Can a cell phone replace your digital camera?

Can a cell phone replace your digital camera?

Summary: If you ask the likes of Motorola and Sony Ericsson the answer is yes, of course. Both phone makers have recently announced camera phones with (relatively) high-resolution cameras that may be capable of replacing your point-and-shoot digital camera.

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TOPICS: Mobility, Hardware
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If you ask the likes of Motorola and Sony Ericsson the answer is yes, of course. Both phone makers have recently announced camera phones with (relatively) high-resolution cameras that may be capable of replacing your point-and-shoot digital camera.

Can a cell phone replace your digital camera?Announced today, Motorola's Motozine ZN5 is a collaboration between Motorola and Kodak and sports a 5 megapixel camera, built-in Xenon flash, andCan a cell phone replace your digital camera? a 2.5-inch LCD viewfinder. It's much more of a full-fledged camera than most camera phones, with auto focus, low-light settings, as well as panorama, macro, and multi-shot modes. Perhaps the best feature, though is the integrated Wi-Fi connectivity that lets you upload photos to the Kodak Gallery online service sans PC. Unlike some other camera phones, the ZN5 does let you transfer photos directly to a PC (without requiring you to pay wireless messaging fees), via Wi-Fi, Bluetooth file transfers, as well as the removable microSD card. The Motozine ZN5 will be available in China only in July 2008, and Motorola expects to roll it out across other countries throughout the rest of the year.

Can a cell phone replace your digital camera?If you can hold out even longer, you may want to wait for the Sony Ericsson C905, officially announced last week and due to ship in selected markets in Q4 2008. It's sure to be more expensive (though pricing hadn't been released for either camera phone), but has a more full-featured camera: 8.1 megapixels, Xenon flash, a 2.4-inch LCD viewfinder, with auto-focus, face detection, and image stabilization. It also supports Wi-Fi image transfers and better yet, is GPS-enabled for geo-tagging your photos.

Topics: Mobility, Hardware

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  • Not in near future

    considering features, we may find almost all the we need in a cell phone camera.
    Its tough to imagine a phone used as camera. If you have a family you cannot give ur camera(phone) to ur wife/kids. One things there, frnds cannot borrow. May be one more advantage is theft insurance will be covered by carrier as it is a phone. And, I hardly see premium phones from carriers.

    "Can a cell phone replace your digital camera?" NO
    Mr.SB
  • RE: Can a cell phone replace your digital camera?

    Optical Zoom? Shutter controls? If not, then not.

    Battery life (while maintaining the ability to make calls after an afternoon at the museum)? Spare batteries?

    I like the idea, but I don't think that it will "replace" my camera.
    John Galt's Smarter Broth
  • Already did for me

    I'm not a professional photographer, or even a budding amateur, looking to capture the most magnificent shot possible. My photography is basic; shots of my son playing with his toys, a cool sign or bumper sticker, a view from atop a mountain, etc.

    I replaced my old 1.5 megapixel camera with the Samsung SCH-a990 phone -- the precursor to the FlipShot -- and now take 3.0 megapixel shots at a resolution of 2048 x 1536. With the use of a steady surface and multiple ISO settings, I can combine the shots using qtpfsgui and have spectacular looking shots that more than suit my purposes.

    And I have one less device to carry around when I'm on vacation. It works for me.
    MariusSilverwolf
    • you have upgraded not just replaced :)

      1.5 MP digital camera ? I bet you can find more feature on the cell phone camera from past couple of years. No wonder you are happy with the picture quality of 3MP cell phone camera.
      Mr.SB
      • Again, not a photographer

        I don't take many pictures. I took fewer before. And I'm only carrying around one device, my phone, when I'm on vacation and need to take pictures.

        I came out on top.
        MariusSilverwolf
  • Yes: Nokia N95 with Carl Zeiss Optics 5mp

    nt
    D T Schmitz
    • Try using N95 as both your camera AND phone for a full day

      Good luck getting enough use out of the battery on a
      Nokia N95 if you're both taking a lot of snaps and trying to
      use it as a phone for the whole day. (And it REALLY sucks
      to be you if you forgot to plug it in to charge the night
      before.)

      IMHO better to get a real camera with full controls, optical
      zoom, etc. and then a separate, less bulky mobile phone.
      You'd have to carry two dedicated devices, but you'll
      probably actually save money and get better results along
      with better battery life (even--surprise--several day's
      worth without recharging).

      Battery life is yet to be known with the Motorola and Sony
      Ericsson phones mentioned in the article, too.
      Lun_Esex
  • RE: Can a cell phone replace your digital camera?

    Already did for me too...

    The compelling reason is that it's in my pocket. It's always in my pocket!

    I am a former owner of a high-end Cannon 35mm SLR (you know, the sort you can hardly carry, that gave rise to the medical term "photographer's shoulder" to describe a person who had one shoulder an inch lower from the weight of the camera gear).

    Wanna know how many compelling, valuable, profitable or momentous shots I missed? Thousands! Why? Because the camera was always at home when they happened.

    Not any more.
    John McGhie
  • RE: Can a cell phone replace your digital camera?

    with now the incoming of new 5 MP and even 8 MP phones, wondering how far are digital-cameras going to stretch.
    akshays
  • RE: Can a cell phone replace your digital camera?

    Sure, but what do you sacrifice with a camera
    phone?
    1. Flash coverage for group shots of five or
    more people.
    2. Battery life for indoor flash photo events of
    more than thirty exposures.
    3. Optical zoom lens of more than 3X or 4X
    power. Digital zooms suck, especially with
    flash.

    I love my 18-month old Sony Ericsson 580i
    camera phone for taking shots of anything of
    interest during the course of the day. Especially
    enjoy sending my photo(s) to other friends'
    phones (limited) or mostly e-mail via MMS.

    I love my Canon A1000 IS 10.0 Megapix
    compact camera for long family events, copying
    art pieces, and landscapes.

    When I don't have my Canon, I always have my
    camera phone and use it with confidence.

    Once Apple introduces the iPhone with a xeon flash, that's
    when I jump onboard and sign up for .ME service and link
    up my MAC PowerBook.
    RickyDickk