The cloud hard sell; getting IT on board

The cloud hard sell; getting IT on board

Summary: Internal IT departments need to see cloud services as an enabler and not as a threat.

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With the adoption of cloud technologies in your enterprise, the IT staff finds itself in the unfamiliar position of being the consumer of IT services rather than the provider. This means that the concept of the user experience will be taking on a whole new meaning.

One of the primary issues in datacenter management has always been application management. In general, this has been a separate function within IT, with datacenter guys being responsible solely for datacenter operations, while the role of application management has been assigned to specialists in those specific application technologies.

With the applications being delivered through the cloud, the day-to-day operational needs of IT will continue to change. Monitoring the status of those applications and their delivery mechanisms will take on much more significance.  Traditional monitoring tools won't be available; all that internal IT will have is what their cloud providers choose to offer them.

This means that the process for selecting cloud providers not only needs to focus on the service delivery but also on the tools that internal IT will be able to use to assure the delivery of the contracted services.

Cloud providers are aware of the need to deliver service to their customer's IT departments and are attempting to differentiate their service offerings by providing services and tools directed at the internal IT personnel of their customer base.  They realize that the better access and control they can provide to existing corporate IT infrastructures, the more likely they are to be accepted and embraced by those same IT personnel.

Cloud services provider Rackspace has even leapt on the iPad bandwagon by offering an iPad application, Rackspace Cloud Pro, which IT can use to control and configure the cloud servers being provided Rackspace.  Of course, a single iPad app from one provider isn't going to give you control over all of the services that can be potentially provided through the cloud infrastructure, but it does indicate that vendors are aware that they really need to empower internal IT departments to get them to fully accept the potential changes that the move to cloud services portends.

Topics: Data Centers, CXO, Hardware, Storage

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6 comments
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  • It's not IT the cloud needs to sell.

    It's executives. And so far, they're doing a pretty damn good job.

    The cost/benefit for many companies to move the cloud is too great to ignore. IT can kick and scream all they want, but their days as they've known them are quickly coming to an end.

    The internal IT team of the future will either move on to work at one of the cloud companies, or will be replaced with one "cloud liaison" person making sure things are in good operation. With further refinements to user interfaces and technical stability, even that position may be optional.
    jrockefeller1@...
    • Embracing the Cloud - IT wins too !!

      I don't think this is about IT kicking and screaming or execs making decisions based upon numbers alone. And NO; Information Technology will NOT be 'replaced'.

      Rather, once IT embraces the features available in the cloud they will have the opportunity to add greater value to enterprise operations because their time won't be monopolized by keeping the lights on - the Cloud providers do that. Cloud based apps are a win for execs; a win for the bottom line and a win for Information Technology.
      emschles
    • amen brother

      You're so right. Once they sign into the cloud, there will no longer be a need for IT (or their kicking and screaming).

      We'll all relocate to the cloud.

      And if that's all really true, I can't wait for the day. Gone are the days of dealing directly with me -- you are now "on hold" and "in a queue" where you belong. :)
      veeesta
      • Check the news about Amazon's cloud services

        A SIP Brute Force Attacks started from servers with Amazon EC2 IP Addresses is being active for over a week now.

        Although Amazon was contacted by many customers, it ignored the problem FOR OVER A WEEK. Apparently instead of looking at the issue, they tried to setup a call between one of the complainers and the owner of a compromised account to have them resolve the problem themselves.

        So, how is that better than local IT??? A week of attacks, unanswered calls/emails/complains, compromised data and passing the hot potato to the victims.
        wackoae
  • RE: The cloud hard sell; getting IT on board

    Once IT embraces the the cloud they will have the opportunity to add greater value to enterprise operations because their time won't be monopolized by keeping the lights on - the Cloud providers do that.

    Cloud based apps are a win for execs; a win for the bottom line and a win for Information Technology.
    emschles
  • The Cloud SHOULD be a hard sell, always.

    1. Two-way transmission of critical data beyond the corporate firewall.
    2. VERY high insurance costs to cover compromised or lost data, or lose of business due to inability to connect. I'd love to see one single cloud provider ante up with a guarrantee to cover the entire average cost of lost business to a company if and when their system goes down.
    3. At least one more layer of beaurocracy to deal with.
    Dr_Zinj