Logitech MX mice offer 'Darkfield' tech; work on glass, glossy surfaces

Logitech MX mice offer 'Darkfield' tech; work on glass, glossy surfaces

Summary: Logitech on Wednesday announced two new premium mice, the Logitech Performance Mouse MX and the Logitech Anywhere Mouse MX, which both feature "Darkfield Laser Tracking," which allows mousing on clear glass (at least 4 mm thick) and high-gloss surfaces.According to the company, 40 percent of people have a glass surface in their home, which poses a problem for mice with more traditional tracking methods, such as laser and optical technologies.

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TOPICS: Hardware
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Logitech on Wednesday announced two new premium mice, the Logitech Performance Mouse MX and the Logitech Anywhere Mouse MX, which both feature "Darkfield Laser Tracking," which allows mousing on clear glass (at least 4 mm thick) and high-gloss surfaces.

According to the company, 40 percent of people have a glass surface in their home, which poses a problem for mice with more traditional tracking methods, such as laser and optical technologies.

So how's it work? Logitech describes:

Regular laser tracking technology relies on the ability of the mouse’s sensor to detect the textural details of the surface. The more irregularities a surface exhibits, the easier it is for the sensor to identify reference points that it can use to accurately measure motion. However, because high-gloss surfaces such as glass are almost completely flat, there are not enough details for a typical laser mouse’s sensor to detect.

To track on glass (that’s at least 4 mm thick), Logitech Darkfield uses dark field microscopy to detect microscopic particles and micro-scratches on these surfaces, rather than tracking the surface itself. Similar to the way in which our eye sees the clear night sky, the mouse’s sensor sees the clean areas of glass as a dark background with bright dots – the dust. Then, the sensor interprets the movement of these dots to track exactly where you’ve moved the mouse.

The Logitech Performance Mouse MX (pictured at top) is a full-size mouse, while the Logitech Anywhere Mouse MX (pictured, above) is a compact, notebook-ready mouse. Both mice feature standard Logitech innovations such as the click hyper-scroll wheel and the company's new "Unifying" micro USB receiver that can be shared among up to five Logitech accessories.

The full-size Performance Mouse MX is a sculpted, right-handed model with a micro-USB charging system, four customizable thumb buttons and force-sensitive side-to-side scrolling (software enabled).

The Performance Mouse MX will retail for $99.99, while the Anywhere Mouse MX will retail for $79.99. Both are expected to be available in the U.S. and Europe beginning in August.

Topic: Hardware

Andrew Nusca

About Andrew Nusca

Andrew Nusca is a former writer-editor for ZDNet and contributor to CNET. During his tenure, he was the editor of SmartPlanet, ZDNet's sister site about innovation.

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7 comments
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  • Why so few bluetooth mice?

    This sounds great to me but why no bluetooth option, especially on the compact mouse? With laptops shrinking, USB ports are often the first things to be reduced and I don't see why I should take up a USB slot for a wireless connection when my laptop already has a perfectly good wireless peripheral solution built in. I have to admit that I find this very frustrating.
    NonZealot
    • because

      bluetooth:
      -expensive.
      -slow
      -laggy
      -hard to configure (and hard to keep the communication)
      -battery eater

      A bluetooth mouse cost the same (if not more) than a mouse with a custom usb dongle.
      magallanes
      • I can understand for desktops

        While I don't necessarily agree with all your bullet points (my current Logitech BT mouth wasn't expensive, isn't slow or laggy, isn't hard to configure, and lasts about 3 months with nearly constant usage), I could understand that USB wireless mice might have slight advantages in each of the items that you listed above. For a desktop with USB ports galore, I would have no problems with a wireless mouse but on my laptop with only 2 USB ports, a USB wireless mouse takes up half my slots. Considering I store my music on a portable USB HD and my Zune requires a USB port to sync, that takes up all my ports leaving none for a wireless mouse. In that case, I would [b]happily[/b] pay more for a BT mouse.
        NonZealot
  • RE: Logitech MX mice offer 'Darkfield' tech; work on glass, glossy surfaces

    I have had two mx Mice in 3 months, both failed. (not the ones listed above)Before I would buy Check out what you have to go through to replace them on L's Warranty. I still do not have mine.Wbmonster@hotmail.com
    wbmonster
  • RE: Logitech MX mice offer 'Darkfield' tech; work on glass, glossy surfaces

    I wish they would make one without the side buttons!
    msadams1
  • RE: Logitech MX mice offer 'Darkfield' tech; work on glass, glossy surfaces

    and less heavy
    magallanes
  • Sold!

    I'll gladly try it.

    As of 60 minutes ago, I'm a devoted fan of Logitech. Why is that?

    Out of three Logitech v220 mice that I ordered for various computers, one of them failed about two months after it arrived. That's too late to return to the seller -- TigerDirect -- so I sent an email to Logitech inquiring how to get a replacement under warranty. They replied immediately and explained a relatively simple process for getting a new mouse. It arrived an hour ago. No hassles. No shipping fee. Other than the failure, the v220 has been flawless, and a great mouse for even the most precise Photoshop work.

    If the Anywhere Mouse will work on reflective surfaces, all the better.
    lastar84