Netgear ushers in Gigabit Wi-Fi with first 802.11ac router

Netgear ushers in Gigabit Wi-Fi with first 802.11ac router

Summary: The networking company looks poised to be the first with a next-generation router on the market with speeds up to three times faster than 802.11n.

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Netgear has introduced the R6300 WiFi Router, which is the first 802.11ac dual-band gigabit Wi-Fi router capable of speeds over 1Gbps on a wireless network.

Netgear R6300 Dual Band Gigabit WiFi Router

The next-generation router is backwards-compatible with 802.11a/b/g/n technology and operates in dual band, with speeds potentially reaching 1300Mbps over 5Ghz, and 450Mbps over 2.4Ghz. The R6300 runs on a Wi-Fi chip from Broadcom.

The sleekly designed router is designed to deliver gigabit wireless speeds that are three times faster than today’s 802.11n routers, allowing users to send multiple streams of HD video across a wireless network.

The 802.11ac standard, which is headed toward finalization by the IEEE later this year, is capable of the high throughput because it extends the techniques used in 802.11n to provide wider channel bandwidth, more MIMO spatial streams, multi-user MIMO, and additional modulation modes.

The R6300, marketed as "5G Wi-Fi" will be priced at $199.99; Netgear plans to begin shipping it in May.

D-Link and other competitors also plan to follow suit with 802.11ac products slated for release in 2012.

Topics: Mobility, Networking, Wi-Fi

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9 comments
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  • Sounds good but ...

    1. Guess I'm going to need some new wireless adapters for my PC's (and portable).
    2. My ISP doesn't like me replacing their router (read: voids contract).
    3. What I'd really like is a router which could fail over between an ADSL and 3G connection.
    Any ideas?
    jacksonjohn
    • Will not need to replace your ISP router perhaps

      My ISP router provides us a connection to the Internet, to that I connect our local router. Our connected router provides connectivity for all computers to speak with each other, printer access, and to go out the ISP router to the Web.
      BubbaJones_
    • There is an option for you

      The Netgate 8100 will accept a 3G card and provide fail over protection. Works well but reception is obviously and issue so might need an antenna if there is an issue.
      droidfromsd
      • Be aware that 3G routers rarely allow full speed

        And it is worse for higher speed devices. For example, while the 7.2Mbps devices may lose 15-20%, 21Mbps devices can lose 40%. I wouldn't want to use 4G devices on them, if they were 'compatible'. These were for NetComm and Draytek (they tested their latest one at the time and it lost 40%) devices.

        I eventually went back to plugging the USB modem into a spare silent Atom laptop (Sony P Series) that runs ICS to share the connection and assign IP addresses. Makes you wonder what these routers are running if a lowly Atom single-core CPU can run Win7 Ultimate and still run rings around them. Our 4G connection works very well this way.

        We run the laptop into a GbE wireless n router for the portable devices and on to several GbE switches for the desktops and entertainment devices.
        Patanjali
  • But what is its actual throughput?

    Maximum channel values does not equate to real world performance.
    Patanjali
    • @Patanjali .. ditto!

      the only guy here who seems to know what this translates to in reality.

      After all, what's the point of having a gigabit router when the bottleneck is the broadband service? When we have gigabit broadband (really!) - that gives throughput (uplink/downlink) of 100's of Mb's to Gb's / second of throughput, then we'll have something worth talking about here.
      thx-1138_
      • well

        You're right if you are talking about just streaming/downloading etc from the internet, broadband is the bottleneck...

        But there is a very good reason to have gigabit WiFi in the home, especially if you have centralized video and are streaming to multiple locations in the home.
        TGGR
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  • Netgear Manual

    Netgear WiFi with 802-11ac- router is one of the good product which provides many features but now days netgear updates their products and it has many features..

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    alexischarlotte