Chris Jablonski

Christopher Jablonski is a freelance technology writer. Previously, he held research analyst positions in the IT industry and was the manager of marketing editorial at CBS Interactive. He's been contributing to ZDNet since 2003.</p> <p>Christopher received a bachelor's degree in business administration from the University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign. With over 12 years in IT, he's an expert on transformational technologies, particularly those influential in B2B.

Latest Posts

Atoms collide like tennis balls

Atoms collide like tennis balls

A team of physicists has used ultrafast lasers to look at atoms during collisions lasting just half a picosecond (trillionth of a second). And they were able to confirm the theory that atoms and tennis balls share common properties.

October 23, 2005 by in CXO

A desert tent coming from space

A desert tent coming from space

The Desert Seal tent has been developed by a Swiss and an Italian architects to improve the life of people living in very arid and hot deserts by applying the methodology and principles used in space design and development.

October 23, 2005 by in Innovation

Extreme weather changes in front of us

Extreme weather changes in front of us

Researchers from Purdue University have used their supercomputers to run the largest simulation of what could become the weather in the U.S. between 2071 and 2095. And their model, which was validated by using data from last century, predicts more extreme temperatures throughout the country.

October 21, 2005 by in CXO

Can asbestos help us understand nanotoxicity?

Can asbestos help us understand nanotoxicity?

Using our knowledge of asbestos could help us to assess the risks from nanoparticles, or their nanotoxicity. For example, nanotubes which are now used for many industrial developments have similar shapes as fibers like asbestos, being long and extremely thin. And like nanomaterials today, asbestos was considered as harmless when humans were exposed to it.

October 19, 2005 by in Enterprise Software

NASA's better eyes to find planets

NASA's better eyes to find planets

Finding extrasolar planets is quite difficult mainly because of three basic facts: planets don't produce any light of their own; they are far from us; and they are lost in the blinding glare of their parent stars. But now, NASA engineers have found a way to eliminate this blinding light, and this is "a giant step toward finding Earth-like planets."

October 17, 2005 by in Innovation

DARPA's new plan for machine learning

DARPA's new plan for machine learning

The U.S. DARPA Agency is starting a new project to develop computer software able to learn and reason in complex military planning jobs by being shown how to perform a task only once. The goal is to replace some military decision by software technology within four years.

October 16, 2005 by in Tech Industry

Watch your fuel burning in 3-D

Watch your fuel burning in 3-D

A collaboration between computer scientists and researchers in their labs has lead to some virtual experiments which are improving combustion efficiency by simulating the combustion process with unmatched accuracy. Will it be enough to reduce the cost of filling your tank? Probably not.

October 13, 2005 by in Hardware

A new speedy way to simulate collisions of objects

A new speedy way to simulate collisions of objects

A Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) computer scientist has developed a new method to simulate collisions of objects which is a thousand times faster than previous ones. This method could be used for applications in computer-generated animation and video games, but also for surgical simulations or drug design.

October 10, 2005 by in Hardware

A program that learns from itself

A program that learns from itself

Two professors of the University of Texas at Arlington have developed a computer program that can find patterns in data represented as graphs. But what's more important is that this program can learn from its own discoveries. The first potential application is about counter-terrorism.

October 9, 2005 by in Big Data Analytics

An Apple supercluster for Europe

An Apple supercluster for Europe

A U.K. startup company, Omneta plc, is about to build a distributed supercluster able to reach a peak performance of 120 teraflops for a sustained performance of about 70 teraflops. This supercomputer, which would become the most powerful in Europe, will be made of several thousands of Apple Xserve G5 servers and should be commercially available next year.

October 6, 2005 by in Apple

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