Top iOS Apps lists not boding well for BYOD

Top iOS Apps lists not boding well for BYOD

Summary: BYOD doesn't have a chance of taking hold unless we evolve into primates who walk upright with devices that are ready to go to work.

SHARE:

I know it's going to be a bad when my fortune cookie reads, "Fortune not available: Abort, Retry, Continue?", I see a list on Yahoo! from the Associated Press titled, "The top iPhone and iPad Apps on App Store" and it looks like a list of the favorite Apps of everyone under the age of 12. Yep, it's a very bad day, indeed for someone who writes a Consumerization Blog and for someone who evangelizes the advantages of BYOD. I had to ask myself, "Have we de-evolved so far back into the past that perhaps we shouldn't have advanced computing devices at all?" If we're wanting to bring our own devices to work, shouldn't we develop as modern humans with the capacity to use those devices for actual work?

I'm not saying games are bad, necessarily, just that they have no place in the workplace.

How will you convince your employer to allow you to bring your own device to work when it looks as if you're only using it as a toy or social networking communicator? It doesn't do much for our BYOD case, now does it? If you were an employer and all you saw on your employee's tablet was a bunch of games, would you be willing to allow this person to use that same device for 'work?' I would be suspicious and leery of doing so. I might have a different perspective than most because I've been an employer, so that tends to taint my otherwise rose-colored glasses on the topic.

But, before I go further into this tirade rant informative article, here is the list of Apps that has thoroughly disappointed me with the App-buying public:

App Store Official Charts for the week ending Jan. 9, 2012:

Top Paid iPhone Apps:

1. Angry Birds (Clickgamer.com) 2. Fruit Ninja (Halfbrick Studios) 3. Camera+ (tap tap tap) 4. Where's My Water? (Disney) 5. Words With Friends (Zynga) 6. Cut the Rope (Chillingo Ltd.) 7. Tiny Wings (Andreas Illiger) 8. MADDEN NFL 12 by EA SPORTS (Electronic Arts) 9. Bejeweled (PopCap) 10. TETRIS (Electronic Arts)

Top Free iPhone Apps:

1. Temple Run (Imangi Studios, LLC) 2. Doodle Sprint! (Wivvu) 3. Zombie Farm (The Playforge, LLC) 4. the Sheeps Free (Ivan Starchenkov) 5. Pocket Potions (Breaktime Studios) 6. Social Girl (Crowdstar Inc.) 7. Dice With Buddies Free (Stofle Designs) 8. Facebook (Facebook, Inc.) 9. Instagram (Burbn, Inc.) 10. Global War Riot (Addmired, Inc.)

Top Paid iPad Apps:

1. MONOPOLY for iPad (Electronic Arts) 2. Where's My Water? (Disney) 3. SCRABBLE for iPad (Electronic Arts) 4. TETRIS for iPad (Electronic Arts) 5. Words With Friends HD (Zynga) 6. Angry Birds HD (Chillingo Ltd.) 7. Pages (Apple) 8. THE GAME OF LIFE for iPad (Electronic Arts) 9. Real Racing 2 HD (Firemint Pty Ltd.) 10. MADDEN NFL 12 by EA SPORTS For iPad (Electronic Arts)

Top Free iPad Apps:

1. Temple Run (Imangi Studios, LLC) 2. Pinball HD Collection (OOO Gameprom) 3. The Weather Channel for iPad (The Weather Channel Interactive) 4. Skype for iPad (Skype Software S.a.r.l) 5. iBooks (Apple) 6. Bejeweled Blitz (PopCap) 7. Angry Birds HD Free (Rovio Mobile Ltd.) 8. Words With Friends HD Free (Zynga) 9. Kindle — Read Books, Magazines & More — Over 1 Million eBooks & Newspapers (AMZN Mobile LLC) 10. Facebook (Facebook, Inc.)

Now, for my rancid analytic commentary.

Seriously, people? This is what you buy when you have the most advanced computing devices since the original IBM mainframes. With the exception of Pages (and possibly Skype--that one can go either way), you've bought games. That's right, games. You should be ashamed of yourselves, squandering good money on such nonsense.

I'm guessing that you're going to quote the O.G. Star Trek series episode, "Shore Leave," where Kirk states, "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play." To which I respond, "Blah blah blah, I'm not buying it."

Here's a list of 20 productivity Apps that you should have purchased, or downloaded free of charge, for your awesome slab of electronic crack or your smarter-than-you phone that have absolutely nothing to do with flinging happiness-impaired fowls at oddly fortified swine or social networking:

1. Citrix Receiver 2. VNC 3. RDP 4. vSphere Client 5. iSSH 6. Quickoffice 7. FileApp Pro 8. Fing 9. Printer Pro 10. Dragon Dictation 11. VMware View 12. Fing 13. Ubuntu One Files 14. iSQLQuery 15. PlainText 16. Dropbox 17. Time Zones 18. hypOps 19. SharePlus Lite 20. Zoho Docs

And, while I'm at it, I need to tell you that I'd never allow a jailbroken device on my network. So, if your device has been jailbroken, you need to unjailbreak it and put it back to original standards. If you update it to iOS 5.x, I think it does that for you but I'm not 100 percent certain on that because I don't jailbreak my devices.

If you want to bring your own device, you might have to make a concession or two along the way. It's a world of give and take. It can't all be benefit and no burden.

If you don't want to uninstall all of your games and social networking Apps, at least copy them to their own folders and then move those folders to their own App page so that they're not blatantly staring back at your employer, taunting him, teasing him and defying him into making the same frivolous leisure time purchases that you have.

The next time I see a list like this, I'd love to see more than one productivity App on it. Ones that say, "We're serious about the opportunity and the privilege to bring our own devices to work." And, then actually work with them.

What do you think? Do you think your employer should be upset to see games and social networking Apps on your personal device that you want to use for work? Talk back and let me know.

Topics: Microsoft, Apple, Collaboration, iPad, Mobile OS, Mobility, Software

About

Kenneth 'Ken' Hess is a full-time Windows and Linux system administrator with 20 years of experience with Mac, Linux, UNIX, and Windows systems in large multi-data center environments.

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

74 comments
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • RE: Top iOS Apps lists not boding well for BYOD

    Ken maybe this tells us that people are using cloud based or web apps to do work. I know I do and don't really use any iPad native apps for work work but do for personal productivity stuff. The thing about work and school is that the user access system is becoming platform agnostic. It has to for BYOD to work and that means native apps are hardly the best way to do this. The key to BYOD success is web/cloud apps.
    CowLauncher
    • How in the world do you came out with that conclusion???

      @CowLauncher There are no "cloud" based apps on any of the top lists and most of them are GAMES.<br><br>I honestly have no idea how your brain can even conclude that "people are using cloud based apps" from what was published in the article.
      wackoae
      • RE: Top iOS Apps lists not boding well for BYOD

        @wackoae Most are 99 cent games!
        slickjim
      • RE: Top iOS Apps lists not boding well for BYOD

        @wackoae Many cloud apps won't show on the list because you go through Safari to access them. Since Safari is built-in and not installed via the app store, it won't show in any app store statistics.

        That being said, it's still true that there's a lack of native cloud apps on the list. Many cloud apps certainly have a native app available.
        CobraA1
      • RE: Top iOS Apps lists not boding well for BYOD

        @wackoae No BYOD device touches my network except via a private cloud. All applications reside in the cloud, the device only needs to access the internet. None of the apps reside on the device itself, including "cloud based apps".
        kraabeasa
      • RE: Top iOS Apps lists not boding well for BYOD

        @zdnet: please stop this BYOD nonsense initiated months ago by Jason Perlow.

        Most people don't want to have their personal device associated with their work. Heck, most people don't even check their corporate email after hours. There are exceptions to this rule but they are just that, exceptions.
        markbn
      • RE: Top iOS Apps lists not boding well for BYOD

        @wackoae my argument is that the success of BYOD is dependant on cloud services and not native apps as the writer suggests. His conclusion is right in the article title. Get it? Honestly you do have no idea.
        CowLauncher
  • RE: Top iOS Apps lists not boding well for BYOD

    The iPad may work great for Keynote or Pages but any numbers work is a pain in the butt on the iPad.
    slickjim
    • RE: Top iOS Apps lists not boding well for BYOD

      @Peter Perry Get a stylus, not so bad.
      redeyesxbl
  • RE: Top iOS Apps lists not boding well for BYOD

    Take it easy. Not every mobile owner is professional who uses mobile phone for serious work. These are general stats. You can say this more confidently if universe of your data is restricted to people in certain age and in certain profession. And there are also people who carry two separate mobiles for Work and Personal needs.

    And by the way, what is wrong if a busy professional plays few games of Angry Bird while waiting to board the plane?
    kparicharak
  • RE: Top iOS Apps lists not boding well for BYOD

    "BYOD doesn???t have a chance of taking hold unless we evolve into primates who walk upright with devices that are ready to go to work."

    :P. So serious.

    "Yep, it???s a very bad day, indeed for someone who writes a Consumerization Blog and for someone who evangelizes the advantages of BYOD."

    Excellent. It's time we forgot about that silly concept anyways.

    "This is what you buy when you have the most advanced computing devices since the original IBM mainframes."

    Actually, my desktop is far more advanced than any mobile device on the market today. Nice try, though.

    "With the exception of Pages (and possibly Skype???that one can go either way), you???ve bought games.

    And everybody says that games are a niche market, and "average" (LOL!) people don't play them. Guess we know that isn't true.

    "You should be ashamed of yourselves, squandering good money on such nonsense."

    LOL. So self-righteous. Really, did you actually think these were truly productivity devices?

    The only reason bloggers see them as "productive" is because when your job is just typing text into a text box, you tend to forget about all of the other jobs that require things other than keyboards.

    "I???m guessing that you???re going to quote the O.G. Star Trek series episode, 'Shore Leave,' where Kirk states, 'The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play.' To which I respond, 'Blah blah blah, I???m not buying it.'"

    Enjoying your tirade?

    "And, while I???m at it, I need to tell you that I???d never allow a jailbroken device on my network. "

    Hey, you're the one who likes BYOD. Did you really expect that [b]PERSONAL[/b] devices are going to meet your high and almighty standards?

    There's a reason many businesses don't participate in BYOD: Because using personal devices for business is a bad idea. No matter how much you try to rationalize it, it's not an advantage to use BYOD in a business.

    The difference between a smart phone and a stapler is that a smart phone is a personal communications and entertainment device, while a stapler is just a tool. This basically blows out of the water every ridiculous claim of yours that smart phones are just some sort of office tool and should be treated like a stapler.

    So I will respond in the same manner as you responded to the "Shore Leave" episode:

    Blah blah blah, I???m not buying it. A smart phone is not a stapler, and BYOD was never a good idea to begin with.
    CobraA1
    • RE: Top iOS Apps lists not boding well for BYOD

      @CobraA1

      I don't think the author was particularly trying to champion BYOD in light of reality. I think his entire point is to agree that people in general are not ready for a BYOD type of environment.

      That said, people are bringing their own phones/tablets ANYWAY and playing games and doing social networking. Just because you don't let their tablet or smartphone connect to the network doesn't mean they don't have the device or use it to waste time.

      Personally, I'm not worried overly if my employer stops paying for my BB and data plan. If I have to buy my own phone I won't be buying a BB and I won't also be putting my work email on a personal phone and downloading work email on a personal data plan. So, if they want me to be always connected they will have to continue to pay for the BB and suck up the fact that I'm accessing my personal email and occasional game/facebook on it. Then again, considering they have me reading and responding to email on my personal/unpaid time I don't think they're going to grouse too much about me accessing personal email on work time.

      There's a give and take here that has to exist. An employer can't expect his employees to put in an uninterrupted 8 hour day and then also put in another couple hours at night, unpaid, while also paying for the data plan and phone to do all that. If the employer wants that always-connected access to its employees there has to be something given to make it attractive to the employee. If not, the employee simply won't play ball. He might not object outright but you'll simply find that your employee's phone was "in the other room" or "accidentally on silent" quite a lot compared to other companies.
      Ididar
      • RE: Top iOS Apps lists not boding well for BYOD

        @Ididar No... Hess is a BYOD evangelist... He's the Jim Bakker of BYOD, just read some of his other articles. Couldn't agree more with your other points. If a company wants me to be available 24/7 they are going to have to provide me with the tools to do that, or offer additional compensation to offset my cost.

        @CobraA1... Good post. Even if Hess can (intelligently) argue that a smartphone is just a tool (like a stapler), I still don't see many employers requiring me to bring my own stapler to work.

        I really have no problem with BYOD, just so long as employers understand what that second letter stands for. It's *your* device, not *theirs*. If they require me to have Citrix installed on it, fine... but it's gonna reside right between Angry Birds and Facebook. Deal with it.
        mcmurphy510
    • Speed and Power does not mean it's Advanced

      @CobraA1
      "....Actually, my desktop is far more advanced than any mobile device on the market today...."
      It may be more powerful and faster but it is not as advanced in terms of technology as tablets and smartphones. To pack the fastest processor and GPUs in a huge case with noisy fans does not constitute advanced. To offer portable devices that can last days without being plugged in, that weighs very little, has multitouch screens, cameras, GPS receiver, compass, g sensor, gyroscope, light sensor, barometer/pressure sensor, every wireless protocol (4G,bluetooth,wifi,NFC).....list goes on and on. You try to build a desktop that comes close to that in terms of features and is able to run on it's own power source for a whole day and tell me which is more advanced.
      warboat
      • RE: Top iOS Apps lists not boding well for BYOD

        @warboat Smartphones and mobile tablets are cheating in a way so comparing them to desktops is an illusion. These mobile devices most useful applications reside in whole or in part on a server somewhere. You can't load the entire GPS with maps onto a smartphone, it has to draw it off the Internet. The mobiles were also give slim operating systems that don't crash much because they don't process much. The desktop will always be the main unit of computing up to the point where we start to integrate computers into our homes and offices using motion and verbal input methods. But even in that future world, standalone mobiles will still provide limited capabilities by by comparison. Mobiles could become more productive tools if they were allowed to interface with larger stationary systems in order to use their input and output components. But we're far from creating a standard that smartphone and mobile tablet makers will follow.

        Note: I say "mobile tablet" to describe those that use the mobile OS (Android, iOS, WP7) as opposed to the regular tablet which comes loaded with Windows or Linux or similar systems.
        myangeldust
  • RE: Top iOS Apps lists not boding well for BYOD

    This just proves that smartphones (not just iphones) are toys. And of course people want to bring their toys to work... Bad idea.
    Jean-Pierre-
    • RE: Top iOS Apps lists not boding well for BYOD

      @Jean-Pierre- So being able to create and edit Office docs on my smartphone, being able to access exchange on my smartphone, being able to view and edit PDFs on my smartphone, being able to call, email, or text business clients on my smartphone makes it a toy not worth taking to work? Oh wait, my mini rant just disproved your theory that smartphones are toys. Oops.
      athynz
  • RE: Top iOS Apps lists not boding well for BYOD

    "most advanced computing device since IBM Mainframe"? Really? I don't know much if anything that is truly advanced in the iPad. Its just a computer with a touchscreen? Please advise on the advanced part as I am kind of lost here? Siri may be the only thing that could come close.
    OhTheHumanity
    • Real advancement in technology

      @OhTheHumanity<br>getting all the features into a small lightweight device that lasts a whole day on its own power source is very advanced, waaay more advanced than any desktop. The device has been adapted to work the way you do and go everywhere you do instead of you going to the machine and working the way IT does. That is the real advancement.
      warboat
      • I Agree...

        @warboat If by "advanced" you mean "smaller", rather than "more capable".
        radleym