AMD Radeon HD 4770: Great graphics for $99

AMD Radeon HD 4770: Great graphics for $99

Summary: AMD has made the eagerly-anticipated Radeon HD 4770 GPU official. Although it is based on some of the most advanced technology--it's the first GPU manufactured using a 40nm process and has nearly as many transistors as the flagship Radeon HD 4890--it is neither the company's fastest nor most costly GPU.

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TOPICS: Processors, Hardware, PCs
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AMD has made the eagerly-anticipated Radeon HD 4770 GPU official. Although it is based on some of the most advanced technology--it's the first GPU manufactured using a 40nm process and has nearly as many transistors as the flagship Radeon HD 4890--it is neither the company's fastest nor most costly GPU.

The first Radeon HD 4770 cards with 512MB of memory cost around $110, but AMD says a rebate will push the cost just below a hundred dollars. That puts the new cards right between the Radeon HD 4670, which starts at around $70, and the top-of-the-line Radeon HD 4800 series, which starts at around $150 (not counting the Radeon HD 4830). The 4800 series cards are also available in dual GPU (X2) configurations.

Don't let the bargain price fool you. In terms of performance, the new GPU rivals the Radeon HD 4850 thanks to several features--750MHz core clock, fast GDDR5 memory--it shares with the Radeon HD 4870. That leaves the Radeon HD 4830 in a bit of an awkward spot, and perhaps AMD will cut the prices on that card to clear out inventory. Nvidia may also be forced to make some changes. Though it is designed to go head-to-head with GeForce 9800 GT, which starts at about $115, the Radeon HD 4770 not only outperformed it, but on many tests also performed on par with the GeForce 9800 GTX+, which costs at least $130.

Cards based on the Radeon HD 4770 are already available from Asus, Gigabyte, HIS, PowerColor, Sapphire and XFX. Here's some of the extensive reviews coverage:

Separately, AMD announced a faster dual-core Athlon processor priced at $69. The 2.8GHz Athlon X2 7850 is a "Black Edition" chip, which means it can easily be over-clocked using AMD's OverDrive utility to boost performance. These dual-core Black Edition parts have reportedly been over-clocked to around 3.3GHz. AMD is pushing the Athlon X2 7850--combined with a Radeon HD 4000 series card, such as the $99 Radeon HD 4770, and the 7-series chipset--as a good value for gamers. And frankly it's hard to argue with them on this one.

Topics: Processors, Hardware, PCs

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7 comments
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  • Crossfire that, and you've got great performance.

    If gamers would get two of 4770s instead of a 4890, they'll get a much better performance and that's a bargain!

    But I'd rather go with a 4750 and underclock to match the performance of a 4670 as I'll get a better and lower power consumption than just a 4670.

    I'm all for energy efficiency as much as I can get as I will not plan to do gaming that much (CoD4, Far Cry, and Oblivion at 1280x720 being the one, but it'd be nice to play Prince of Persia at 1920x1080). I do have Neverwinter Nights, but I got tired of "doom, doom, doom..." as it's no fun for me, despite that I play RPG.
    Grayson Peddie
  • The tests I saw showed it

    coming very close to a GTs 25o - quite a step up. AMD may have another huge winner here - especially for those who are struggling with smaller PSUs.
    chrome_slinky@...
  • No CUDA, no sale

    I recently bought a Nvidia 9800 GT and a Nvidia 9800 GTX for my 2 computers. I don't do much gaming - I bought them to run BOINC software on. In less than 1 month, the GTX card has spit out almost 150,000 credits - which is equal to about 10 years of my SETI credits. 10 years worth in 3 weeks! Maybe now I'll move up in the rankings!

    This is due to Nvidia's CUDA which allows processing to be done on the GPU. The ATI card might be faster, but if I can't use that GPU for BOINC - I'll get one that can. No sale ATI (also, Nvidia works better with Linux). Both of my computers have AMD chips in them . . .
    Roger Ramjet
    • ATI support planned for BOINC 6.10

      http://boinc.berkeley.edu/trac/milestone/6.10
      Ed Burnette
  • Low bus - not good.

    It's got the processor, but no bandwidth. It has a 128bit memory bus. Now for those who play First Person shooters, it's too low and you'll replace the card sooner than you would the 4830. Now, it does have 640 streaming processors, but so does the 4830.

    Put it this way, you can do all you want with the processing on the card, but if you can't push the data out fast enough, it'll act as slow as older video cards.

    I'll still buy the 4830 or 4850 over the 4770.
    Maarek Stele
    • GDDR5

      The GDDR5 has twice the bandwith of GDDR3 found on the 4850 and 4830. This gives the 4770 memory bandwidth very close to the 4830. From the reviews I've seen the 4770 performs better than the 4830 but not quite up to par with the 4850.
      jeremy.young1@...
      • I think you missed the point...

        You can have all the bandwidth in the world, the bus is still a bottleneck. See: GTX 295
        Spiritusindomit@...