Chris Jablonski

Christopher Jablonski is a freelance technology writer. Previously, he held research analyst positions in the IT industry and was the manager of marketing editorial at CBS Interactive. He's been contributing to ZDNet since 2003.</p> <p>Christopher received a bachelor's degree in business administration from the University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign. With over 12 years in IT, he's an expert on transformational technologies, particularly those influential in B2B.

Latest Posts

Holograms to help nanotechnology

Holograms to help nanotechnology

Researchers from Harvard University and New York University have found a way to use holographic optical traps (HOTs) to manipulate semiconductor nanowires. This could open the way for new forms of optical and electronic devices like fast, high-capacity computer memory chips.

November 10, 2005 by in Hardware

Greenland's ice belly is growing

Greenland's ice belly is growing

By using eleven years of data collected by satellites, European researchers have found that the ice sheet covering the interior of Greenland has gotten thicker at a rate of more than 6 centimeters per year. And even if it looks strange, it is completely coherent with the theories about global warming.

November 8, 2005 by in Innovation

A new biopaper for organ printing

A new biopaper for organ printing

Organ printing is an emerging branch of medicine which uses healthy cells to repair a damaged or diseased organ but it obviously needs ink, paper and a printer. Now, a new biopaper developed at the University of Utah might potentially help millions of people waiting for transplants for livers or kidneys.

November 7, 2005 by in Tech Industry

Find your genetic father... online

Find your genetic father... online

Last week, New Scientist revealed how a 15-year-old boy found his genetic father by using a DNA-testing service. The only problem with this story is that the boy was conceived via an anonymous sperm donor. This could have huge implications for thousands of other anonymous donors all around the world.

November 6, 2005 by in Enterprise Software

Better terrain maps of Earth... and beyond

Better terrain maps of Earth... and beyond

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) thinks that today's computer maps of the Earth are inaccurate for its needs. So it recently awarded a grant to a Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) researcher to develop better computer terrain maps of the surface of Earth and even our moon or Mars.

November 5, 2005 by in Developer

Storing liquid CO2 in the oceans?

Storing liquid CO2 in the oceans?

One of the ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is to capture carbon dioxide at its source, when it is emitted from power plants for example, and to store it in other places, such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs or even the ocean after liquefaction. But, according to Youxue Zhang, a professor at the University of Michigan, there are pitfalls in this last plan.

November 4, 2005 by in Innovation

No more blurry pictures!

No more blurry pictures!

Computer scientists from Stanford University have developed a camera which contains a microlens array between the main lens and the photosensor. Their "light field camera" takes one shot, but also captures information about light conditions, which makes possible to later compute photographs in which subjects at every depth appear in finely tuned focus.

November 3, 2005 by in Hardware

A helicoid with a handle

A helicoid with a handle

For the first time in more than 200 years, a team of mathematicians from Rice, Stanford and Indiana universities has discovered a new shape of geometrical minimal shape. Their 'genus one helicoid' looks like a parking garage ramp or a curved soap film, but with a curved handle, like you can find on a coat hanger or a coffee mug.

November 1, 2005 by in Tech Industry

Exploring Mars will be a risky business

Exploring Mars will be a risky business

Are humans ready to stay on Mars for several months? Can we deal with all the risks that its environment may cause to astronauts and space missions? According to a report from NASA, the #1 risk is Martian dust because it can potentially damage power systems, space suits and filtration systems.

October 31, 2005 by in Innovation

Can your mouth become multilingual?

Can your mouth become multilingual?

A new computer technology based on artificial intelligence (AI) and statistical methods promises to deliver speech-to-speech translation in many languages. And one day, it might even be implanted into your mouth and your throat.

October 30, 2005 by in Hardware

A big boost for optical networks

A big boost for optical networks

Engineers at Stanford University have built a silicon germanium modulator which can manipulate a beam of laser light on and off up to 100 billion times a second. This potentially opens the way to optical networks ten times faster than today's networks.

October 29, 2005 by in Networking

More secure signatures

More secure signatures

IBM is working on a system using dynamic signature verification as a biometric authentication of the purchaser. The system, dubbed Sign and Go, checks your signature by comparing it to several previously recorded samples and analysing the speed and the movements of your hand when you sign on a digital pad.

October 24, 2005 by in IBM

Newsletters

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
See All
See All

Top Stories