HTC-made Google Nexus One certified by FCC

HTC-made Google Nexus One certified by FCC

Summary: The "Google phone," HTC's Nexus One, was approved this morning by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission as model number PB99100.

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The "Google phone," HTC's Nexus One, was approved this morning by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission as model number PB99100.

The trio of filings (first, second, third) confirm a few technical details, such as microSD expansion, 802.11b/g Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR.

The report also raises new questions about the device's potential carrier landing spot, with support for quad-band GSM/GPRS/EDGE with UMTS/HSUPA on 850/1700/1900 frequencies.

Translation: Hello T-Mobile, and perhaps AT&T, too.

Topics: HTC, Google, Government, Government US

Andrew Nusca

About Andrew Nusca

Andrew Nusca is a former writer-editor for ZDNet and contributor to CNET. During his tenure, he was the editor of SmartPlanet, ZDNet's sister site about innovation.

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8 comments
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  • Uh - No AT&T for you

    It doesn't support AT&T 3G, just T-Mobile USA (Band 4) and overseas 900/2100 3G..

    That's what it seems like at least.
    seemytailbby
    • Fogive me but...

      ... band VII is UMTS850. I'm glad it's well supported in the states, it would give AT&T and T-Mobile incentive to compete head to head in the 3g markets - like the competition that controls the Asian markets - unlocked handsets and GSM carriers really do bring up the level of service considerably.

      My only concern is a lack of international support. A device like that *can't* sell in Europe or Asia with out some revision of specs.

      Perhaps down the road this could be our first 3gQuad-band device? *Fingers crossed*
      GolatHi
  • Hello AT&T...

    I do hope this phone works on the AT&T network. AT&T by far is the best in my area, so I'm not switching carriers. But, I'm getting tired of the iPhone logics on marketing and phone control. There was so much more I could do with my old Windows Mobile, but got tired of the crashes that phone suffered. The iPhone cleared up the reliability a lot. Hopefully a good Google based phone will have the best of both worlds.
    Narg
  • RE: HTC-made Google Nexus One certified by FCC

    Here, we have access to two wireless carriers. US Cellular and Verizon. No decent phones for us.
    vger_z
  • RE: HTC-made Google Nexus One certified by FCC

    This phone looks to be very exciting and interesting! It
    is going to be very interesting to see how Google flips
    the whole wireless industry on its side. There is already
    a forum setup to discuss all the goodness that is this
    phone... http:///www.nexususers.com
    inXorable
  • RE: HTC-made Google Nexus One certified by FCC

    What about CDMA for Canada and our market we like to use new products as well.
    I see no parameters allowing CDMA for use in Canada
    khaidastudent@...
    • CDMA deprecated in most of the world

      Our CDMA networks have been replaced as have many around the world.. maybe the market isn't big enough any more.
      Aussie_linux_user
  • RE: HTC-made Google Nexus One certified by FCC

    This is not a CDMA phone. That's largely because, at
    present, CDMA networks in the USA (the primary place
    they're used) are not open.

    CDMA does an end run around phone locking laws. The
    law requires carriers to unlock phones, which allows
    them to work on GSM networks, more or less (eg,
    subject to UMTS frequency differences). On CMDA,
    you're always "unlocked", but since each network owner
    supplies the phones, complete with unchangeable
    internal ID codes rather than the SIM card used on GSM
    phones, they catalog their phones, and reject any
    others simply based on the phone.

    So, in essence, all phones are unlocked, but the
    networks themselves are locked.

    Google's contribution to the 700MHz auction, which
    goes online first next year with Verizon's LTE
    network's opening, was to get in the requirement that
    700MHz be kept open. So you will, in the future, be
    able to buy an off-the-shelf, no-contract LTE device
    and hook up to Verizon's network. AT&T will also have
    a 4G LTE network, starting in 2011.
    Hazydave