DirectX 11 laptop graphics war heating up? Nvidia's mobile Fermi coming next month, according to Eurocom.

DirectX 11 laptop graphics war heating up? Nvidia's mobile Fermi coming next month, according to Eurocom.

Summary: ATI had a good lead over Nvidia in the latest desktop graphics skirmish, getting its Radeon HD 5870 to market several months before its rival's GeForce GTX 480 reached online shops and gaming PC manufacturers. But that lead time appears to be a lot shorter on the laptop front, if one of Eurocom's product pages is to be believed.

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TOPICS: Laptops
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ATI had a good lead over Nvidia in the latest desktop graphics skirmish, getting its Radeon HD 5870 to market several months before its rival's GeForce GTX 480 reached online shops and gaming PC manufacturers. But that lead time appears to be a lot shorter on the laptop front, if one of Eurocom's product pages is to be believed.

While the ATI Mobility Radeon HD 5870 graphics card is just hitting gaming laptops, it appears that Nvidia is readying its new high-end mobile offering for a June launch. Laptop seller Eurocom is listing a Fermi DX11 card for two of its desktop-replacement notebooks, even though Nvidia hasn't announced the graphics board yet. (Fermi is the name for the company's latest graphics architecture, used in the GTX 480.) Interestingly enough, when Engadget first reported this discovery, Eurocom was listing it as the GTX 480M, but that part number has been removed based on my recent search of the site. According to the site, the board supports DirectX 11, comes with 2GB of DDR5 RAM, and requires 100 watts of power—yes, 100 watts.

Whatever this card will wind up being called, Eurocom is asking a $380 premium over the 1GB Mobility Radeon HD 5870. That means it better be as extremely scorching in its performance as it no doubt will be sitting on your lap.

Topic: Laptops

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3 comments
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  • 100W?!?? Ouch!

    I feel like the professor in "Back to the Future", when he was ranting about the power requirements of the time-machine... "1.2 Gigawatts????"

    But seriously - 100 Watts just for the GPU??? In a notebook? Ouch ouch ouch... My new Thinkpad T410s with discrete Nvidia NVS switchable graphics (nowhere near as powerful as a Fermi card, but still) takes less than 95W. For the entire laptop - CPU, screen, SSD, GPU, RAM, speakers, etc.

    I'm starting to wonder about NVidia's much-vaunted (by them, anyway) Fermi architecture... if they can't scale it down to lower power-requirements, it's never going to get widespread use in notebooks.
    kirkaiya@...
    • actually, 100W is good for performance mobile - some mobile chips hit 150

      The Mobility Radeon HD 5870 Crossfire (2 cards), draws 120 Watts. A GTX 200M draws 150. Some older ATIs are well over 100W, as well.

      These notebooks target gamers, but usually have a low power mode or even a separate GPU for when not gaming. I've run my gaming laptop on an 80W inverter (it can draw up to 130W, 75 from GPU alone).
      Clewin
  • Power requirements..

    It seems that this time around (DX-11), Nvidia has been trying desperatly to strip the performance crown from ATI/AMD. They may have done that with the Fermi, but at a cost of heat and poor power efficiency. This seems to be the issue with latecomers to the GPU game.

    When the first DX 10 cards came out, they were beasts, not only in power requirements, but in cost and performance. Nvidia debuted with the G80 Gforce 8800 GTX, and while a great performer, it was a power hog that could heat your house. AMD/ATI came along late to the game with the 2900 series that were unfortunately not better performers, but which needed far more juice. It wasn't until the 2nd and 3rd generation DX 10 cards that ATI shifted their focus onto efficiency, whereas nVidia has gone the exact opposite road, and shot for performance above all else, seriously putting a damper on your power bills.

    This time around, nVidia is late to the game, but even though they have the fastest single core GPU, it comes again at the cost in your pocket when it comes to paying your hydro bill. AMD/ATi have learned their lesson and learned it well by trying to keep good performance and effiency in the same package. Here's hoping that nVidia will learn that lesson with their 2nd and 3rd generation DX 11 offerings, and start to curtail some of that heat and power output.
    Papamambo