that is marring the rollout of its new Sandy Bridge processors, AMD announced a new marketing campaign that takes a swipe with its tagline.

The campaign's title is “Ready. Willing. And Stable,” which doesn't take a chip engineer to figure out the reference, though the marketing is designed to appeal to enthusiasts who will actually know the recent history of Sandy Bridge's launch. AMD will run ads on several DIY sites, linking to a page on AMD's site (partially shown above) that touts the advantages of its Phenom II X6 processors over Intel's latest. (Whether they're valid claims will be left for the fanboys to argue over.)

AMD's announcement follows its Valentine Day's stunt, which entailed a package sent to tech writers like CNET's Dan Ackerman that offered condolences (and chocolates) for the recent heartbreak that "Sandy B." caused. Even though the Sandy Bridge flaw is a fairly minor one that most buyers wouldn't even notice, any opening Intel could offer AMD would be foolish to pass up.

The big question, though: Are you any more likely to buy an AMD processor or AMD-based system now as a result of the Sandy Bridge debacle? Let us know in the Comments section.

Topics: Intel, Hardware, Processors

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  • RE: AMD launches marketing campaign to capitalize on Intel's Sandy Bridge flaw

    No, not because of Sandy Bridge debacle. After all, everone has a bad day once and a while (Toyota?) However, I am starting to take note of AMD as a viable competitor. Especially for those who aren't always able to pay top dollar for a PC...

    Jeff - CQVoIP.net
    cqvoip.net
    • AMD is the best bang per performance

      @cqvoip.net People spend extra money for negligible performance boost that they actually don't need. Most Intel buyers (home), the performance of an OLD single core Athlon is more than enough.<br><br>In fact, for most consumers an ATOM computer is enough to meet their needs.
      wackoae
      • At least 2 cores

        @wackoae Suit yourself. When I built my current machine, I went from a single-core Athlon 64 to a quad-core. What a difference! It's easy to forget how much stuff Windows wants to run "in the background." The search indexer, Google desktop if you have that (I do), the antivirus stuff, backup programs... It's always something.

        Having a second processor to handle that stuff is worth every penny.
        Robert Hahn
      • Having hundreds of cores will make no difference

        @wackoae if the software and the OS does not take advantage of it. Most services and software run on the 1st core and the 2nd is never touched.

        Also, your complete list shows that you like installing crapware in your computer. You can put tons of cores and that will not fix the DAU problem.
        wackoae
      • You're only right when it comes to lighter-weight users

        @wackoae

        And with that delineation, that's fine. It is all that many will need. The same cannot be said for power users, which make up a healthy percentage of the readers of this site. The advantages of multicore processing then manifest themselves in a myriad of ways. I'm tempted to say you missed the Core revolution stemming from the Netburst meltdown, but I know you're smarter than that.

        Extra RAM, GPU and HDD (particularly SSD) all help with bottom line performance by alleviating bottlenecks, but as soon as prices dropped on the Core platform (and some units were quite reasonable from the get-go), it basically became a checkmate proposition.
        klumper
      • I only buy AMD machines

        Long time ago (k7 pentium days) I learned not to rely on Intel. AMD has never disappointed me. On the other hand, those close to me who bought I5 and I7 units are now finding out why staying away from Intel makes good business sense.
        Uralbas
      • RE: AMD launches marketing campaign to capitalize on Intel's Sandy Bridge flaw

        I have to agree, I'm running a athlon II X2 250 with geforce 450 graphics and it handles new game titles and of course daily computing with ease. I'm going to build an even lower power amd zacate computer for HTPC, its suppose to pretty much handle all multimedia without trouble. That being said intels core i3 version of sandy bridge should be a pretty good bang for your buck and I would probably recommend it for the average computer user.
        kroguej
      • RE: AMD launches marketing campaign to capitalize on Intel's Sandy Bridge flaw

        @wacko
        Haha... Thats funny. win7 on an old single core athlon???? Are you trying to make a joke or something? Yep that socket A loaded to the maximum 512mb of sdram @ 75-100mhz would be perfectly fine for most everyone today, huh? Thats a joke right?

        Then to person that says have at least 2 cores you come out saying 100s of cores....?? Software wont make a difference??? most services will run all on 1 core the 2nd core is never touched??? Sounds like something you would here 6yrs ago. You dont know anything about what your are speaking about. Anyone who buys a new PC today with a modern OS, win7, will have all the cores used by the OS automatically even if no programs are ran with multi-core support. If you ever get a chance to check out a multicore PC, watch the CPU usage especially when loading and shutting down. If you dont know how you can do this with the task manager or a gadget. You will see clearly that the OS is not using one core at all, even though the services or software may be single threaded.
        As far as an atom goes, i think the sales alone prove that only the ppl who can get by with an atom are using it. Do your self a favor and google "atom slow" and you will see magnitudes of common, everyday ppl with little PC skills or needs complaing on how Atom is just not suiting their needs well. funny that huh? and these are ppl who bought a net book which they bought for doing extremely light PC task!
        Ocre
      • RE: AMD launches marketing campaign to capitalize on Intel's Sandy Bridge flaw

        double post
        Ocre
  • AMD needs to answer to changing trends

    AMD has always been a practical choice amongst gamers and hobbyists who build a new machine for themselves every year or so.

    Until recently, the traditional wisdom is that, if you do build a PC to last at least 5 years, go with the best Intel CPU you can afford. Its better performance will justify the higher initial cost over the longer period of usage.

    Paradigms for desktop computing are changing. Gamers will still build their monster rigs with powerful (and power-guzzling) GPUs. But people are now also building smaller, quieter and more power-efficient media devices to complement their A/V systems. Cloud-based computing and web-based applications are also obviating heavy hardware investments on the user side.

    It will not be just a Intel-AMD duopoly anymore. I don't see why we shouldn't be seeing ARM and nVidia OEMs selling their CPUs and boards alongside Intel and AMD.

    AMD should answer more to this emerging trend, and not just reiterate its position as a best-value brand, because that may literally not be true for long.
    Tech watcher
    • Sounds like you never had an AMD computer

      @Tech watcher Intelligent people would care more about the quality of the MOTHERBOARD and the PSU than the CPU.

      Pretty much any CPU will last 5+ years regardless of the brand. On the other hand, many motherboards don't last that long. And cheap PSUs are the #1 reason why many computer parts fail early in life.
      wackoae
      • Yeah, you caught me, I'm a Intel fanboy, but...

        @wackoae I totally agree with you that power-supply units are the first to go. On the 3-year Intel machine I built, I already had to replace it 3 times.<br><br>I also agree with you that the motherboard is more susceptible to quality-control issues than the CPU itself. The mobo is and ever will be a crazy-quilt of components of various compositions from all over, and getting one to last 5+ years can be simply a matter of luck. (I had an Intel-made board that died after running Windows XP for 7 years.)<br><br>But back to the main topic. My initial point regarding AMD is that, because its CPUs are cheaper than Intel's, enthusiasts can afford to upgrade their rigs more often to hit their desired ceiling of performance more frequently. This isn't a snide way of saying that AMD chips are less reliable than Intel. <br><br>Furthermore, as we all know, this is no longer becoming the main drive behind CPU sales, thanks to the advent of the mobile processors.
        Tech watcher
      • Cheap PSU's

        @wackoae

        Biggest Epic Fail of most OEMs. Bad power is a big killer of computers and components. I never skimp on parts when building my computers for myself or family/friends and avoid cheap PSU's and Motherboards as my first step. Also a battery backup unit is highly recommended component of any computer I recommend.
        bobiroc
  • RE: AMD launches marketing campaign to capitalize on Intel's Sandy Bridge flaw

    've never used AMD processor but right now am using Radeon HD 5850 (HP Envy 17) and this is my last AMD graphics card as usual I had to go with NVIDIA. AMD your graphics driver is crap and BTW am using the latest one
    shellcodes_coder
  • RE: AMD launches marketing campaign to capitalize on Intel's Sandy Bridge flaw

    Used AMD when they were the king with 64 bit.

    Used Intel when they came out with the Core 2, and that's what I currently use.

    Dunno exactly where I'll go from here, though.

    CPUs seem to have lost their importance with GPUs becoming general purpose machines in their own right, and with games simply not pushing graphics to their limits anymore.

    A lot of games are being designed with consoles in mind - which are currently horribly dated and underpowered compared to PCs. So I'm getting Xbox 360 or PS3 graphics on a system that is capable of handling so much more, because the games are basically ports of the console versions.

    So I dunno what I'll be getting next. Despite the age of my Core 2 Quad and with Intel making newer CPUs, nothing's really pushing its limits anymore. I'm more concerned about my hard drive and memory these days.
    CobraA1
    • I have to agree, the CPU strength for the desktop is taking a backseat

      It's all about the memory and GPU, even other programs are starting to follow that idea.
      Michael Alan Goff
    • @goff256: The future is fusion

      .. and AMD have that in spades over Intel - it is after all the premise behind their latest and new / developing chip designs.

      Granted, recent years have seen Intel take the initiative and dominate the market.

      .. the pieces are in motion and AMD is back in the game.
      thx-1138_
  • RE: AMD launches marketing campaign to capitalize on Intel's Sandy Bridge flaw

    Remember this;-

    286 + 100 = 386
    386 + 100 = 486
    486 + 100 = ...
    ...
    Pentium
    alsobannedfromzdnet
  • In a word, No

    In the past, I bought a couple of AMD based computers because the processors were on a par with Intel chips and I wanted to, in my very small way, encourage competition. However, Intel's CPUs now blow the doors off of AMD's chips, and there is just no going back. If you want a budget priced, OK performance processor - go with AMD. If you want the Best, go with Intel. (The SB chipset gaff is a blib. Hardware makers are already putting out replacements.)
    jpr75_z
  • Better Linux Support from AMD

    My next processor will definitely be an AMD Phenom II. AMD has shown much more support for Linux throughout their product line. Intel's latest i3, i5 and i7 processors tend to suck under Linux, due to a lack of support from Intel for the onboard graphics capabilities of those processors under Linux. So goodbye Intel, hello AMD!
    parnote