D-Link turns every power outlet into wall-to-wall network

D-Link turns every power outlet into wall-to-wall network

Summary: D-Link today introduced its next-generation PowerLine adapter kit that connects computers, high-definition media players, game consoles, network attached storage and Internet content in the home.The PowerLine HD Ethernet Adapter Starter Kit (DHP-303) allows the user to take advantage of existing home electrical wiring to create or extend a network by turning "every power outlet in the home into a wall-to-wall network for connecting" when connected to a switch or wireless access point.

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TOPICS: Networking
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D-Link today introduced its next-generation PowerLine adapter kit that connects computers, high-definition media players, game consoles, network attached storage and Internet content in the home.

The PowerLine HD Ethernet Adapter Starter Kit (DHP-303) allows the user to take advantage of existing home electrical wiring to create or extend a network by turning "every power outlet in the home into a wall-to-wall network for connecting" when connected to a switch or wireless access point. (The kit includes two wall plugs/adapters.)

Installation is plug-and-play, and the system can connect devices such as TiVo, Slingbox, Xbox 360, Playstation 3, Nintendo Wii and others to the home network and the Internet. (The device will automatically be displayed in Microsoft Windows Vista's Network Map.)

The PowerLine Adapter uses Triple Data Encryption Standard (3DES) for one-button security and uses Quality of Service support to help prioritize data in the pipeline.

More specs:

  • Uses home's existing electrical wiring
  • Streams HD media across the network
  • Up to 200Mbps throughput
  • Plugs into existing power outlets
  • Extends wireless LAN by connecting an access point

The PowerLine HD Network Adapter Starter Kit is available everywhere for $139.99.

Topic: Networking

Andrew Nusca

About Andrew Nusca

Andrew Nusca is a former writer-editor for ZDNet and contributor to CNET. During his tenure, he was the editor of SmartPlanet, ZDNet's sister site about innovation.

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27 comments
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  • ...nothing new

    I've had this running in my home for about a year now...I mean, I get that this may be a new product for D-Link, but don't go making it sound like they've invented something new here. They're just catching on, there are already multiple offerings at 200MBps from other companies such as Netgear, Belkin and even Linksys.
    NamelessFor Now
    • exactly

      been using the netgear AV (200mbps) here for over a year as well, and many others have existed (albeit not as fast) for quite some time. welcome to the new millennium, d-link...
      bc3tech
  • Netgear is the only...

    way to go if you want to use Powerline technology.
    bjbrock
    • Netgear? No thanks.

      I use the Linksys PLE200's (have been for about 2 years now). They work great and I have several on different VLANs.
      JT82
      • Netgear and Linksys are almost exactly the same!!!!

        Anyone who has used certain Walmart sold Netgear routers and actually done the research can tell you that Linksys and Netgear are almost exactly alike outside of external looks. So if a person is willing to use a Linksys product, he/she must also be willing to use a Netgear product by default.
        hantoyo1@...
  • Proofreading

    Enlightening article about great technology but how about proofreading before posting? Xbox 260? Was that the version before the 360? And then there's that famous console maker Nintengo. Maybe they should have used that name as a play on words as opposed to Nintendo. Great article but spelling errors make you question any facts posted in the article.
    iceman2000
    • Re: Proofreading

      It's been corrected. Thanks for pointing it
      out.

      If you see a typo, please use the e-mail link
      next to my picture to alert me more quickly.
      andrew.nusca
      • I think he was....

        taking advantage of the opportunity to make you look bad. But seriously, 260? Nintengo?
        CHRISSSSSSSSSS
  • RE: D-Link turns every power outlet into wall-to-wall network

    Anyone have practical throughput benchmarking numbers? 200MBps is theoretical. What are ppl actually realizing?
    dave_helmut
  • RE: D-Link turns every power outlet into wall-to-wall network

    What is the big improvement over their older powerline ethernet adapters? Take a look at amazon.com reviews for their DHP-301 model. The reviews there are extremely negative. Many people complained that the 301's stopped working within a couple months of the purchase date. My networking hardware at home is mostly D-Link, but I have never used a powerline ethernet adapter. Based on the reviews of D-Link's older models, I would wait for some product reviews from reputable sources before buying the DHP-303.
    parkerjgpatton
    • D-Link wall wart transmitters

      I should think that anytime you pass radio frequency energy through house wiring, it just becomes a huge antenna, causing all sorts of interference, potential harm to communications.. This is not much different than BroadBand over Power Lines.. they emmitted various bands of unwanted energy, (radio signals) that can and did disrupt communications near them.. my Vote..D-Link, Prove to me beyond doubt that you have finally fixed that problem. JR. wb7wvo radio operator, licensed by the FCC.
      friendlyoger@...
    • I used the original powerline gear

      I used the original (spec 1) powerline setup, it worked well enough for me until it died after a year and a half, and at that point they weren't supporting spec 1 because spec 2 was supposed to replace it but wasn't out yet. So at that point I went to wireless. But if my wireless router ever dies I'll at least consider powerline again.
      rpolunsky@...
  • RE: D-Link turns every power outlet into wall-to-wall network

    We all know that cable is better. But which alternative would you choose; WiFi or Carrier Current (D-Link)? I would go WiFi. Cleaner and better throughput potential.
    GregMaher
  • Prior Units Advertised Falsely

    The phrase they use to "turn every outlet in a home into a wall-to-wall networking" just has never been true for homes with split electrical circuits. While that size home is perfect for this type of technology, it only works on one leg of the split. The other leg can receive no service. I've tried about every one of these devices with no luck or support from the manufacturer.
    JRMcBride
    • Split electrical circuits

      Off hand for us non-electricians, is there any way to know whether your home has split electrical circuits? I assume that means there are different circuits covering different zones, each terminating in a different master breaker?
      rpolunsky@...
  • Old invention

    As its rightly pointed out by someone, this is old
    technology and similar products already exist in the
    market. There is no innovation.
    p.vinnie@...
  • RE: D-Link turns every power outlet into wall-to-wall network

    I agree with a previous poster. Why is this news? This
    technology has been around for a few years from
    several other vendors. I have a pair from Zyxel
    myself. I use it to stream video to my PS3. A 100%
    signal on a WiFi G (54Mbps) could not reliably stream
    video, this technology was the answer. As far as
    actual performance, about 100Mbps down and 80 up. The
    article title may be a bit mis-leading, it is every
    outlet on the same major circuit (power panel) that
    you have an adapter for. Individual adapters typically
    run about 80% of the price for a pair. Overall, it is
    a good solution in many situations - but it is not
    new.
    subscriptions@...
  • Is this paid advertising?

    Why is this news? It doesn't seem to have any new technology or features.

    Plus, you have to plug it in directly, which will probably prevent the other plug from being used.

    I have several from Panasonic that have ordinary plugs on them, which is much better.

    They cost me about $25 each and I can view a Netflix movie with no problems.
    ron.cleaver@...
  • What about outlets on the other side of the pole transformer?

    And how well does this technology work if the two outlets you are using are on opposite sides of the transformer windings? I had that problem with X-10. In order to fix this you had to have an electrician add a "coupler" (nothing more than a capcitor w/ a fuse) inside your electrical service box to couple the two rails together. Without this, the RF had to travel outside your house, back to the pole transformer, move over to the other rail, and travel back to the house. Basically it didn't because the distance to the pole transformer was too far, and the X-10 devices did not respond. In most (US) homes your 115v single phase service is brought in as 220 volts, with a center tap on the transformer to ground. Each side of the coil to the CT is 115 volts, and end to end is 220. Some of your outlets are on one side of the CT, some the other. Plug a transmitting device on one side, and a receiver on the other and they are not on the same circuit.

    I don't see any difference here with these devices. As long as you're on the same side of the transformer, it should work.

    Anyone have any experience with this sort of problem on older power line networking devices?
    WindowWasher
  • Last-Generation and Alien?

    Last time *I* checked, it was an Xbox 360, not a 260. I'd rather keep a console that goes *all the way* around, not one that can't even make three-quarters.

    What the hell is a Nintengo Wii?

    Sorry, being nitpicky today. Proofread please.
    Nox13last